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Posts Tagged ‘Emily Dickinson’

Collaborate with William Shakespeare & Emily Dickinson Online

 

In a special Google Docs demonstration online, you can collaborate on a story with Charles Dickens, Friedrich Nietzsche, William Shakespeare, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Emily Dickinson and Edgar Allan Poe.

As you type your text into the demo box, these writers will add little flourishes and quotes to your story.

We created a short story with the help of Dickens and Nietzsche, click on the image embedded above to see the collaboration in action. Who will you write with? (Link via)

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Settlement Approved Between DOJ & Three Publishers

U.S. District Court judge Denise Cote has approved the eBook settlement struck between Hachette Book Group, Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins and the Department of Justice.

The New York Times has the scoop: “The settlement approved on Thursday called for the publishers to end their contracts with Apple within one week. The publishers must also terminate contracts with e-book retailers that contain restrictions on the retailer’s ability to set the price of an e-book or contain a so-called ‘most favored nation’ clause, which says that no other retailer is allowed to sell e-books for a lower price.”

The judge quoted an immortal poem in her decision (embedded below): “there can be no denying the importance of books and authors in the quest for human knowledge and creative expression, and in supporting a free and prosperous society. To quote Emily Dickinson: ‘There is no Frigate like a Book / To take us Lands away, / Nor any Coursers like a Page / Of prancing Poetry /–This Traverse may the poorest take /Without oppress of Toll /–How frugal is the Chariot /  That bears a Human soul.’ Clearly, this is no ordinary Tunney Act proceeding.”

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Possible Emily Dickinson Daguerreotype at Amherst College

Amherst College Archives and Special Collections has a copy of a 19th Century daguerreotype that could be the second photograph in existence of Emily Dickinson as an adult.

We’ve embedded a photo of the daguerreotype above (with Dickinson possibly on the left)–scholars are still trying to authenticate it, but evidence is mounting that it is an image of the great poet. Anyone can see the image upon request at the college, as scholars “hope that anyone with information about the photograph will come forward.” Here’s more from the archives:

The evidence for identifying this image as Dickinson is very good so far; in fact, all of the current evidence is in its favor, including computer work with detailed scans of the original daguerreotypes (1847 and 1859) and an ophthalmological report (Susan Pepin Report–pdf) facilitated by Polly Longsworth in March, 2010. Certainly the addition of a second sitter of whom there are multiple images in existence helps the case: if one can show that it’s Kate Turner, a known friend of Dickinson, then it increases the chance that the other sitter who looks like Dickinson is Dickinson. One sure point of contention is the clothing: people will note that the dress “Dickinson” wears seems to be out of date for a late 1850s photograph. However, that evidence may be of less significance when one considers the 23-year-old Dickinson’s comment to friend Abiah Root in 1854, “I’m so old fashioned, Darling, that all your friends would stare” (Johnson letter 166).

Lewis Carroll Reads ‘Jabberwocky’

In honor of National Poetry Month, we dug up an animated video of children’s author Lewis Carroll reading his poem, “Jabberwocky.”

The poem originated in Carroll’s novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, the sequel to Alice in Wonderland.

The poetryreincarnations channel on YouTube features videos where great poets are “reincarnated” through animation to read some of the most celebrated poetry of all time. Check it out and you’ll find clips with Sylvia Plath, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.

Bill Murray Reads Poetry to Manhattan Construction Workers

Last week Bill Murray visited the construction site for Poet’s House in Manhattan, reading some snappy poems for the bemused workers.

In the video embedded above, watch the actor read “Poet’s Work” by Lorine Niedecker and “I dwell in possibility” by Emily Dickinson–cracking jokes the whole time.

Here’s more from the site: “Members of the construction team which built Poets House’s new home join actor Bill Murray for the first poetry reading at 10 River Terrace.” (Via Edward Champion & Unbeige)

The Everyman’s Library Turns 100

everyman.gifThe Wall Street Journal’s Tom Nolan focuses attention on the centenary of the Everyman’s Library, founded in 1906 by bookbinder-turned-publisher Joseph Malaby Dent to preserve great works of literature. The books found a fan in Knopf editor-in-chief Sonny Mehta, who read them while growing up in post-colonial India. “They were cheap, they were accessible, one found them in bookstores,” said Mehta. “If you were given books as gifts, they tended to be Everyman’s…..A lot of my early reading with classics — though one didn’t even know they were classics, I mean whether it was Dumas or Jules Verne or anything else — that’s what they tended to be.”

Which is why, as competitors like the Library of America and Modern Library encroached the market and paperbacks made classics even cheaper, Everyman’s fell into the hands of UK publisher Tom Campbell in 1990 – who needed an American partner, which turned out to be Mehta. A revived line, with an initial 46 titles (Austen to Zola), was debuted by Random House UK and Knopf in the U.S. in 1991. Since then, the Everyman’s Library — with old and new incarnations celebrating a combined 100th anniversary in the year just completed — has done 500 titles and sold 12 million books.

One avowed fan is Joan Didion, whose seven volumes of non-fiction were recently collected in the Everyman’s edition WE TELL OURSELVES STORIES IN ORDER TO LIVE. “I don’t know if you remember what it was like,” the California-born writer asked recently by telephone from New York, “to first have a book in your hand, whenever it was that you first bought a book? A whole lot of [its appeal] had to do with the way it looked and felt. I remember very distinctly: Somebody gave me a merchandise award at a bookstore in Sacramento, and I bought a Modern Library of Emily Dickinson and the collected poems of T.S. Eliot. And the Eliot had a smooth yellow cover; and the Emily Dickinson had sort of a classic Modern Library cover…pink and gray and black. I mean, it was the physical appearance of these books that meant a whole lot to me, then.”