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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Darwin’

‘Pippi Longstocking’ Author Astrid Lindgren Gets a Spot on Sweden’s 20 Krona Note

Kulturresan_20_High_PressBeloved children’s author Astrid Lindgren will appear on Sweden’s 20 krona note.

The Riksbank, Sweden’s central bank, announced this news back in 2011. They plan to start distributing the note sometime between 2014 and 2015.

Artist Göran Österlund designed the note and included a drawing of Lindgren’s revered heroine Pippi Longstocking into the final image. BuzzFeed reports that 20 Krona can be exchanged for about $3 USD.

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‘Great Adaptations’ Picture Book Featured On Kickstarter

Tiffany Taylor, an author who holds a Ph.D. in evolutionary biology, hopes to raise $25,000 on Kickstarter for her picture book project, Great Adaptations. The finished book will contain ten stories, written in verse, that talk about evolution.

Taylor describes her book as a mash-up between Charles Darwin and Dr. Seuss. We’ve embedded a video about the project above. Here’s more from the Kickstarter page:

“Each story is written in close collaboration with esteemed and up-and-coming scientists who have conducted extensive research on the topic at hand, and illustrated by an artist who shares an interest in the topic. For readers who want to learn more on the subject, the scientists are also providing a short commentary.”

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Free Books That Neil deGrasse Tyson Thinks Everybody Should Read

After celebrating his birthday, physicist and author Neil deGrasse Tyson turned to Twitter to express his problems with the hit movie, Gravity.

The physicist and author once answered a question that matters to all Galleycat readers: “Which books should be read by every single intelligent person on the planet?” He created a concise list of classic books. Follow the links below to download free ePub, Kindle or text versions of the books.

In the video embedded above,  Tyson answered another cosmic question–does the universe have a purpose? Do you agree with his answer?

 

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Jane Austen Gets a Spot on UK’s £10 Note

Beloved writer Jane Austen will replace author and naturalist Charles Darwin on the UK’s £10 note in 2017.

Bank of England governor Mark Carney had this statement:

Jane Austen certainly merits a place in the select group of historical figures to appear on our banknotes. Her novels have an enduring and universal appeal and she is recognised as one of the greatest writers in English literature. As Austen joins Adam Smith, Boulton and Watt, and in future, Churchill, our notes will celebrate a diverse range of individuals who have contributed in a wide range of fields.

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Wislawa Szymborska Has Died

Nobel Prize-winning Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska has passed away. She was 88 years old.

Here’s more from her Nobel biography: “Szymborska was born in Kórnik in Western Poland on 2 July 1923. Since 1931 she has been living in Krakow, where during 1945-1948 she studied Polish Literature and Sociology at the Jagiellonian University. Szymborska made her début in March 1945 with a poem “Szukam slowa” (I am Looking for a Word) in the daily Dziennik Polski. During 1953-1981 she worked as poetry editor and columnist in the Kraków literary weekly Zycie Literackie.”

She ended a poem about Charles Darwin by celebrating the “indispensable silver lining” of novels, a fond way to remember literary life of the great poet.

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The Importance of Marginalia

Did you know that President Thomas Jefferson, novelist Mark Twain, and evolutionary biologist Charles Darwin all wrote in the margins? According to the New York Times, marginalia was denounced in the 20th century as a form of graffiti. These days, scholars love marked up books.

The article offers these observations from University of Toronto professor Heather Jackson: “Books with markings are increasingly seen these days as more valuable, not just for a celebrity connection but also for what they reveal about the community of people associated with a work…examining marginalia reveals a pattern of emotional reactions among everyday readers that might otherwise be missed, even by literary professionals.”

The Caxton Club and the Newberry Library will host a symposium in March to debate this subject; Jackson will be speaking there as well. The event will spotlight on a new essay collection entitled Other People’s Books: Association Copies and the Stories They Tell. This title contains 52 essays and 112 illustrations.

Exhibiting the John Murray Archive

The Scotsman reports on the John Murray Archive exhibition at the National Library of Scotland, which is doing everything in its power to bring alive the 150,000 documents and papers in the archive for which it paid £31 million 18 months ago. Original letters from Charles Darwin, David Livingstone, Lord Byron, and others are on show with sophisticated touch screens, interactive sound effects, and false windows made from flat-screen televisions. Martyn Wade, the library’s chief executive, said: “This is to encourage people who would not normally go into the reading room, people that wonder what the archive’s about. It’s important that they can actually look at the originals.”

The exhibition was opened yesterday by writer, broadcaster and former Python Michael Palin. “For a traveller and a writer like myself the John Murray archive is a mouth-watering prospect,” he said.