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Posts Tagged ‘Colleen Lindsay’

How Bestselling Authors Use Email To Interact with Readers

At BookExpo America last week, Copyright Clearance Center business development director Chris Kenneally led a panel discussion called “Self-Publishing: Disruptor or Defender of the Book Business?”

You can watch the CSPAN coverage of the event online. During the session, Carina Press executive director Angela James explained how some bestselling self-published writers succeed by collecting reader emails–but not for sending spammy messages. James explained:

I would [suggest] communicating with your readers.  We have found a lot of self-published authors.  I’ve heard Bella Andre, for instance, speak to this, and also Marie Force, who’s very successful in self-publishing, talk about just the idea of responding to every reader correspondence, being out where the readers are …. I see Colleen Lindsay from Penguin practically shaking her head off – totally agree with me.  Being where your readers are and talking to them and responding to them is actually your best publicity, more than an advertisement, more than just blasting on social media.  It’s actually communicating with your readers and fostering a relationship, because they will become – I don’t like to use this term, but your street team, basically, and they will do your publicity for you.

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The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Series of Promotions at Penguin

Penguin has revealed a series of promotions in its Berkley/NAL/Perigee/Riverhead trade paper marketing department.

Book Country’s Colleen Lindsay has been promoted to associate director of marketing, social media and reader experience for the team.

She will still be a strategic advisor and continue to interact with the writing community, but the Chicago Tribune‘s Brandi Larsen (pictured) has been hired as the new director of Book Country.

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San Diego Comic-Con Etiquette for Writers

San Diego Comic-Con is an overwhelming and inspiring event, but writers need to be careful–there are unwritten rules that everyone should follow.

Over at The Swivet, Colleen Lindsay shared some Comic-Con etiquette tips for writers, editors, fans and comic professionals. The simple advice applies to any big convention, helping pros, fans and writers coexist in these crowded spaces. Check it out:

If you are a writer or an artist, don’t try to pitch your work to the booth staff. There’s a time and a place for that, and an enormous pop culture convention is not that place … If you are a writer or an artist, don’t try to pitch your work to the celebrity guests and attending pros. Trust me when I say that the people standing in line behind you waiting to meet their favorite artist or writer will NOT appreciate your whipping out your screenplay/portfolio/manuscript, and it will make the guest feel awkward as hell when they have to say no to your request. If you are a writer or an artist who has been asked to do a signing in an exhibitor’s booth, arrive on time, be gracious with the fans who come to meet you and then leave the booth when the signing is over.

Support Your Favorite University Press

What’s your favorite university press book of the year? Today Book Country’s Colleen Lindsay launched the #unipress hashtag, celebrating university presses around the country.

Here’s the original tweet: “How about some love for university press books today? What’s your favorite? Share it using the #unipress hashtag!”

This GalleyCat editor would like to send some Twitter love to the University of Michigan Press, home of the HathiTrust digital library and his alma mater.

What Are You Thankful For?

twitterlogo2323.jpgColleen Lindsay from Penguin’s Book Country launched an inspiring hashtag this morning, urging readers to share their literary thanks at the #readerthanks hashtag.

What are you thankful for? We’ve collected a few of our favorites below…

Here’s the original tweet: “It’s Thanksgiving; which writers or books are you thankful for? Share with Twitter! Use #readerthanks hashtag to participate.

Anton Strout Launches Once and Future Podcast

Novelist Anton Strout recently started the Once and Future Podcast, a new interview series that aims to fill a genre gap in the podcasting world.

The fourth episode of the series is a pre-New York Comic Con special, including conversations with novelist Drew Magary and Book Country’s Colleen Lindsay. What other genres need a comprehensive podcast?

Here’s more about the podcast: “I wanted a place where I could talk about all things happening within my chosen genre, all the things I love in fantasy, science fiction, even some crossover into paranormal romance, including weekly segments focused on: breaking news, upcoming titles, interviews with guest authors from every point in their various careers, upcoming book tour info, convention news, and just overall general discussion of our genre. Parts of the podcast will be reader focused, but there will also be parts coming up for those who are writers, including interviews with professionals of all walks of life from within the world of publishing itself.”

How To Post Your Novel on Book Country

At BEA 2011, we caught up with Book Country community manager Colleen Lindsay, collecting tips for writers who want to join the genre writing community.

If you want to explore other writing communities, check out eBookNewser’s Digital Writer Spotlight feature.

First, read and review three pieces of fiction on Book Country before posting your own work. It is required that all readers follow this rule to maintain “a community built around reciprocity.”

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BEA 2011 Cheat Sheet

It’s BookExpo America week in New York City, and we’ll have four reporters covering the event for our out-of-town readers. Follow along on our blogs or subscribe to the free newsletters for GalleyCat and eBookNewser.

For panel discussions and event information, Colleen Lindsay posted Word and Excel versions of the schedule on her blog. If you want a high tech solution, try Publishers Lunch‘s Apple app and Blackberry App for BEA. 

For professional networking, explore our How To Look for a Publishing Job at BEA post.

For galleys and author signings, you must read Barbara Hoffert‘s BEA Galley & Signing Guide.

For parties, check out Evil Wylie’s Ultimate BEA Party Guide.

Literary Agent Confidential: What It Means to be an Agent

twitterlogo2323.jpgToday Movable Type Literary Group agent Jason Allen Ashlock invited Twitter-based agents to contribute 140-character dispatches about their lives to the Twitter thread #whatitmeanstobeanagent.

The thread generated 300 responses in 90 minutes. Ashlock opened with this happy post about what it means to be an agent: “Waking up in the morning unspeakably excited about somebody else’s genius.”

Upstart Crow Literary agent Danielle Chiotti had this thought: “Saying ‘no’ to a talented author because their project isn’t right for your list.”

Caren Johnson Literary Agency agent Elana Roth cheered a recent literary trend: “Getting to put work events on your calendar called ‘Zombies and Cupcakes.’”

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How to Find an Agent for Your Urban Fantasy Novel

avatarsquare.jpgDebut novelist Allison Pang (pictured, via her Twitter avatar) recently sold her urban fantasy novel, Shadow of the Incubus–along with two sequels to the book. Pocket Books executive editor Lauren McKenna acquired the book in a four-way auction. The deal was negotiated by Colleen Lindsay from FinePrint Literary Management.

GalleyCat caught up with Pang, getting some exclusive advice about pitching an urban fantasy novel (or any novel, for that matter). “The only real advice I can give is to write the absolute best book you can and don’t send it out before it’s ready,” explained Pang. “Souring an agent on a story can be hard to come back from. Make sure the agent you’re submitting to is actively looking for what you’ve written–Twitter, Google, Facebook and agent blogs are important tools that should absolutely be utilized.”

She continued: “Read other urban fantasy books to make sure your vision is as fresh as it can be. In a heavily saturated market of vampires, werewolves and sword-wielding heroines, it can be difficult to appear unique and you want to make sure your book has every possible chance to stand out.”

After the jump, Pang offered some advice about writing pitch letters to agents.

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