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Posts Tagged ‘Conn and Hal Iggulden’

Dangerous Book for Boys To Be Filmed

Variety reported yesterday that the film rights for Conn and Hal Iggulden‘s smash hit THE DANGEROUS BOOK FOR BOYS – already the inspiration for many a knockoff – were bought by Disney and Scott Rudin in a deal worth mid-six against seven figures after heavy bidding among multiple suitors.

Disney executive vice president production and development Brigham Taylor will oversee the big-screen version of the tongue-in-cheek manual, which gives today’s coddled youth instructions on potentially hazardous activities, such as how build go-carts and make a bow and arrow. It also provides trivia, historical anecdotes and advice on life that have inspired interest from fathers and nostalgic middle-aged men.

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Dangerous Book Inspires Copycats

So Conn and Hal Iggulden‘s DANGEROUS BOOK FOR BOYS is proving to be quite the success over here after its popularity took the UK by storm last year. And because of this, reports USA TODAY’s Bob Minzesheimer, we’re about to see a slew of copycats, some of which are geared towards girls (as evident by the covers you see here.)

Collins executive Margot Schupf says similar books are “inevitable. Any success breeds copies.” It also raised the question, “What about girls?” although boys are a tougher market for publishers. Such manuals, Minzesheimer writes, strike “a chord among parents who have a nostalgic/retro longing to share with their own kids the same kind of good, old-fashioned creative play, both indoor and outdoor, that they grew up doing.

A Dangerous Path to Bestseller Status

It’s a Jeff Trachtenberg double bill at the WSJ today, and in the second half of the double feature, he looks at why Conn and Hal Iggulden‘s THE DANGEROUS BOOK FOR BOYS – first published in the UK and Australia – has not only transferred its success to America but is on track to sell millions of copies, if HarperCollins‘ projections and hopes are to be believed.

The purports to aim itself at a particularly inscrutable and un-book-friendly audience: boys around the age of 10. It tries to answer the question: What do boys need to know? The answer is that boys need a certain amount of danger and risk in their lives, and that there are certain lessons that need to be passed down from father to son, man to man. The implication is that in contemporary society basic rules of maleness aren’t being handed off as they used to be. The message is not only hitting boomer fathers but their young sons, as Knopf executive Paul Bogaards found out when he took the book home to his eight year old son, Michael. Bogaards says Michael took to it immediately, demanding that his dad test paper airplanes into the night, even missing “American Idol.” He adds: “That’s the good news. The bad news is that he now expects me to build him a treehouse.” He concludes: “Million-copy-plus seller easy, with the shelf life of Hormel Spam.”

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Selling Proofs Not the Best Idea for Publishing Employees

The Telegraph’s Mark Sanderson reports on HarperCollins UK‘s woes with some of its employees getting Ebay-happy selling proof copies of various novels. The trouble started when it was noticed that proof copies of Conn and Hal Iggulden‘s bestselling DANGEROUS BOOK FOR BOYES were being offered at the astonishing price of £80.

The legal department, determined to put an end to this nice little earner, sent round a global email asking if any employees had a PayPal account (which enables money to be sent electronically) so that they could buy the copies and thus find out who the culprits were. The guilty parties failed to see the writing on the screen, did not withdraw their wares from eBay, and were duly caught. To which we say, some folks really do get the fate they deserve….