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Posts Tagged ‘Edwidge Danticat’

Bronwen Hruska Named Publisher of Soho Press

sohop23.jpgToday Soho Press named Bronwen Hruska publisher of the press. Her mother, publisher and co-founder Laura Hruska, will remain editor-and-chief of the press.

Bronwen Hruska has worked as an associate publisher at the press since 2008. She graduated from Yale and the Columbia School of Journalism. She has written for the New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, the Los Angeles Times, and the Village Voice. Laura Hruska has been at Soho Press for 24 years, publishing a slate of authors that included: Edwidge Danticat, Sara Gran, Qiu Xiaolong, and Cara Black.

The new publisher had this statement: “I’ve always been on the writing and editing end of things, so my learning curve over the past 18 months has been huge … Obviously it’s a challenging moment to break into publishing, but it’s also a moment filled with exciting prospects and possibilities. I remain in awe of my mother for what she’s built, and I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to take Soho into the next decade and beyond.”

GalleyCatnip: Edwidge Danticat Will Miss the Oprah Winfrey Show

20091120-tows-why-oprah-end-talk-show-290x218.jpgFor your weekend reading pleasure, here some publishing news briefs…

Oprah Winfrey announced today that she will end her popular show in 2011, closing the televised side of the most influential book club in America. Author Edwidge Danticat told the Wall Street Journal why she will miss the club: “When she calls to tell you that your book has been selected for the book club, she sounds so excited that you feel as though she’s both your ideal reader and your biggest cheerleader.”

To write its embargo-breaking scoop about Sarah Palin‘s memoir (which has reportedly sold 300,000 copies already), the AP ripped, scanned, and mined the text for juicy tidbits.

Kat Meyer interviewed Angela James, the executive editor for Carina Press on Twitter for her weekly Follow Reader Twitter chat. Read the whole exchange at #followreader.

Why author and literary blogger Maud Newton is writing a novel instead of a memoir.

MacArthur Foundation to Announce $500,000 “Genius Grant” Winners

DANTICAT-PROFILE.JPGToday the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation celebrates 24 creative individuals who will receive one of the Foundation’s annual $500,000 awards–the famous “genius grants.”

Three writers were included among the winners: author Edwidge Danticat (pictured), short-story writer Deborah Eisenberg, and poet Heather McHugh.

Here’s more from Danticat, from a NY Times article: “It felt incredibly, wonderfully surreal … What artists crave and need most is time. It will definitely buy some time. It’s wonderful to have a sense of security, especially in these economic times.” (Via Publishers Weekly)

Edwidge Danticat and Salman Rushdie Headline PEN World Voices Festival

DanticatEdwidge.jpgEarlier this spring, Salman Rushdie bemoaned America’s “paucity” of translated works, but the PEN World Voices Festival’s headline reading featured writers from Hungary, India, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Canada. Most of the headliners focused on raw and violent significance of the theme: “Evolution/Revolution.

Péter Nádas read about a political execution, Sergio Ramírez pondered murder in Nicaragua, and Rushdie studied a fictional Islamic guerrilla training camp. Raja Shehadeh held the Cooper Union crowd in rapt attention with a tense meeting between a Palestinian and a pot-smoking Israeli soldier in the West Bank. “This beautiful day and your gun don’t go together,” the main character tells the soldier, initiating a suspenseful conversation beside an idyllic river.

Author Edwidge Danticat (pictured) studied a different kind of culture clash. She read the Haitian poem “Tourist” by Felix Morisseau-Leroy, which opened with these powerful words: “Don’t take my picture, tourist / I’m too ugly / Too dirty / Too skinny / Don’t take my picture, white man.”

(For more PEN Fest coverage, check out these book trailer tips.)

Mary Gordon Wins Story Prize 2006

Where there are literary awards, there is the Tishman Auditorium at the New School. And while the place wasn’t filled to full capacity, an enthusiastic crowd showed up for yesterday’s awards night, giving equal weight to bestowing its goblet prize and $20,000 cheque to winner Mary Gordon (for THE STORIES OF MARY GORDON) as to celebrating the short story. “It’s such an honor to accept an award for the short story, which is becoming somewhat of an endangered species,” Gordon said to open her acceptance speech, mentioning how many fine writers known for their story skills – like John Cheever, Katherine Ann Porter and Flannery O’Connor – all turned to novels because they were deemed to be the “real thing.”

But the readings by each of the three finalists and subsequent Q&As with Story Prize co-founder Larry Dark demonstrated the story’s ability to be real to the point of naturalistic (in the case of Rick Bass, reading “Her First Elk” from his collection THE LIVES OF ROCKS) or comically absurd (demonstrated with continued hilarity by Gordon’s “My Podiatrist Tells Me A Story About a Boy and a Dog” and George Saunders‘ speculative tale of a verbally idiosyncratic teen named “Jon”.) The biggest laugh came when Saunders admitted, upon Dark’s probing, that he does indeed laugh at his own writing, “but I never like to admit it because it’s absurd. Here’s this balding, middle-aged man reading something he likes and ‘oh isn’t this funny!’. It’s ridiculous.” What wasn’t ridiculous was how close the vote was; we understand judges Edwidge Danticat, Mitchell Kaplan and Ron Hogan had their work cut out for them, trying to decide between three excellent yet radically different collections—at least they only had three to deal with, after they’d been culled from a shortlist of 65 story collections that, in Dark’s words, were extremely difficult to pare down. “I actually had to stop reading short stories about two months before Larry gave us the finalists,” Ron said about his approach to the judging process, “because there was so many great collections coming out that I couldn’t think of any other way I’d be able to look at the actual nominees with a fresh set of eyes, not comparing them to everybody else. Since I’ve already read these three books, the first thing I’m going to do this weekend is finally crack open All Aunt Hagar’s Children by Edward P. Jones, and then I’ve got at least six others lined up after that…”

The Story Prize Names its Finalists

Fiction collections by authors Mary Gordon, Rick Bass and George Saunders have been named finalists for the third annual Story Prize, given to the year’s outstanding book of short fiction. Bass was nominated for THE LIVES OF ROCKS (Houghton Mifflin), Gordon for THE STORIES OF MARY GORDON (Pantheon) and Saunders for IN PERSUASION NATION (Riverhead.) The winner, to be announced at an awards ceremony at the New School’s Tishman Auditorium on February 28, receives $20,000. Finalists will each be given $5,000.

GalleyCat‘s own Ron Hogan was one of the three judges (along with author Edwidge Danticat and Books & Books owner Mitchell Kaplan) and has dipped into each of these collections, along with many other potential candidates, as they’ve been published over the last several months. “I’m looking forward to devoting a lot more time to these three authors in the following weeks,” Hogan said, “and I’m glad I’ve got two other well-informed judges to help make what will undoubtedly be a tough decision.”

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