InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘drawings’

Chris Van Allsburg on Picture Book Writing

More than 25 years ago, children’s author Chris Van Allsburg published The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, a collection of 14 mysterious illustrations.

For The Chronicles of Harris Burdick, Van Allsburg teamed up with thirteen fellow writers to create short stories inspired by these drawings. The group of authors include Sherman Alexie, M.T. Anderson, Kate DiCamillo, Cory Doctorow, Jules Feiffer, Stephen King, Tabitha King, Lois Lowry, Gregory Maguire, Walter Dean Myers, Linda Sue Park, Louis Sachar, Jon Scieszka and an introduction by Lemony Snicket.

This powerhouse group of writers has collectively won one Pulitzer Prize, three National Book Awards, five Newbery Medals and several Caldecotts.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Nonfiction Book Proposal

Nonfiction Book ProposalStarting September 4,work with a literary agent to complete a full proposal that wins an agent and a contract! Ryan Harbage from The Fischer-Harbage Agency, Inc. will teach you how to convey your idea in a winning book proposal format, write your proposal letter, understand the nuts and bolts of the nonfiction book industry, and more. Register now! 

Sylvia Plath Drawings Displayed at Mayor Gallery

Today would have been Sylvia Plath‘s 79th birthday. In her honor, Flavorpill has posted up sixteen images from the book Sylvia Plath: Her Drawings and Dadamaino: Volumes.

With the blessing of Plath’s daughter, Frieda Hughes, 44 of Plath’s pen and ink drawings will be displayed in London’s Mayor Gallery for the first time. The exhibit will last from November 2nd until December 16th. According to Flavorpill, the drawings range from French street life to scenes from the Spanish countryside. In the image embedded above (via), Plath drew a kiosk near the Louvre museum.

In a guest piece for The Guardian, Hughes explained: “Although my mother is known primarily for her semi-autobiographical novel The Bell Jar and her poetry – particularly her last collection, Ariel, published posthumously in 1965 following her suicide on 11 February 1963 – her passion for art permeated her short life. Her early letters and diary notes and poems were often heavily decorated, and she hoped that her drawings would illustrate the articles and stories that she wrote for publication.” What do you think of Plath’s drawings?

NEA Launches ‘Blue Horse’ Charity Auction to Benefit Arts Education

The National Education Association (NEA) has teamed up with the NEA Foundation to host “The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse Charity Auction.”

The proceeds derived from the Internet auction will benefit the NEA Foundation’s “Art Inspires Learning, Learning Inspires Art” initiative. This project funds arts education grants for teachers. Follow this link to check out the artwork.

Here’s more from the release: “This initiative was inspired by Eric Carle‘s picture book The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, which celebrates imagination and artistic freedom. Each donated piece of art will feature that artist’s interpretation of a horse and celebrates imagination and the many and varied ways that each artist sees the world around him/her. The auction will include three waves of art: Group 1 will take place October 17th-27th. Group 2 will take place October 31st-November 10th. Group 3 will take place November 14th-24th.”

Read more

Children Remember 9/11 in New Book

Assouline Publishing will commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11 with the release of Art for Heart: Remember 9/11. The book features a collection of drawings created by young children shortly after the terrorist attacks.

All of the proceeds will be donated to the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, a not-for-profit organization that operates the memorial and museum at Ground Zero. Museum director Alice M. Greenwald wrote the introduction and political journalist Christy Ferer wrote the forward.

Here’s more from the release: “In Art for Heart, the innocence so profoundly disrupted that day is nowhere better demonstrated than in the words and drawings created by children following the attacks. Straightforward and heartfelt, these works reveal the human instinct to bear witness, provide comfort, and attempt to make sense out of the unthinkable.”