FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘eBook’

LeVar Burton on the Future of Reading Rainbow & Printed Books

Who didn’t love Reading Rainbow as a kid?  The iconic 80s show used songs, celebrities and video to actually make literature fun. Well, times they are a changin’, says the show’s onetime host, LeVar Burton.

“Television was the medium and the technology of its time in the 80s and 90s, but you know better than I do that this is the digital-native generation,” he explained in our latest Media Beat interview. “And they consume most of their screen time on mobile devices. That’s where we wanna be. If you want to be where they are, you’ve gotta be on a mobile device.”

Furthermore, Burton said, the days of printed books are also numbered. ”We’re looking at a future, whenever it comes, that we’re gonna consume most of the reading that we do on some kind of electronic device or another. We will still have printed books; they’ll never go away. I think our emotional attachment to them is too strong. What it will do, I believe though, is make the books that we own more valuable to us, more precious.”

(And watch the full interview for a freakin’ awesome homage to that beloved RR theme song.)

Part 2: LeVar Burton: By not focusing on reading, “We’re sacrificing our kids”
Part 3: LeVar Burton on How Science Fiction Influences Technology

Mediabistro Course

Memoir Writing

Memoir WritingStarting January 7, work with a published memoir writer to tell and sell the story of your life! In this course, Wendy Dale will teach you how to create your story around a marketable premise, hone your narrative voice, write a memoir with a solid structure, and sell your memoir before you've even finished writing it. Register now!

Random House Releases Dr. Seuss Drawing App

Random House Children’s Books has released a digital coloring book app from the Dr. Seuss collection.

The Dr. Suess’ Cat in the Hat Color & Create app features classic Dr. Suess characters like the Cat in the Hat, Sally, Nick and Fish. With the app,  young readers can digitally color, take photos, throw digital confetti and create effects. The new activity app is currently on sale for $1.99.

Dr. Seuss apps have done well in iTunes. Digital publisher Oceanhouse Media has released a number of eBook versions of the classic kids books, many of which have ranked on iTunes top list. According to data from AppData, Oceanhouse Media’s The Cat in the Hat eBook app is currently the No. 49 top free app in the books genre and the No. 31 top free iPad app in the books genre.

Authors Sue Harlequin Enterprises for eBook Royalties

A few authors have filed a class action suit against the romance publisher Harlequin Enterprises and two European corporations it created. We’ve embedded a copy of the complaint below.

UPDATE: Harlequin publisher Donna Hayes responded: “Our authors have been recompensed fairly and properly for their work, and we will be defending ourselves vigorously.” The company added that “this is the first it has heard of the proceedings and that a complaint has not yet been served.”

The suit alleges that the publisher owes some authors eBook royalties from contracts signed between 1990 and 2004. During those years, these authors “entered agreements” with a Swiss corporation created by the romance publisher.

The lawsuit outlined the problem: “However, Harlequin, before and after the signing of these agreements, performed all the publishing functions related to the agreements, including exercising, selling, licensing, or sublicensing the e-book rights granted by the authors. Instead of paying the authors a royalty of 50% of its net receipts as required by the agreements, an intercompany license was created by Harlequin with its Swiss entity resulting in authors receiving 3% to 4% of the e-books’ cover price as their 50% share instead of 50% of Harlequin Enterprises’ receipts.”

Read more

Should eBooks Restrict Your Ability To Copy & Paste?

Should publishers restrict your ability to copy and paste highlighted sections in your favorite eBook?  After underlining 25 passages in a brilliant Kindle book this weekend, this GalleyCat editor received a “Clipping Limit Exceeded” message and could not view (nor share) online the highlights he made inside a $13 eBook.

Here’s the  message: “For some books the publisher allows only a limited percentage of a book to be ‘clipped’ and stored separately from the main body of the book, as normally happens when you add a highlight. If you exceed this limit then you will see fewer highlights on this website than you actually marked on your Kindle. Popular Highlights are not counted towards this clipping limit.”

Some MobileRead Kindle users are actively fighting the policy–what do you think? Earlier this year, we showed you five easy steps to copy, paste, and print your highlights and notes from inside Kindle eBooks.

Should eBooks Restrict Your Ability To Copy & Paste?

What’s Your Favorite eBook Orientation?

This GalleyCat editor reads almost all his digital books on the iPad in a double-sided landscape view (pictured, via).

What’s your favorite eBook orientation–landscape or portrait? It’s an important question for publishers, authors and editors to ask. Answer our quick poll below and help us understand how our readers like to read.

Gotham Chopra & Scribd Launch Community eBook

btn_logo_red_122x44.gifThe online writing site Scribd’s has teamed up with author Gotham Chopra to produce the site’s first “community eBook.”

After reading Chopra’s Walking Wisdom, readers can submit their own dog stories to a special eBook edition of the book. The new edition has already been read 4,500 times. Follow this link to contribute your story, and we’ve embedded a graphic with directions below.

Here’s more from Chopra about the project: “One of the best parts of writing my latest book Walking Wisdom was reflecting on some of my fondest memories with my dogs, my infant son, and my father. Early on, to trigger some of my own recollections, I started seeking stories and anecdotes from people online. Almost from the moment I tweeted the solicit, I was getting bombarded with responses. It was fantastic and exciting. People had stories, both triumphant and tragic, and pictures, goofy and cuddly that they wanted to share. But there was a problem. I hadn’t quite thought through my plan. When people asked where they could send their stories, pictures, poems, and press clippings (yes – there seemed to be a lot of local news stories about heroic dogs!), I didn’t have an answer. I had nowhere to direct them … [Now] there’s an actual plan in place and a platform to welcome you to.”

Read more