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Posts Tagged ‘F Scott Fitzgerald’

Great Gatsby Boat Tour on Long Island

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past,” wrote F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Great Gatsby. Now you can live that famous metaphor in a two-hour Great Gatsby Boat Tour of Manhasset Bay and Long Island Sound.

Adult tickets cost $25 and tickets for children 10-years-old or younger cost $15. The next tour leaves on Saturday, May 21st at 2 pm. Follow this link for tickets.

The Great Gatsby was set on “that slender riotous island” otherwise known as Long Island. Join us on a boat tour of the bay that ignited Fitzgerald’s imagination and become familiar with the peninsulas of West Egg (King’s Point) and East Egg (Sand’s Point) … Try to envision where Gatsby’s mansion might have stood and exchange stories of “the roaring twenties” on Long Island – a microcosm of the U.S.’s pre-WWII revolution in manners and morals.

The Great Gatsby Nintendo Game

Some brilliant artists have re-imagined F. Scott Fitzgerald‘s The Great Gatsby as a Nintendo game from the late 1980s. Above, we’ve embedded a screen-shot from the crazy project.

Follow this link to play the game (complete with 8-bit graphics and tinny soundtrack). According to the website, this wonderful bit of fan fiction was discovered at a yard sale. We are a bit skeptical about this creation myth, but it is a lovely piece of fan fiction.

Here’s more from the site: “If anybody has more info about this please let me know ! As it is, I really don’t know much about this game. I found it at a yard sale. I bought it for 50 cents and went home to try it out. After dusting off my NES for like, 20 minutes I got it working, and jesus. So weird. Apparently it’s an unreleased localization of a Japanese cart called “Doki Doki Toshokan: Gatsby no Monogatari”, but I haven’t found anything about that either. What’s left of the manual was just rubberbanded to the cartridge. I finally scanned them.” (Via io9)

Romeo & Juliet in 60 Seconds

When eBookNewser gathered a list of romance films based on books, Romeo & Juliet made the cut.

In the the video embedded above, one reader retells the story of the world’s most famous star-crossed lovers in just 60-seconds.

This project is part of LitDrift’s “Classic Novels in 60 Seconds or Less” video series. What other great love stories could be told in 60 seconds?

Read more

Leonardo DiCaprio & Carey Mulligan to Star in ‘The Great Gatsby’ Adaptation

Actor Leonardo DiCaprio will play Jay Gatsby and Carey Mulligan will play Daisy Buchanan in an upcoming adaptation of The Great Gatsby. Baz Luhrmann, the director of Moulin Rouge! and Romeo + Juliet, is preparing to direct the adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s beloved novel.

Mulligan received the news yesterday. The 25-year-old actress was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in the adaptation, An Education. Luhrmann included that photo of the actress on his website (copyright Bazmark), an image shot while Mulligan auditioned for the role earlier this month.

Here’s more from the director’s website: “Regarding the role of Daisy Buchanan, I was privileged to explore the character with some of the world’s most talented actresses, each one bringing their own particular interpretation. However, specific to this particular production of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, I was thrilled to pick up the phone an hour ago to the young Oscar-nominated British actress Carey Mulligan and say to her: ‘Hello, Daisy Buchanan.’”

David Fincher to Adapt Spooky 1970s Novel

dvdimage_seven.jpgDirector David Fincher will remake a 1970s movie based on a long out-of-print novel, Reincarnation of Peter Proud.

Fincher’s last film adapted an F. Scott Fitzgerald short story into an epic Oscar-nominated film, “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” According to Paste magazine, the new adaptation will focus on headier material. The original was directed by J. Lee Thompson (director of Cape Fear) and caused a stir with incest themes. The new film will be written by Andrew Kevin Walker and produced by the same crew behind Fincher’s darkest film, Seven.

Here’s more from the article: “The original version of The Reincarnation of Peter Proud centered on a man who has flashbacks and visions. When he investigates them further, they lead him to a mysterious woman and her daughter, and he begins a love affair with the latter … Fincher intends to contemporize Proud, adhering as closely to the source material of Max Ehrlich’s novel as possible.

Joyce Carol Oates’ Literary Look at Ted Kennedy

9780446539258_94X145.jpgAs public figures remember Senator Edward M. Kennedy, his love of poetry and literature has surfaced in tributes.

In a probing essay for the Guardian, prolific author Joyce Carol Oates used classic literary works by F. Scott Fitzgerald and Joseph Conrad to measure Kennedy’s reputation. It is an tough portrait of the Senator and an exploration of public redemption in America.

Here’s an excerpt from the essay: “One is led to think of Tom and Daisy Buchanan of Fitzgerald’s the ‘Great Gatsby,’ rich individuals accustomed to behaving carelessly and allowing others to clean up after them … The poet John Berryman once wondered: ‘Is wickedness soluble in art?.’ One might rephrase, in a vocabulary more suitable for our politicized era: ‘Is wickedness soluble in good deeds?’” (Via The Awl)

Screenwriter Budd Schulberg Has Died

runsammy.gifNovelist and screenwriter Budd Schulberg has died. He was the author of “What Makes Sammy Run?” and the acclaimed screenplays for “On the Waterfront” and “A Face in the Crowd.”

The New York Times obituary recounts Schulberg’s early days as a screenwriter and his struggles after being blacklisted as a Communist. Following a strange experience working on a script with the great novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald, Schulberg wrote the novel “The Disenchanted.”

The article has a wonderful quote about those heady days: “‘I said, ‘Who’s the writer?’ He said, ‘F. Scott Fitzgerald.’ … ‘I thought it was just a joke, like saying ‘Leo Tolstoy,” Mr. Schulberg recalled. ‘And I said, ‘Scott Fitzgerald — isn’t he dead?’ And he said, ‘No, he’s not dead, he’s right in the next room reading your script.’”

Stanza Reader Turns One-Year-Old

droppedImage_6.gifStanza, the digital reader for the iPhone and iPod Touch, turned one-year-old today–celebrating 2 million downloads of the application and more than 12 million book downloads since its launch.

In April, Amazon.com, Inc. acquired Lexcycle, the company that created the Stanza reader. Coincidentally, this GalleyCat editor spent the weekend exploring the Munseys.com category of the Stanza catalog and reading free pulp fiction classics.

Stanza co-founder Neelan Choksi had this statement: “These milestones highlight that many people are quite comfortable reading full length books via Stanza on their iPhones and iPod touch. From commercial titles by Stephenie Meyer and Dan Brown to public domain titles by F. Scott Fitzgerald and H.G. Wells, we are thrilled to learn that Stanza has been partially responsible for a lot of people reading more in the past year than they have in years prior to that.” (Via Kat Meyer)

Big Deal for Historical Novel on Hemingway’s Wife

newbio4.gifNovelist Paula McLain just sold a novel about the life of Ernest Hemingway‘s first wife, reportedly landing a half-million dollar deal.

According to the NY Observer, Random House executive editor Susanna Porter bought the historical novel about the relationship between Hadley Richardson and Hemingway (pictured via, circa World War I). Agent Julie Barer sealed the deal.

The article explains how the book follows “the five-year period after World War I during which Richardson and Hemingway, who was in his 20s, were married and living as expats in Paris alongside Lost Generation writers like Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein and Sherwood Anderson.”

American Readers: Rising Up or Fading Out?

1242299192488.jpgOn Friday afternoon, American readers were praised, teased, and celebrated during a lively BEA panel discussion moderated by Granta‘s newly-appointed acting editor, John Freeman. The editor grilled novelists Olga Grushin, Sherman Alexie, and Paul Auster about the literary journal’s new fiction issue and American letters.

Alexie made a controversial point about readership: “All of us are writing for college-educated middle-aged white women,” he said. “Look around you. Count!” The audience ruefully complied, testing his generalization.

Grushin recalled how she moved to the United States as a 17-year-old student and read American writers for a year straight, hoping to strike up literary conversations. “I thought I could come here and talk to people about what I read–boy was I wrong!” she said, and the audience giggled nervously. She recounted telling an American teenager that her favorite authors were Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. “I’ve never read those Russian writers,” replied her young friend.

Auster concluded the discussion with an unwavering faith in his country’s pool of writers. “This is what makes American literature so vital–it’s so full of talent that these things bubble up anyway; despite the recession, despite declining literacy rates, there are as many poets now as there ever was.”

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