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Posts Tagged ‘children’s publishing’

Ashley Andersen Zantop Joins Capstone

Ashley Andersen Zantop will serve as group publisher and general manager at Capstone.

Zantop gave this quote in the press release: “I’m thrilled to join Capstone, a proven leader in children’s publishing for the last 20 years, and I look forward to driving product development and expanding our presence in trade, international, classroom and other markets, while maintaining our leadership position in the library market.”

Zantop has been in the industry for more than 20 years with experience in both editorial and graphic design. Her publishing career includes jobs held at Trudy Corporation and Plymouth Press.

Mediabistro Course

Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

McSweeney’s Launches Food & Children’s Books Imprints

mcsweeneys-logo.pngMcSweeney’s will launch two new imprints focused on food writing and children’s books.

According to The Bay Citizen, McSweeney’s McMullens will start with 10 children’s books this year–with four titles planned for release in May. Editor and art director Brian McMullen (the imprint’s namesake) will oversee editing, art direction, and production. McMullen explained that the books will bear this logo: “The McSweeney’s McMullens will find and publish great books — new and old — for individuals and families of all kinds.”

The food imprint, which has not yet been named, will deliver two to four titles this year. Co-publisher Chris Ying told Publisher’s Weekly: “We’re trying to make something that appeals not only to foodies, but to readers who appreciate good writing and art in general.” Ying said readers loved the food section in McSweeney’s one-issue newspaper,  San Fransisco Panorama.

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Picture Books: Fading or Flourishing?

The New York Times generated hundreds of comments last week, reporting that picture books don’t sell very well anymore.

The article offered a few explanations, including the increasing pressures of school-issued standardized testing and parents transitioning their children from picture books to chapter books at an earlier age. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers publisher Justin Chanda explained: “There’s a real push with parents and schools to have kids start reading big-kid books earlier. We’ve accelerated the graduation rate out of picture books.”

Teacher Monica Edinger offered a rebuttal in the Huffington Post. She saw an increase of chapter book presence in her fourth grade classroom after Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire came out. At the same time, she encouraged her students to read whatever it is they desired; some clung to J.K. Rowling‘s boy wizard, while others reverted back to their beloved picture books.

Edinger wrote: “So, yeah, I think there is a trend for kids to read longer books younger, at least in the sort of community I teach in. But I don’t get the sense that this causes them to abandon picture books earlier. Rather, they read both…So while kids seem to be reading chapter books younger they are also enjoying picture books when they are older. Good news, I’d say.”

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