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Posts Tagged ‘Douglas Preston’

Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child, & Elin Hilderbrand Join Hachette Reading Group Day

Hachette Book Group is hosting the “Hachette Reading Group Day” on Saturday, September 7th. More than a dozen authors spanning a range of genres will participate.

Thriller writers Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child will deliver the opening keynote. Beautiful Day author Elin Hilderbrand will give the closing speech.

The publisher has enlisted McNally Jackson, a New York City-based independent bookstore, to serve as the ticket and book vendor for this event. Each ticket costs $50.00 and includes a light breakfast, lunch, and a swag bag full of books.

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George Clooney to Star in Adaptation of Douglas Preston & Mario Spezi Book

The Monster of Florence   by, Douglas Preston , Mario Spezi  Actor George Clooney will star in an adaptation of Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi‘s nonfiction book, The Monster of Florence. Valkyrie screenwriters Christopher McQuarrie and Nathan Alexander will team up to work on the script.

Grand Central Publishing released the nonfiction book in 2008. According to The Hollywood ReporterTom Cruise was originally slated to star in the movie–Cruise recruited McQuarrie for the project.

Here’s more about the book: “Preston and Spezi’s book is an investigation into the murderer (or murderers) known as Il Mostro, who killed more than a dozen people from the late 1960s to the mid-1980s without being caught. In the course of their digging, Preston, who had moved with his family to a villa in Florence, and Spezi, an Italian crime journalist, were themselves then investigated by the police.”

Hachette Offers Digital Review Copies on NetGalley

hachette.jpgHachette Book Group (HBG) has joined with NetGalley to organize the distribution of HBG information and products. Through this deal, select reviewers, press, and booksellers will be given access to digital press kits and digital galleys.

Several enhancements will be included with the galleys such as video, audio, tour schedules, author Q&As and photos. The galleys will be readable on Kindle, Nook, Sony eReader, Kobo or a desktop.

Here’s more from the release: “The Hachette Book Group titles in NetGalley will expand in the coming months, but you can browse current Hachette Book Group galleys right now, from these imprints: Center Street (enriching & life-affirming fiction & non-fiction) FaithWords (inspirational, faith-building fiction & non-fiction) Grand Central Publishing (mainstream fiction & non-fiction) Little, Brown and Company (mainstream fiction & non-fiction) Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (fiction & non-fiction for children & young adults) Mulholland Books (mystery & suspense) Orbit (science fiction & fantasy).”

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Michael Bay Slated to Produce Upcoming Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child Adaptation

pc23.jpgParamount bought the rights to the is the first book of the upcoming Gideon Crew series written by bestselling authors Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child. Grand Central Publishing will release the first novel of the series, Gideon’s Sword, in February.

Variety has the scoop: “In what’s said to be a seven-figure deal, Paramount has picked up Gideon’s Sword, optioning the upcoming novel for Michael Bay to produce through Bay Films.” One year ago, Bay bought the rights James Frey‘s upcoming YA novel, I Am Number Four.

Here’s more about the Preston & Child partnership (pictured, via kramerimages): “In the early 1990s Preston and Child teamed up to write suspense novels; Relic was the first, followed by several others, including Riptide and Thunderhead. Relic was released as a motion picture by Paramount in 1997. Other films are under development at Hollywood studios. Preston and Child live 500 miles apart and write their books together via telephone, fax, and the Internet.”

Large Hadron Collider in Book Reviews

lhc.jpgThis morning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) broke world records for smashing together elementary particles at high levels of energy–a physics project that has inspired a generation of authors with doomsday scenarios.

That photo (via CERN) shows scientists reacting to the experiment. To celebrate, GalleyCat Reviews rounded up reviews of books that use the Large Hadron Collider as plot device. Most famously, novelist Dan Brown wrote an apocalyptic scenario in Angels and Demons.

Here’s Janet Maslin‘s breathless review: “With ‘Angels and Demons,’ Mr. Brown introduced Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor of art history and religious symbology who is loaded with ‘what his female colleagues referred to as an ‘erudite’ appeal.’ No wonder: the new book finds the enormously likable Langdon pondering antimatter, the big-bang theory, the cult of the Illuminati and a threat to the Vatican, among other things.”

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GalleyCat Reviews: Amazon & Macmillan Edition

highsmith23.jpgThe Amazon and Macmillan standoff over eBook prices has almost lasted an entire week, and the online bookseller still has not reactivated the buy direct from Amazon buttons for many of Macmillan’s authors (as of this 4:11 p.m. EST writing). To help these writers stuck in the middle of a corporate struggle, GalleyCat Reviews has rounded up reviews of books from various Macmillan imprints.

First up, the great Jeanette Winterson reviewed The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith Joan Schenkar for the NY Times: “Schenkar has a wonderfully bold approach: not worrying about a linear chronology (although this is meticulously supplied in the appendices), but choosing instead to follow the emotional watercourse of Highsmith’s life, allowing her subject to find her own level–to be tidal, sullen, to flow without check, so that events in one decade naturally make an imaginative tributary into turbulence ­before and after.”

Next, here’s a New Yorker review of The Girl with Glass Feet by Ali Shaw: “In this wintry fable, Ida Maclaird finds her feet crystallizing into glass … The book is filled with winsome details of ‘this place and its people, as stilted and monochrome as sets and stars of precolor TV.’ But the characters’ naive inner lives, and the novel’s earnest sentimentality, can make the conceit feel as transparent as Ida’s transparent toes.”

Here’s an excerpt from a Library Journal review of Impact by Douglas Preston: “A young woman in Maine sees a meteorite streak through the sky and decides to find the crater. A scientist working on Mars data finds something so startling that he is murdered to keep the information secret … The thriller elements mix well with the science aspects of the story, and the author makes even the hard-to-grasp concepts easy to understand. Most readers will consume this in one sitting; not to be missed.”

Finally, for your weekend reading pleasure, the LA Times reviews Hellraisers: The Life and Inebriated Times of Richard Burton, Richard Harris, Peter O’Toole and Oliver Reed by Robert Sellers Dig it: “What you’ve got in this book is an incredibly entertaining series of anecdotes, interspersed with unpretentious and conversational interviews — all about drinking … Most of the stories are outrageously funny, although, like the ones you’re likely to hear from the guy on the next stool at your local, they may be a bit manicured.”

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