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Posts Tagged ‘Harold Bloom’

Gillian Blake Named EIC of Henry Holt and Company

Gillian Blake been named editor in chief of Macmillan’s Henry Holt and Company. She will report to publisher Stephen Rubin.

Blake joined Henry Holt in 2009 as executive editor, months after HarperCollins shuttered the division in a massive restructuring.

Here’s more from the release: “She recently edited the runaway bestseller STORIES I ONLY TELL MY FRIENDS by Rob Lowe. Prior to joining Holt, she held positions at Scribner, Bloomsbury and Harper Collins publishers where she edited best-selling authors Harold Bloom, Robert Sullivan, Peggy Orenstein, Steven Johnson, Russell Brand and award-winning author Adrian LeBlanc.”

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Poetry Slams Slammed

CPSPcoversmall.jpgDespite the fact 80 cities have joined the national poetry slam competition and President Barack Obama threw an exclusive White House slam, the “originator” of the poetry slam is worried about the health of the genre.

Poet and slam founder Marc Kelly Smith told the NY Times: “Now there’s an audience, and people just want to write what the last guy wrote so they can get their face on TV … We’ve got too much of that. This show wasn’t started to crank out that kind of thing.”

In addition, the article rounds up other famous attacks against poetry slams. Harold Bloom once labeled the popular form “the death of art,” and poet Jonathan Galassi called it “kind of karaoke of the written word.” For supporters, the essay points to Susan B. A. Somers-Willett‘s scholarly take on the genre, “The Cultural Politics of Slam Poetry.”