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Posts Tagged ‘Goodreads’

What Writers Need to Know About Goodreads

The New York Times has profiled Goodreads, undoubtedly sending hundreds of writers and publishers flocking to the site. This bustling community of readers seems perfect for writers, but it is very easy to make a bad impression on its members.

After a long Ask Me Anything interview on Reddit, novelist Michael J. Sullivan collected some advice for writers using Goodreads. His advice can spare many writers some bad experiences on the network.

Here is his most important piece of advice: “The most important thing to remember about goodreads is that members of this site REALLY hate self-promotion. Primarily because too many authors come to the site and do drive-by posts and leave. This makes their radar on such matters very sensitive. The key to goodreads is to become a member of the community first…and mention your writing only in context and when appropriate.”

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Goodreads Tips for Writers & Old Fashioned eReaders: Top Stories of the Week

For your weekend reading pleasure, here are our top stories of the week.

They include Goodreads tips, a funny comic about eReaders and adding your audiobook to Spotify.

Click here to sign up for GalleyCat’s daily email newsletter, getting all our publishing stories, book deal news, videos, podcasts, interviews, and writing advice in one place.

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New Adult Fiction Readership Explodes on Goodreads

New Adult fiction has climbed our Self-Published Bestsellers List for months, and Goodreads has noted an explosion of new readers as well. The social network for readers has released a chart mapping how many New Adult books are being rated on the site.

As you can see by the graphic embedded above (click to enlarge), the chart has a steep growth rate. If you want to read more about the genre, check out our What Is New Adult Fiction? post for free samples and definitions.

Here’s more from Goodreads: “Publishers and readers are already embracing it, and here at Goodreads we’ve recognized the rapidly growing interest with our own genre page … We see the positive signs of readers taking to the new genre on Goodreads. Beginning in 2011, there was a spike in the number of readers identifying books as New Adult through custom shelves and rating books in the category. Two examples of recent New Adult success are Slammed by Colleen Hoover and Easy by Tammara Webber. Also, The Perfect Game by J. Sterling is a New Adult book that is trending well.”

Goodreads Reaches 10 Million Members

Goodreads, a social networking site for readers, has grown its membership to 10 million members. Collectively, these users have shelved 360 million books (chart embedded above).

The rate of growth has gained momentum in the last year and a half. The site earned its first 5 million members in four and a half years, and doubled its membership from 5 million members to 10 million members in the last 18 months.

Goodreads founder Otis Chandler blogged the news: “When we first launched in January of 2007 we waited until we hit what then seemed like a magical number of 100,000 members before we hired our first employee and secured angel funding. Since then, the vibrant Goodreads community and company has continued to blossom. We now have a team of 30, we’ve just moved into bigger, fancier offices in San Francisco, and we’ve launched an array of new products, including our super-awesome and successful Recommendations Engine.”

Goodreads has great resources for tracking popular titles and discovering reader preferences. For example, Goodreads discovered that dystopian fiction is more popular now than it has been in 50 years and made this infographic about the findings. The site recently launched a tool to make it easy to add Goodreads updates to your Facebook timeline. Follow this link to find out how.

Goodreads Partners with First Book to Fight Illiteracy

Goodreads has partnered with First Book, a charity group whose mission is to make sure children who reside in low-income communities are able to have access to books. Together, these two organizations will be fighting illiteracy using the Goodreads Book Club.

Every time 10,000 Goodreads members add A Visit From the Goon Squad to their shelves, the organization promises to donate 1,000 books. So far, 25,000 members have added the book. If another 5,000 members follow, then Goodreads will provide 3,000 books.

Here’s more from the site’s blog post: “Our initial goal is to donate 5,000 books—which means we need 50,000 people to add A Visit From The Goon Squad by August 2, when the Book Club concludes with a live video chat with author Jennifer Egan. If more than 50,000 people add the book before the end date, we will honor our pledge and donate up to 10,000 books!”

O’Reilly on Amazon/Shelfari: Web 2.0 Consolidation Begins

Tim O’Reilly has some interesting observations concerning Amazon.com‘s acquisition of Shelfari earlier this week—starting with the fact that the current playing field for book-themed social networking appears to be dominated by Goodreads.com, and he’s got a chart to prove it:

social-networking-books.jpg

“Of course, that could change quickly if Amazon throws their muscle behind Shelfari and integrates it into their overall service,” O’Reilly notes, citing a trend where “companies with dominant share tend to get more dominant over time,” even when moving into new but related markets. “But here’s the counter,” he adds: “open and interoperable applications, including open social networks.” What if all the other social networks dedicated to books banded together and let their users communicate with each other over the fence, as it were?

O’Reilly doesn’t mention this, because his main emphasis is on the survival of the networks, but… the consequences of such a move for authors and publishers, who currently have to choose one bookish network upon which to focus their attention or else scramble to maintain some sort of presence on several of them, could be significant.

TurnHere Adds Partners, Launches Customizable Widget Player

In a press release issued yesterday, online video solutions platform TurnHere announced nearly one dozen new distribution partners, including Goodreads, LibraryThing and Buy.com, for its book-centric online channel Bookvideos.tv. In addition, TurnHere also unveiled a brand new customizable widget and enhanced video player for book publishers, which will expand the reach of author videos across the Web.

“TurnHere’s author videos are compelling content, and we think they are an excellent addition to our author profiles,” said Otis Chandler, founder and CEO of Goodreads. “We’re finding that seeing and hearing a favorite author in an on-page video is a very evocative experience, and we’re very excited to be working with TurnHere to provide it to our members.” Added TurnHere CEO and founder Bradley Inman: “As we continue to forge new relationships with a diverse range of Web partners, we are reaching a very engaged online audience never before tapped into by the publishing market.”

Web 2.0 Publishing Roundup

  • Booktour.com, whose existence we first announced on GalleyCat during BEA, has now gone live.
  • As first reported here yesterday morning, Shelfari and Facebook have teamed up to launch the Shelfari Facebook Application. [The Book Standard]
  • Compare and contrast the three main social networking sites for books: Shelfari, Goodreads and LibraryThing. [PW]
  • And now add a fourth one: LovelyBooks.
  • Google adds a Japanese partner in the form of the Keio University Library.