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Posts Tagged ‘Curtis Sittenfeld’

Figment Launches Email Writing Prompts

Figment, the writing community for young adult readers, has launched a digital muse called “Figment Daily Themes.” This free email service provides “carefully crafted writing prompts” five times a week to encourage users to write everyday.

Here’s more from the announcement: “Whether you’re getting back into the practice of writing or already a dedicated daily scribe, these prompts will push you to work on the range of your craft, focusing on character, setting, dialogue, personal essay, verse, and more. (And we’ll feature occasional prompts from some of our favorite professional authors like Lev Grossman, Curtis Sittenfeld, and Dana Goodyear!)”

Figment Daily Themes will run from January 2nd until March 30th. To sign up, enter your contact information in the box at the bottom of the blog announcement.

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Literary Journal Meets Thrift Store

so.jpgLike a Salvation Army staffed by brilliant writers, Significant Objects has created a new kind of online journal–publishing and selling on eBay.

The new site pairs a writer with an odd object–a mug, a child’s game, or a ceramic cat. The author writes a story about the object, and the object and story are sold on eBay to the highest bidder. The amazing author list includes Luc Sante, Lydia Millet, Ben Greenman, Curtis Sittenfeld, and Stewart O’Nan.

Here’s more from the site: “The winning bidder is mailed the significant object, along with a printout of the object’s fictional story. Net proceeds from the sale are given to the respective author. Authors retain all rights to their stories.”

Department of Publishing Obvious: Nobody Knows Anything

sittenfeld-bookscan2.jpg

Wow, I’m sure the entire world needed the New York Times business section to tell them that the publishing industry doesn’t work like every other business because oops, they can’t really predict bestsellers and big advances don’t always correlate to big sales and small advances can break wide and all the other tropes and cliches associated with this wonderfully amorphous world we exist in. Or as Janklow & Nesbit‘s Eric Simonoff said that whenever he discusses the book industry with people in other industries, “they’re stunned because it’s so unpredictable, because the profit margins are so small, the cycles are so incredibly long, and because of the almost total lack of market research.”

Really, about the only new thing I learned was that Curtis Sittenfeld got $40K for the two book deal that would result in PREP and MAN OF MY DREAMS, which a) was more than I expected b) a pretty good investment by Random House.