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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Adrian’

‘The New World’ Turns Novel Into Digital Experience

thenewworldChris Adrian and Eli Horowitz, winners of the Webby & SXSW Interactive Awards for their digital novel The Silent History, have a new digital novel out from Atavist Books that pushes the boundaries of the published word.

The story and the user experience of The New World  reflect the digital experience. The book tells the tale of a tragic love story between two doctors. The storytelling concept was conceived in cyclical structure, and is comprised of three cycles. Readers can swipe between pages and follow the story in different directions based on how they swipe. The reader reads through Cycle #1 and when they are finished, the content page reappears revealing Cycle #2.

Content-wise the story in Cycle #2 moves backwards in time, as readers swipe in the opposite direction. Readers might get the sense that the book has ended with Cycle #2, but once they have completed the text, Cycle #3 appears. This section of the book is read scrolling downwards.

 

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Stephen King & Haruki Murakami on Bad Sex in Lit List

The shortlist for the Literary Review‘s annual Bad Sex in Literature Award has been released.

You can read the complete shortlist below–it includes Lee Child, Haruki Murakami and James Frey. This year the Literary Review has been active on Twitter, leading the Bad Sex Award hashtag on Twitter. Rowan Somerville won the award last year.

Literary Review has been tweeting bad sex passages online, including this scene from King’s 11-22-63: “Her head bonked on the door. ‘Ouch,’ I said. ‘Are you all right?’” (Via Huffington Post)

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Guggenheim Fellowship Winners Announced

gugg.jpgEleven fiction writers, nine poets, and twelve nonfiction authors all were awarded Guggenheim Fellowships yesterday.

In all, 180 scholars received the coveted fellowships this year–picked from over 3,000 applications. Awarded by John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the fellowships were established in 1925 in honor of US Senator Simon Guggenheim‘s son who died in 1922.

Publishers Weekly broke down the winners by genre: “Saskia Hamilton, Joseph Harrison, Terrance Hayes, Lyn Hejinian, Laura Kasischke, Barbara Ras, Lisa Russ Spaar, Larissa Szporluk, and Daniel Tobin. In fiction: Chris Abani, Chris Adrian, Stacey D’Erasmo, Ellen Feldman, John Haskell, Ken Kalfus, Marshall N. Klimasewiski, Richard Lange, Zachary Lazar, Fae Myenne Ng, and George Singleton.”

Apocalypse Literary

The LA Times’ Scott Timberg fashions a trend piece out of three recent novels dealing with life after apocalypse: Cormac McCarthy‘s THE ROAD, Chris Adrian‘s THE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL and most recently, Matthew Sharpe‘s JAMESTOWN. Add in other related fare by Carolyn See, Daniel Alarcon and David Mitchell and Timberg is right to wonder what’s in the water to produce all this end-of-the-world type of fiction.

The simple answer, Timberg says, is that the attacks of 9/11 and the Iraq war have brought a sense of unease and vulnerability to both artists and audiences. Growing worries about global warming and the greater visibility of the Christian right — Protestant fundamentalists, for whom the apocalypse is not metaphor, are thought to have swung the last two presidential elections — have brought the end of the world in from the shadows. But Steve Erickson offers a more literary viewpoint, saying this new emphasis also has to do with a blurring of lines between literary and genre fiction. “Twenty years ago, there was still an insularity to a lot of fiction, especially work put out by the New York publishing houses. It was still doing Raymond Carver and that neorealist minimalist thing. It regarded the futurism that’s kind of implicit in apocalyptic writing as kind of lowbrow.” Now, Erickson said, “there’s a new generation of writers who are more involved with other things happening in the culture.”