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Posts Tagged ‘Doubleday’

Doubleday Seeks Talented Marketing Manager

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group is hiring! The company is currently looking for a new marketing manager to focus on the Doubleday imprint.

Here, you’ll create, implement and manage creative campaigns that market titles internally, to the trade and to consumers. You’ll work closely with sales team on account-specific programs, which may include content development, creation of flyers, brochures and special mailings. You’ll develop relationships with on and offline partners, and contribute to e-newsletters and social media. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Food Writing

Food WritingStarting October 8, work with the food features editor at Everyday with Rachel Ray to develop your portfolio! Gabriella Gershenson will teach you how how to write a successful food piece, conceive story ideas, land assignments to get attention from foodies, and build authority in the food writing community. Register now!

Phyllis Grann To Retire from Doubleday

Editor Phyllis Grann will retire from her position at Doubleday. In a letter written by editor-in-chief Sonny Mehta, he praised Grann “as a brilliant editor and savvy businesswoman.”

Grann has worked in publishing for four decades. Prior to Doubleday, she held editorial positions at William Morrow, Simon & Schuster, and Penguin Group (USA). She has worked with several celebrated authors including Tom Clancy, Judy Blume, and Patricia Cornwell.

Grann explained: “Doubleday has allowed me to continue doing what I love. And as much as I have enjoyed the work, I now feel it is time to step back.” Following her last day on June 9th, she will be available as a consultant and freelance editor.

It’s Deja Vu All Over Again

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Doubleday recently posted the cover art for the new J. California Cooper novel, Life Is Short But Wide, and it seems the design team pulled up the same photo from the Getty Images archives that HarperCollins used three years ago for Jeffrey Ford‘s Edgar-winning The Girl in the Glass. If you look closely, you can spot the three main differences: When Georgia Liebman designed the cover to The Girl in the Glass back in ’05, she added, well, a girl in the glass, along with a blue butterfly—and, as far as my untrained eye can see, those two pairs of shoes in the Doubleday cover appear to have been put in by that illustration’s designer. (But I could be wrong—UPDATE: And no less an authority than Jeffrey Ford writes in to correct me: “I believe the boots were actually original to the photo, because Harper Collins originally showed it to me with the boots, and I asked them to remove them as there are no boots in the story.”)

The original photograph was taken by the late Debra McClinton, who committed suicide last year by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge. This weekend, San Francisco’s Gallery 291 showed a memorial exhibition.

Scott Moyers Won’t Be A Junior Jackal

The Observer’s Leon Nayfakh catches up with former book editor Scott Moyers, now comfortably ensconced within the Wylie Agency as a literary agent. In the last month alone, Moyers has sold books to Doubleday, Scribner, Random House and the Penguin Press. Not a bad opening month, Neyfakh comments, though having worked as an editor at all four of those houses may have come in handy – as does working with the man famously known for poaching clients that his nickname, “The Jackal,” pretty much says it all.

Many of Moyers’ colleagues in the industry say they’re pleased for him about his new gig. But a few fear that between the personal loyalty that Moyers commands from many of the writers he’s edited, and Wylie’s formidable existing stable of talent (Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie and Martin Amis are but a few of the 600-plus author on the overall client list) and no-holds-barred recruiting tactics, the pair could create a juggernaut with the ability to raid the rosters of smaller competitors. Or, as one competitor puts it: “The question for Scott is, if you swim with the sharks, are you going to become one of the sharks?”

Not surprisingly, Moyers disagrees with any such notions. “I am not making it my business to think in those terms or be predatory,” he told Neyfakh. “There is so much good work to do. I think, like all agents, if something happens organically-if one is approached, if something makes sense, then so be it. I’m not going to be morbidly squeamish in a kind of way that doesn’t make sense. But I am going to be straightforward and open.” And he’s generally amused by any speculation about potential poaching and shark-swimming. “I thank them for their concern, for their solicitude. I’m moved by their empathy,” he said. “I ask them to give me a soul X-ray a year from now, and if I have black spots on the lungs of my soul, then, you know, they can just rush me to the infirmary and fill me up with drugs. But I somehow think it’s going to be okay.”

Pelosi to Pen Memoir for Doubleday

PW Daily reports that Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House of Representatives, has signed with Doubleday to publishe her memoir. The deal for North American rights was made by Doubleday president and publisher Stephen Rubin, who acquired the untitled work from a trio of the William Morris Agency‘s top executives: chairman Norman Brokaw; vp and co-head of the agency, Jennifer Rudolph Walsh; and senior vp and president Mel Berger.

The memoir will be published in the summer of 2008 and Pelosi’s collaborator is yet to be determined. It will focus on the Speaker’s remarkable life both personally and professionally. “When Nancy Pelosi, surrounded by her six grandchildren, took the gavel as the first female Speaker of the House in January 2007, it was an historic moment in our nation’s history,” Rubin said. “She stood there as wife, mother, grandmother and political leader; her ascension and remarkable career have put the lie to the notion that those roles are in any way in conflict. How she managed to serve her country without compromising her family is a story both fascinating and inspirational, and Doubleday is proud to be publishing it.”

Faulks Confirmed as Author of Centenary Bond Novel

Score one for MI6, who correctly predicted that Sebastian Faulks, most recently the author of ENGELBY, is the newest author aboard the James Bondenterprise. DEVIL MAY CARE is scheduled to be published on May 28, 2008 – just in time for the 100th anniversary of Ian Fleming‘s birth – by Penguin in the UK and Doubleday in the US. Doubleday president and publisher Steve Rubin bought US rights from Gillon Aitken with Deb Futter to edit.

“Three pages into DEVIL MAY CARE and you are immediately thrown back into the world of James Bond and all those wonderful characters we have come to love,” Rubin said in the announcement, reprinted on Doubleday Broadway’s official blog. “DEVIL MAY CARE is pure Fleming channeled by Faulks – a madcap adventure, a romantic romp and a book you can devour in one sitting. It all starts in Paris, and no one alive writes better about Paris than Sebastian Faulks.”

The book will be set in 1967, when, Faulks said yesterday, “Bond is damaged, ageing and in a sense it is the return of the gunfighter for one last heroic mission”. His own interpretation of the spy, he hinted, would show all the caddishness of Bond’s previous incarnations, tempered with just a shade of new-mannish sensitivity. He has been widowed and been through a lot of bad things … He is slightly more vulnerable than any previous Bond but at the same time he is both gallant and highly sexed, if you can be both. Although he is a great seducer, he really does appreciate the girls he seduces and he doesn’t actually use them badly.”

Are Serials Good for Your Publishing Health?

The New York Times’ Joanne Kaufman wonders if first serial rights – once so coveted by magazines that they were willing to pay six figures for the privilege of publishing exclusive excerpts from a highly anticipated book – have lost their luster. After all, when many such excerpts give away the juiciest bits of the book, why bother spending $25 for the rest, which may or may not live up to expectations?

Kaufman explains that magazine editors who five years ago would have reflexively bid for first serial rights to certain high-profile books are now exploring their options, choosing instead to run a feature about the book or an interview with the author. Some magazines – Time and Harper’s in particular – have turned to asking authors to write an article or essay that touches on issues raised in their book. “I think the whole model needs to be rethought,” said Richard Stengel, the managing editor of Time. “I’m less interested in buying headlines than a great reader experience.” PW’s Sara Nelson finds the disinterest extends to publishers. “I see more and more of them interested in the TV interview for their author rather than the book excerpt because TV has a greater reach than magazines.”

But even if excerpts may contribute to book sale decreases and magazines themselves aren’t what they used to be, not all share the doom and gloom. Alison Rich, the director of publicity at Doubleday, said she had no such concerns with regards to Tina Brown‘s just-published THE DIANA CHRONICLES – excerpted first in Vanity Fair. “Tina’s writing is extraordinary,” Rich said. “The book is an incredibly rich textured portrait of Diana and all the royals, and it’s our belief that readers will be anxious for more.”

Grisham’s Latest Bestseller Slated for September

The AP reported yesterday that John Grisham‘s next novel is slated for a September publication from Doubleday – and is a departure from his usual courtroom setting. PLAYING FOR PIZZA is the story of an American quarterback trying his luck in Italy. “I was pleasantly surprised to find real American football in Italy,” Grisham said in a statement issued by Doubleday, “and as I dug deeper, a novel came together. The research was tough – food, wine, opera, football, Italian culture – but someone had to do it.” The book following PLAYING FOR PIZZA, out in Spring 2008, will see Grisham back in the courtroom.

Bookspan Bloodbath

bookspanlogo.gifPW Daily reports that a mere six weeks after it acquired complete ownership of Bookspan, Bertelsmann has initiated a major overhaul of the book club business, a process that will eliminate 280 positions, or about 15% of its workforce of 1,900. As part of integrating Bookspan into BMG Columbia House, an unspecified number of smaller clubs will be closed, including American Compass, InsightOut Book Club and Behavioral Science Book Service, as will Madison Park Press, the publishing program launched about 18 months ago. Madison Park’s staff, including editor Christine Zika, will be let go but the fate of its publisher, Carole Baron, remained unclear as of this time. However, since Baron is also acting in an at-large capacity with Knopf (most recently acquiring the debut novel from Poppy Adams) it’s possible her duties there may increase in the wake of Bookspan’s new plans.

“A number of small, specialized clubs will either be combined with another book club or phased out by the end of 2007,” says company spokeswoman Paula Batson. “This realignment will enable the company to focus its assets and efforts on its core book club brands such as Book-of-the-Month, Doubleday, Black Expressions, Crossings and The Literary Guild as well as its music and DVD club businesses.” The clubs will be phased out over the rest of the year and members will be given the chance to transfer to a different club. Books from some clubs will also be made available through the general interest and other specialized clubs.

Department of Obvious: No New Dan Brown Book in 2007

For the two or three people who believed Dan Brown would follow up THE DA VINCI CODE with something new in 2007, the Bookseller throws ice-cold water in your face. They only speak to the UK marketplace, but one would assume the same applies over here, since Doubleday will probably have first dibs on the finished manuscript over any other foreign territory.

Transworld publisher Larry Finlay said a Da Vinci follow-up had been budgeted in for 2007 but that Brown had yet to send any material. “It is in the budget, but it was in the budget last year. There is still a chance it will be this year; we just don’t know. He’ll deliver, I am sure, but I don’t know when. It will be published when it’s published.” Which is a lovely way of saying there’s no news, there’s no news on when there will be news, and the news of their being news will be news…eventually. How Rumsfeld-ian.

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