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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Ware’

Free Samples of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize Finalists

The finalists for the 33rd annual Los Angeles Times Book Prize have been revealed, and we’ve collected free samples of all their books below–some of the best books released in 2012. Here’s more about the awards:

“The winners of the L.A. Times book prizes will be announced at an awards ceremony April 19, the evening before the L.A. Times Festival of Books, April 20-21. Held on USC’s campus in Bovard Auditorium, the awards are open to the public; tickets will be made available in late March.”

 

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Mediabistro Course

Nonfiction Book Proposal

Nonfiction Book ProposalStarting September 4,work with a literary agent to complete a full proposal that wins an agent and a contract! Ryan Harbage from The Fischer-Harbage Agency, Inc. will teach you how to convey your idea in a winning book proposal format, write your proposal letter, understand the nuts and bolts of the nonfiction book industry, and more. Register now! 

9th Annual Morning News Tournament of Books Announced

The ninth annual Morning News Tournament of Books (ToB) will commence in March 2013.

So far, 15 finalists have been revealed. Three titles from the “pre-tournament playoff round” are currently in the running for the sixteenth and final slot. We’ve included the two lists below.

Here’s more from the announcement: “The ToB is an annual springtime event here at the Morning News, where 16 of the year’s best works of fiction enter a March Madness-style battle royale. Today we’re announcing the judges and final books for the 2013 competition as well as the long list of books from which the contenders were selected.”
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McSweeney’s Launches iPhone App

iPhonePreview.jpgMcSweeney’s, the Dave Eggers-founded publishing outfit, has entered the smartphone age with a brand new iPhone and iPod Touch app that sells for $5.99 in the Apple App store. What do you think–in a world of free literary iPhone applications (from IndieBound to Stanza, will readers pay for mobile content?

UPDATE: Yes they will… GalleyCat reader Tina Pohlman notes that the app has risen to number one on the “Top Paid App” category in the Books section of the Apple App store. According to the release, subscribing to the app will deliver six-months worth of iPhone-exclusive content, along with choice selections from the publisher’s online content site, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency. Nevertheless, the unconventional press promised to maintain a focus on “books, paper, and exploring the possibilities and challenges of our physical objects.” Upcoming projects include a prototype newspaper and pentagonal book.

Here’s more from the site: “Small Chair [is] a weekly sampler from all branches of the McSweeney’s family. One week you might receive a story from the upcoming Quarterly, the next week an interview from the Believer, the next a short film from a future Wholphin. Occasionally, it might be a song, an art portfolio, who knows. Early contributors will include Spike Jonze, Wells Tower, Chris Ware, and Jonathan Ames. This material will not be available online and is pretty sure to be good stuff.”

Granta Heads to Chicago

1253108044116.jpg“The trick now is to make literature seem urgent,” Granta Acting Editor John Freeman told a packed crowd at the Brooklyn Book fair earlier this month. In a new Chicago-themed issue, the UK-founded journal has built a literary monument to the place where President Barack Obama–our “Memoirist-in-Chief, according to Freeman–built his political career.

The new issue features a cover by graphic novelist Chris Ware, along with work by Don Delillo, Elaine Showalter, and Tony D’Souza. For UK readers, the magazine is giving away free tickets to the Small Wonder Short Story Festival this week. The new issue also includes writing by Chicago authors Aleksandar Hemon and Stuart Dybek–both interviewed on a Chicago porch for a web video feature.

Here’s an excerpt from the video: “I came to [Chicago] when I was 28. Everything I learned about living with people, about living in the world, I learned in Sarajevo … What I was looking for in Chicago was what I loved in Sarajevo. Which brings me to think you acquire a sensibility in a city. That’s where you grew up. It’s defined by that city. And this you transfer wherever you go.”

Britain Finally Embraces the Graphic Novel

Other countries, most notably America and France, may have embraced the graphic novel format and lauded several notable titles with praise, but as the New York Times’ Tara Mulholland reports, Britain was a little slower to catch on to the form. “On the Continent graphic novels have been as accepted as films or books for many years,” said the author Raymond Briggs in a 2005 interview with the newspaper The Observer, “but England has had a snobby attitude towards them. They’ve always been seen as something just for children.”

But the success of Briggs’ ETHEL & ERNEST, not to mention Chris Ware‘s surprise win of the Guardian First Book Award, has had publishers snapping up would-be graphic novel stars. Jonathan Cape, an imprint of Random House UK, has more than tripled its graphic novel output over the past year, publishing nine new titles since July 2006. Dan Franklin, Cape’s publishing director, said he hoped to increase this number. “When we started about nine years ago with ETHEL AND ERNEST I said that we wouldn’t do more than one a year,” he said. “And they’ve been so successful that I am now doing potentially up to 12 a year, if I can find them.”

Other publishers have hopped on the bandwagon and sales are on the rise. Michael Rowley, the graphic-novel buyer for Waterstone’s, Britain’s largest bookshop chain, said sales of the books had increased 41 percent in the last year alone. S what is behind this sudden wave of enthusiasm for a genre that has previously been sidelined in Britain, wonders Mulholland? For Paul Gravett, the author of GREAT BRITISH COMICS and one of the country’s foremost promoter of graphic novels, one of the primary reasons is simply the creation of the “graphic novel” category. “The word comics is laden with so many negative connotations, while the words ‘graphic novel’ give it a certain cachet,” he said.