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Posts Tagged ‘Ed Park’

Jenny Milchman & Lori Rader-Day Get Booked

Mystery OneHere are some literary events to pencil in your calendar this week.

To get your event posted on our calendar, visit our Facebook Your Literary Event page. Please post your event at least one week prior to its date.

Writers Jenny Milchman and Lori Rader-Day will appear together at the Mystery One Bookstore. Meet them on Monday, July 28th starting 7 p.m. (Milwaukee, WI)

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Amazon To Publish Biography of Jesus

Amazon Publishing will release a short biography of Jesus written by Jay Parini, part of the publisher’s new Icons series of short biographies.

Penguin Lives editor James Atlas and senior editor Ed Park will edit the series, launching with ten titles on a bi-monthly schedule. The $3.99 Kindle edition and $12 hardcover of Jesus: The Human Face of God will be available in December. Here’s more from the release:

The first ten books in the series are Jesus by Jay PariniStalin by Paul JohnsonLucian Freud by Phoebe HobanJ.D. Salinger by Thomas Beller, Poe by Paul CollinsVan Gogh by Julian BellHemingway by Mark KurlanskyDavid Lynch by Dennis LimHannah Arendt by Anne Heller, and Hitchcock by Michael Wood.

(Mobile image by formatc1)

James Franco Scores Amazon Book Deal

Actor and author James Franco has landed a book deal to publish his first novel with Amazon.

According to the New York Observer, 3 Arts Entertainment agent Richard Abate negotiated the deal for Actors Anonymous with Amazon fiction editor (and departed Believer editor) Ed Park. As you ponder the news, you should listen to the Hoodie Allen song, “James Franco.” The video is embedded above, with a bit of NSFW language.

Here’s more about the deal: “The novel is  said to be a fictionalized version of Mr. Franco’s experiences as an actor (and grad student?). Mr. Franco’s first book, a collection of short stories called Palo Alto, was published by Scribner.”

Ed Park Leaving The Believer

A few months after he joined Amazon New York as a senior editor, Ed Park is leaving The Believer.

Park helped found the literary journal in 2002, and has served as an editor there ever since.

Here’s more from The Believer: “Ed singlehandedly revived the exclamation-point industry, an industry whose smelters had shuttered and whose lobbyists found themselves homeless in the ice age of irony. No longer. Ed is a person whose person is enthusiastically available in the personless realms, which is where we like to conduct our office business. He brought pep and good humor and was, despite his amiability and vim, deceptively hard to please. We commemorate his contribution to the magazine by continuing the Parkian editorial tradition of hard-a**ed enthusiasm.”

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Ed Park Joins Amazon As Senior Editor

Ed Park, founding editor of The Believer magazine, has joined Amazon New York as a Senior Editor. In his new role, Park will be responsible for acquiring and editing literary fiction.

Park, who got his M.F.A. at Columbia University’s School of the Arts where he now teaches, has worked as literary editor of The Village Voice and as an editor at the Poetry Foundation. He is also a judge of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize’s graphic novel category and chairs the reading committee of the New York Public Library’s Young Lions award.

Park is also the author of the 2008 novel Personal Days, which was a finalist for the PEN/Hemingway Foundation Award. He teaches writing at Columbia University’s School of the Arts, where he received his M.F.A.

Cormac McCarthy Opens Up to Oprah

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Yesterday Cormac McCarthy made his debut television appearance on the Oprah Winfrey Show and AP’s Hillel Italie has the details. The 73-year-old McCarthy has spoken with the press just twice before – both times for print publications – in the past 40 years, but he opened up for Winfrey. The author said he has nothing against the media; he just doesn’t like talking about what he does – a trait Winfrey illustrated with a story about how McCarthy, when he had no money years ago, refused a speaking engagement that would have paid him $2,000. “You work your side of the street, I’ll work mine,” he said in the interview, taped at the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico.

Ed Park liveblogged McCarthy’s appearance, taking down many memorable quotes such as this exchange:

O: Are you just not interested in material [things]?

C: They take a distant second place to living your life and doing what you want to do… I always knew I didn’t want to work….It was my number one priority.
O: So you have worked at…not working.
C: Absolutely.

When a Literary Event Hits A Bit Too Close

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Photo credit: Leslie Shipman, the National Book Foundation

If you were in the audience at the Morgan Library yesterday evening and noticed an almost unshakable, unstoppable gale of laughter, well, that was me. I knew that any event featuring National Book Award winner Richard Powers (above, with your humble GalleyCat correspondent) and literary critic John Leonard would be amazing stuff, and the informal conversation comprising the second half of the evening was chock full of observations about the state of criticism, blogging’s place in the literary world, cognitive dissonance, Kurt Vonnegut‘s death, the need for endings and narrative and when the questions went to the audience, why Powers’s piece on using voice recognition software to write his novels has garnered him the most responses of anything he’s written.

But it was the first half, featuring the New York premiere of a new piece by Powers (the world premiere, so to speak, happened late last month at Penn State) that caught my attention immediately and held the audience pretty much in thrall the rest of the way. “The Moving Finger” recounts the curious adventures of a Powers-like narrator as he stumbles across the seemingly anonymous blog Speculum Mundi, whose Latin-named proprietor rants in “Camille Paglia meets NOVA” style about neuroscience, the relevance of literature and other topics to make it “12 percent more accurate than the leading literary blogs.” Slowly, Powers takes his narrator through startling cognitive changes that have him converge and diverge with the blogger in startling ways.

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Dateline LBF: Further to the Dealmaking

  • Peter Ackroyd moves from Random House to Macmillan in a six-book deal. (the Bookseller)
  • UK rights to Eagles guitarist Don Felder‘s HEAVEN AND HELL: MY LIFE AS AN EAGLE went to Wiedenfeld & Nicholson. US rights are with Hyperion. (the Bookseller)
  • EVERY HOME NEEDS A BALCONY by Rina Frank, pitched as “the Israeli KITE RUNNER”, has sold in six countries. (the Bookseller)
  • UK & Commonwealth rights for Believer editor Ed Park‘s PERSONAL DAYS was pre-empted by Rosalind Porter at Vintage. (the Bookseller)
  • US rights to Sophie Dahl‘s novel PLAYING WITH THE GROWN-UPS went to, of all people, Nan Talese/Doubleday. (the Bookseller)
  • One deal that won’t be brokered at LBF, contrary to rumor, is for Keith Richards‘ memoirs. But agent Ed Victor did confirm that he would be selling the memoir this summer. “In terms of foreign rights it will be the hot book at Frankfurt,” he predicted. (the Bookseller)