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Posts Tagged ‘Ernest Hemingway’

Ernest Hemingway Photo Wins Paris Review Photoshop Contest

Jack Around has won the beach towel Photoshop contest at The Paris Review. The image embedded on the side showcases “Ernest Hemingway,” the winning photograph.

The winner edited six photos for the contest. The pictures feature highly prolific writers such as George Orwell, Sir Salman Rushdie and Vladimir Nabokov.

Here’s more from the announcement: “The entries were truly staggering in their creativity and execution … Like I said, this wasn’t easy—but we were not going to argue with a man pointing a gun at us.”

Hint Fiction Contest Seeks One Minute Films

The new Hint Fiction Film contest will give aspiring filmmakers a chance to work with stories written by Ernest Hemingway, Edith Piaf or Eric Hsu.

On August 15, contestants will be assigned a short story from the book, Hint Fiction: An Anthology of Stories in 25 Words or Fewer. They must create a one-minute film based on the assigned story.

Follow this link for more details. The winner will receive “a cash and/or prize package TBD with a minimum value of $500.” If you want to participate, submit an entry form along with a $25 fee.

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Zach Galifianakis Dressed Up Like Ernest Hemingway’s Doppelgänger

An  LA Times portrait of comedic actor Zach Galifianakis bears a striking resemblance to a famous Yousuf Karsh photograph of Ernest Hemingway.

Follow this link to see the photo. When asked about the resemblance, Galifianakis replied: “To Mariel Hemingway, maybe. Not the other one.” In the tweet posted above, writer Edward Champion already predicts Galifianakis could play Hemingway in a movie.

He has plenty of competition. Last summer, Charles Bicht was crowned as the “29th Papa” in the Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. This annual event pits bearded men in a competition celebrating the Nobel Prize winner.

Seven Authors Who Wrote While Nude

Writers have always had interesting stories beyond the ones they put down to paper. Here’s the naked truth: Neatorama has outed seven well-known authors as nudist writers.

The authors are Victor Hugo, Ernest Hemingway, D.H. Lawrence, James Whitcomb Riley, Edmond Rostand, Benjamin Franklin, and Agatha Christie.

Hemingway’s cousin, Edward actually opened Britain’s oldest nudist colony during the 1930s and called it Metherell Towers. So far, there are no accountings of Ernest having visited the colony. Most of the authors don’t give an explanation for the unclothed state, but French novelist Hugo had a legitimate methodical purpose behind his nudeness.

Neatorama reports: “When Victor Hugo, the famous author of great tomes such as Les Misérables and The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, ran into a writer’s block, he concocted a unique scheme to force himself to write: he had his servant take all of his clothes away for the day and leave his own nude self with only pen and paper, so he’d have nothing to do but sit down and write.”

Books in a Cigarette Pack

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Joseph Conrad, Ernest Hemingway, Franz Kafka, and other smoking hot authors are coming to a cigarette pack near you. But these literary lights won’t need a Surgeon General’s warning.

As the rest of the world debates price points for digital books, Tank Books is wrapping print editions of classic stories in some innovative packaging–a cigarette pack that fits easily inside your pocket or purse. The site made this GalleyCat editor remember his younger days as a literary smoker, and we heartily endorse this healthier alternative.

Here’s more from the site: “The flip-top cigarette pack is one of the most successful pieces of packaging design in history. TankBooks pay homage to this iconic form by employing it in the service of great literature. We have launched a series of books designed to mimic cigarette packs–the same size, packaged in flip-top cartons with silver foil wrapping and sealed in cellophane. The titles are by authors of great stature–classic stories presented in classic packaging; objects desirable for both their literary merit and their unique design. The complete set comes in a stunning tin–perfect as a really original gift.” (Via AgencySpy)

Writing Contest: One Object, Six Words

balllighter2.jpgHow many words do you need to tell a story about an inanimate object? Smith magazine has teamed up with Significant Objects for an interesting contest–asking writers to compose a six-word story about that photograph.

Here are the details:”Can you create Significance for this Object in just six words? The winning response will be published on the Significant Objects site, and more to the point, on its eBay store. Proceeds from that auction go to the author of the winning submission.”

Ernest Hemingway created the first six-word story about an inanimate object as well, famously writing a tragedy with two simple sentences: “For Sale: baby shoes, never worn.” The Smith magazine contest ends on Friday, November 6, at 8 pm EST–submit your entry today…

Ernest Hemingway’s “Suicidal” U-Boat War

9781416597865.jpgDuring World War II, novelist Ernest Hemingway took a very hands-on approach while performing his patriotic duties–risking his life and literary legacy on the open waters around Cuba.

According to a story in The Daily Beast, Hemingway took his Cuba U-boat patrols very seriously: “If he spotted a U-boat, not only would he call for backup, he wanted to attack the sub himself. So he took some hand grenades and Thompson machine guns with him on his boat. Of course, trying to attack one of the subs was suicidal. If he had tried–if he’d gotten alongside the sub–U-boat captains would have sunk him.”

The article was written by Terry Mort, author of the new book, “The Hemingway Patrols: Ernest Hemingway and His Hunt for U-Boats.” It was part of The Daily Beast‘s new feature, “Just the Fact,” interviewing authors about an unexpected fact in their historical books–a useful introduction to any new title.

Ernest Hemingway, KGB Agent?

9780300123906.jpgIn one of the more shocking bits of recently uncovered literary history, a new book alleges that American Nobel laureate Ernest Hemingway worked as a KGB agent in the 1940s.

According to the Guardian, the new book “Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America” includes the author on a list of KGB agents in the United States. The book rests on KGB files researched by former KGB officer Alexander Vassiliev, one of three co-authors of the Yale University Press title.

Here’s more from the article, summarizing Hemingway’s part in the book: “[He was] given the cover name ‘Argo,’ and ‘repeatedly expressed his desire and willingness to help us’ when he met Soviet agents in Havana and London in the 40s. However, he failed to ‘give us any political information” and was never ‘verified in practical work.’” (Via Fiction Circus)

Ernest Hemingway’s Imported Cocktail

2009Cocktailsbook.gifDespite this cold and rainy summer on the East Coast, the Daily Beast reported on the tropical, summery drink that Ernest Hemingway imported from Cuba.

The essay has a brief history of daiquiri, then delivers three different recipes for the classic umbrella-laden drink. If you are looking for more recipes, this GalleyCat editor has also been performing some journalistic mixology with a copy of Food & Wine’s Cocktails ’09 book.

Here’s more from the story: “Hemingway, it seems universally agreed, would have likely done a shot of Scope if that’s all that was available. But when visiting a dark bar off Havana’s Parque Central called El Floridita, he stumbled upon a drink called the daiquiri and forever changed the way that summer tastes.”

Big Deal for Historical Novel on Hemingway’s Wife

newbio4.gifNovelist Paula McLain just sold a novel about the life of Ernest Hemingway‘s first wife, reportedly landing a half-million dollar deal.

According to the NY Observer, Random House executive editor Susanna Porter bought the historical novel about the relationship between Hadley Richardson and Hemingway (pictured via, circa World War I). Agent Julie Barer sealed the deal.

The article explains how the book follows “the five-year period after World War I during which Richardson and Hemingway, who was in his 20s, were married and living as expats in Paris alongside Lost Generation writers like Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein and Sherwood Anderson.”

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