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Posts Tagged ‘David Foster Wallace’

Blank on Blank Creates the ‘Tom Robbins on Jitterbugs’ Video

The Blank on Blank organization has created an animated video starring Even Cowgirls Get the Blues author Tom Robbins. The video embedded above features outtakes from a previously unheard interview conducted with Tod Mesirow that took place in 1994. In the past, the producers behind this YouTube channel made pieces about I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings memoirist Maya Angelou, Where the Wild Things Are creator Maurice Sendak, and Infinite Jest novelist David Foster Wallace.

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Blank on Blank Creates the ‘Maya Angelou On Con Men’ Video

The Blank on Blank organization has created an animated video starring I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings memoirist Maya Angelou. The video embedded above features an unheard interview that took place in 1970 between the late author and Pulitzer Prize-winning nonfiction writer Louis “Studs” Terkel. In the past, the producers behind this YouTube channel made pieces about Where the Wild Things Are author Maurice Sendak and Infinite Jest novelist David Foster Wallace.

Actor Jason Segel to Play David Foster Wallace in a Film Adaptation

www.randomhouseActors Jesse Eisenberg and Jason Segel will star in a film adaptation project entitled The End of the Tour. The movie script was inspired by the title, Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip With David Foster Wallace.

According to The Wrap, the screenplay was penned by playwright Donald Margulies. Segel will take on the role of The Pale King author David Foster Wallace. Eisenberg will play David Lipsky, the Rolling Stone magazine journalist who wrote the book.

Here’s more from The Wrap: “Story finds Lipsky accompanying Wallace across the country on a book tour promoting Infinite Jest, just as Wallace starts to become famous. Along the way, jealousy and competition bubbles up between the two writers as they discuss women, depression and the pros and cons of fame.” (via Entertainment Weekly)

Infinite Jest Reader Chops Out Page Numbers

As you can see by the photograph embedded above, one reader surgically removed all the page numbers while reading David Foster Wallace‘s imposing Infinite Jest.

“Today I broke through the chains of oppression. No longer will page numbers tyrannize my life. I… have taken action,” they explained. Readers had mixed reactions to this unusual way to finish a book–are you horrified or impressed? One reader wrote:

“I saw this and almost had a panic attack. Why are page numbers so bad? What did your book ever do to deserve this treatment?!”

David Foster Wallace Letters & Manuscript Sold for $125,000

A package of letters, envelopes and a short story manuscript by the late David Foster Wallace sold for $125,000 at Sothebys.

The correspondence were  all addressed to author and writing professor Richard Elman during the mid-1980s. You can read more about Elman’s career here.  Sothebys has more about the collection:

Archive of 21 letters, 1 postcard and 41 pp. photocopy typescript manuscript for the short story “Little Expressionless Animals” with manuscript notes on title page, comprising both ALS and TLS (“David Wallace”) or “David” ) together 24 pages of correspondence (generally 11 x 8 1/2 in; 328 x 215 mm). many on letterhead with original mailing envelopes written from University of Arizona, New York and Amhers, circa 23 September 1985 to 12 November 1987 to his writing professor Richard Elman; few fold lines but generally excellent condition.

(Via Michael Orthofer)

David Foster Wallace’s ‘This is Water’ Speech in Short Film

The Glossary has created a short film incorporating an abridged version of David Foster Wallace‘s “This is Water” commencement speech.

We’ve embedded the project above–what do you think? Follow this link to listen to the address in its entirety.

Wallace originally delivered this speech in 2005 during Kenyon College’s graduation ceremony. Little, Brown and Company reprinted it in a 2009 book entitled This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life.

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Celebrate David Foster Wallace’s Birthday With Your Thesaurus

wallace.jpgThe late David Foster Wallace was born on February 21, 1962, so today is a good day to remember that you can get some free writing advice from the great novelist while working on your computer.

Every Mac computer contains a copy of the Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus, a powerful tool for writers that features extra “word notes” from Wallace and a number of other authors, including Rae Armantrout, Joshua Ferris, Francine Prose, Zadie Smith and Simon Winchester.

Author Dave Madden explained how to access the extra material in a post: “It’s part of the built-in dictionary. Type in a word, click on ‘Thesaurus’ in the little bar above, and you’ll get the word-for-word entry from this book I paid money for … Here, as a public service, is the list of words with notes by DFW: as, all of, beg, bland, critique, dialogue, dysphesia, effete, feckless, fervent, focus, hairy, if, impossibly, individual, loan, mucous, myriad, noma (at canker), privilege, pulchritude (at beauty), that, toward, unique, utilize.”

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Free eBooks for Your New iPad, Kindle or Nook

Readers around the globe have unwrapped new tablets and eReaders this holiday season. Below, we’ve included a long, long, long list of free and legal eBooks you can download right now for any device.

Explore our Project Gutenberg lists and click “read this eBook online” to sample the book without downloading anything.

If you have an iPad, iPad Mini, iPhone or iPod Touch, you can download the ePub edition. If you have a Kindle or a Kindle Fire, you need to download the Kindle edition. If you have a Nook, Sony eReader or a Kobo, you should download the ePub edition.

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Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace Is Currently $4 on Amazon, B&N and iTunes

AmazonBarnes & Noble and Apple are running $4 sale on David Foster Wallace‘s masterpiece, Infinite Jest.

As of this 5:23 p.m. ET writing, the same book currently costs $8.89 on Google Play and $9.99 on Kobo. This week, Hachette dropped the agency model for eBook pricing, allowing digital book marketplaces to price books as they wish. Will we see eBook price wars without these price restrictions?

paidContent has more about the new eBook contracts: “Hachette’s new contracts with ebook retailers following the publisher’s September settlement with the Department of Justice are now place. As of Tuesday, Amazon had begun discounting some Hachette ebooks slightly; today, the discounts are larger, and Google and Barnes & Noble is discounting as well. Apple is not discounting the ebooks yet.” (link via ohhaiworld)

David Foster Wallace Archive Now Includes Drafts of The Pale King

The Harry Ransom Center announced that literary scholars can now examine a trove of drafts and materials from David Foster Wallace‘s unfinished and final novel, The Pale King.

Follow this link to view digital copies of six drafts of one section from this new collection (image embedded above). The Center acquired the six boxes of materials, but Little, Brown and Co. kept the papers until after the paperback edition was published. Check it out:

The Pale King materials fill six boxes and  include handwritten and typescript drafts, outlines, characters lists, research materials and a set of notebooks containing reading notes, names, snippets of dialog, definitions, quotations and clippings. The materials have been organized according to a spreadsheet developed by Wallace’s editor, Michael Pietsch. Pietsch, then-executive vice president and publisher of Little, Brown and Co., spent months reading through and organizing the material and found what he called “an astonishingly full novel, created with the superabundant originality and humor that were uniquely David’s.” (Image via David Foster Wallace Literary Trust)

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