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Posts Tagged ‘Dwight Garner’

What Is Your Favorite Kind of Pen?

Despite all our fancy digital tools, the good old-fashioned ink pen is still a writer’s best friend. What’s your favorite kind of pen? Add it to our new favorite pen hashtag.

Today New York Times book critic Dwight Garner asked his loyal Twitter users for pen suggestions, receiving an avalanche of ink-stained suggestions. We’ve collected the recommendations below…

This GalleyCat editor prefers the black Pilot Precise V7 Rolling Ball pen, an affordable pen that produces a strong, solid line with the occasional satisfying ink blot.

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Mediabistro Course

Fashion Writing

Fashion WritingStarting September 23, work with the contributing editor at ELLE.com to get your writing published in fashion magazines and websites! In this course, you'll learn how to write fashion headlines, runway reviews, and fashion features, write compelling pitch letters, and gain insight into the fashion industry. Register now!

Dwight Garner Collects Public Speaking Advice on Twitter

What’s the best public speaking advice you’ve ever received?

Many writers are a solitary people, making author readings and lectures challenging–but these are all important ways to promote your work.

Today New York Times book critic and Read Me author Dwight Garner (pictured, via) asked his thousands of Twitter followers for public speaking advice. We’ve collected the useful tips in a Storify post below…

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Talk to the Animals for Publishing Succcess

Cats and dogs and elephants and lions and tigers…okay, the last two haven’t figured into bestselling novels or non-fiction yet, but maybe that’s just a matter of time, if one continues the trend line pinpointed in Dwight Garner‘s piece in the New York Times’ Week in Review section, which he claims he wouldn’t have written if he’d not found out about Sara Gruen‘s $5 million deal for THE APE HOUSE in last week’s article by Motoko Rich (even though it’s been common knowledge for, I dunno, months?)

Anyway, Garner wants to know why the American reading public is so animal-crazy. “Americans have become existentially lonely,” said Jon Katz, author of DOG DAYS. “We’re disconnected from nature and from the animal parts of ourselves. We’re living in cities and we’re generally frustrated by our work and dissatisfied with politics, technology and religion, all of which have mostly failed to uplift us as promised. So we’ve been turning to animals for companionship and love and emotional support.” Of course, some of those offerings – coughcoughJONATHAN LIVINGSTON SEAGULLcoughcough – might not be the best examples of what Katz is talking about, but as Garth Stein‘s book deal illustrates, animals are still very, very hot in publishing.

More NYT Books Coverage

For some reason there’s been a boatload of books-related coverage at the New York Times, including:

  • Paul Vitello on a long-standing book club in Long Island
  • Dwight Garner celebrating Mary McCarthy‘s birthday
  • And the obligatory annoying review from Janet Maslin that gives away a big fat spoiler that doesn’t even come into play in the book till about, oh, 300 pages in. Gee thanks, Lady Maslin.
  • A Further Look Inside the NYTBR

    The Queens College Knightly News‘ Literary Editor, Michael Orbach, recently spent a day at the New York Times’ Book Review Offices, interviewing editor-in-chief Sam Tanenhaus as well as editors Dwight Garner & Rachel Donadio and frequent contributor Liesl Schillinger. Much of the information isn’t new (the fiction/non-fiction disparity; how books are chosen; favorite authors) and the inevitable litblog question is asked of everyone (Donadio kindly namechecks GalleyCat as a resource “to guide me to interesting stories in the world press that I might otherwise have missed”; all but Tanenhaus, who somehow manages to know exactly what blogs are saying about the TBR without reading them – a remarkable feat of psychic ability or hypocrisy, depending on your standpoint – say they check in anywhere from occasionally to once or twice a week) but Orbach does manage to get Tanenhaus to speak of how the Book Review functions within a working newspaper:

    Remember, we’re folded inside a big newspaper, or people go to the homepage, the webpage, and find us, so we’re a small slice within the newspaper. That’s a lot of what our role is: in a sense, to cover books, in addition to what the daily newspaper does; our writers have more room, somewhat more time, but that’s all it is, to give a snapshot of the literary world on any given moment.

    Ron adds: Tanenhaus may be drawing the heat for his remarks about the blogosphere, but I thought it was Garner who laid out his viewpoint most concisely: “A lot of the stuff that’s out there is almost comically vicious; it’s sort of a race to the bottom, to see who can belch out the ugliest possible thing in the grossest possible way.” (Of course, when pressed on the matter, some would say that they were being satirical.) What interested me, though, were the insights into the interviewee’s literary perspectives, like Schillinger’s efforts to read books for fun on the side, or Donadio’s admiration for South African literature now that, in her view, “Europe is over, its intellectual class engaged with the past.” If there’s any money left in the travel budget, I for one would love to hear what she has to say about the scene in India