InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Fredrik Colting’

Fake J.D. Salinger Oral History Coming in August

Late Show with David Letterman writer and George W. Bush: An Unauthorized Oral History author Tom Ruprecht will publish This Would Drive Him Crazy: A Phony Oral History of J.D. Salinger as a humorous Kindle Single in August.

The parody book will explore imaginary excerpts from the author’s unpublished work, taking a decidedly silly look at Salinger’s life. Here’s more from the release:

This Would Drive Him Crazy reveals shocking secrets about the notoriously reclusive Salinger, from his painful breakup with Taylor Swift to his failed attempt at turning Franny and Zooey into a “Laverne & Shirley”-type sitcom. Ruprecht pulled off a daring Oceans 11-style heist to bust open the safe in Salinger’s house and as a result you’ll be treated to excerpts from J.D.’s diaries, letters and unpublished novels (including the 1985 sequel to The Catcher in the Rye that finds Holden working as a lobbyist for Big Oil).This Would Drive Him Crazy chronicles Salinger’s fascinating encounters with some of the most recognizable figures of our time, including The Beatles, George W. Bush, Pamela Anderson, Michael Jackson and Michael Jackson’s baboon.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Starting September 8, get hands-on content marketing training in Content Marketing 101! Through a series of webcasts, content and marketing experts will teach you the best practices for creating, distributing and measuring the results of your brand's content, including how to develop a content marketing plan, become a content marketer, and more. Register now! 

J.D. Salinger Estate Settles Suit with Fredrik Colting

salingerbook.jpgThe J.D. Salinger estate has settled the lawsuit against Swedish publisher and author Fredrik Colting. The estate had sued the author over his Catcher in the Rye sequel60 Years Later–Coming Through the Rye.

Publisher’s Weekly has more details: “Colting has agreed not to publish or otherwise distribute the book, e-book, or any other editions of 60 Years Later in the U.S. or Canada until The Catcher in the Rye enters the public domain. Notably, however, Colting is free  to sell the book in other international territories without fear of interference.”

The article reports that Colting cannot include “Coming Through the Rye” as part of the book title. In addition, the author cannot refer to Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye, or his legal battles in the book.

Read more

Court of Appeals Pans J.D. Salinger Follow-Up

salingerbook.jpgYesterday author Fredrik Colting took his defense of his J.D. Salinger-inspired book to the U.S. Court of Appeals, hoping the court will reverse an order enjoining publication of “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye.”

According to Litigation Daily, Frankfurt, Kurnit, Klein & Selz partner Edward Rosenthal defended Colting and SCB Distributors Inc. in front of a three-judge panel, calling the book “highly transformative with enormous amounts of commentary and criticism.” After a hearing last month, federal judge Deborah Batts ruled that the Swedish author could not publish this book that re-examines the story of “The Catcher in the Rye.”

Here’s more from the article: “Rip-off or not, the book did not fare well under the critical eye of Judge Guido Calabresi at Thursday’s hearing. He called it “a rather dismal piece of work” … Judge Calabresi said the case raised First Amendment issues and that the district court may need more evidence to decide.”

Author Appeals J.D. Salinger’s Legal Victory

salingerbook.jpgIn a 58-page brief, author Fredrik Colting and his legal team disputed that his follow-up to J.D. Salinger‘s most famous novel was not a sequel, but “a critical examination.”

In the new filing, the legal team asks the U.S. Court of Appeals to reverse the court’s order enjoining publication of “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye.” After a hearing last month, federal Judge Deborah Batts ruled that a Swedish author could not publish this book that re-examines the story of “The Catcher in the Rye.”

Here’s more from the newly-filed appellants’ brief: “Had this commentary and criticism been published as an essay, a dissertation or an academic article, there is no doubt that it never would have been enjoined. And banning it, merely because it is presented in what might be a less academic form, not only deprives the Defendants of their rights, but also denies the public the opportunity to read this work and to appreciate the new light it sheds on one of the most famous works of American fiction.”

Judge Grants Temporary Restraining Order Against Salinger Tribute

salingerbook.jpgA federal judge issued a restraining order yesterday, temporarily blocking the publication of author Fredrik Colting‘s book “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye”–a novel revisiting characters from a classic J.D. Salinger novel.

According to Publishers Weekly, judge Deborah Batts granted a temporary order against the book that some have described as a sequel to “The Catcher in the Rye,” and must decide in the next ten days if she will permanently enjoin publication. In addition, the judge will rule if Colting’s book was fair use of Salinger’s work.

The article explained: “Batts’s ruling is the first time that the Second Circuit has explicitly ruled that a single character from a single work is copyrightable … [Batts] ruled that Caulfield, though appearing in only one book, was sufficiently delineated.”

Sara Nelson Defends Salinger Follow-Up

salingerbook.jpgFormer Publishers Weekly editor Sara Nelson has joined the legal fight against J.D. Salinger‘s efforts to block the publication of “60 Years Later–Coming Through the Rye.” UPDATE: On her Twitter feed, Nelson adds this comment: “For the record, I did not ‘join’ the anti-Salinger camp — just don’t think this book will hurt ['The Catcher in the Rye'].”

Yesterday the publishing reporter filed a declaration as an expert literary witness in the defense of author John David California (a pseudonym for author Fredrik Colting), Windupbird Publishing and SCB Distributors–the parties sued by Salinger to block 60 Years, a “critical analysis” that revisits the author’s classic novel, “The Catcher in the Rye.” The law firm of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz argue that Salinger’s legal team cannot prove “commercial harm” will result from the book, filing expert testimony from Nelson and two literature professors.

Here’s an excerpt from Nelson’s expert testimony: “Through my experience covering the publishing industry as a reporter and an editor, I understand the myriad variables that contribute to–or detract from–a book’s commercial success … 60 Years will have no detrimental impact on sales of Catcher … Anticipated sales of 60 Years, a critical analysis by a little-known author, pale in comparison to Catcher’s success … It is more likely that 60 Years, through its critical content and the attendant publicity it will likely generate, will actually contribute to renewed interest in, discussion of, and consequently sales of, Catcher.”

Salinger Follow-Up Author Unmasked

salingerbook.jpgThe 32-year-old Swedish publisher Fredrik Colting has admitted to writing a book that revisits the classic protagonist of “The Catcher in the Rye” as an elderly man. Writing with the pseudonym John David California, Colting, his publisher, and his distributor were all recently sued by J.D. Salinger.

The Smoking Gun reports–as GalleyCat discovered earlier–that Colting’s Nicotext imprint publishes a variety of odd joke titles like “The Macho Man’s (Bad) Joke Book.” Salinger seeks to block the publication of “60 Years Later: Coming Through the Rye” and seeks undisclosed damages. The distributor vowed to fight back in court next Monday.

Here’s more from the TSR report: “Colting told TSG that, along with a partner, he has produced a variety of humor or ‘quirk’ titles, but that ’60 Years Later’ was his “first published novel” … A purported photo of “California” appeared last month in England’s Daily Telegraph, but the picture was actually of actor Gustav Roth, a friend of Colting. ‘It was a bit tricky of us but we did it without any bad intentions,’ Colting wrote in an e-mail. ‘I mean, the whole point of a pseudonym is it being a secret.’”