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Posts Tagged ‘Haruki Murakami’

Why Haruki Murakami Translated ‘The Great Gatsby’

The great Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami once translated The Great Gatsby for Japanese readers. In Columbia University Press’ In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means anthology, you can read an essay he wrote about translating the book.

We’ve embedded the complete essay below. Murakami expressed his love for the novel, but also gave readers a peek into how he used his “imaginative powers as a novelist into play.” Just in time for the upcoming movie adaptation, read his thoughts about F. Scott Fitzgerald‘s novel. Here is an excerpt:

When someone asks, “Which three books have meant the most to you?” I can answer without having to think: The Great GatsbyFyodor Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, and Raymond Chandler’s The Long Goodbye. All three have been indispensable to me (both as a reader and as a writer); yet if I were forced to select only one, I would unhesitatingly choose Gatsby. Had it not been for Fitzgerald’s novel, I would not be writing the kind of literature I am today (indeed, it is possible that I would not be writing at all, although that is neither here nor there) … Though slender in size for a full-length work, it served as a standard and a fixed point, an axis around which I was able to organize the many coordinates that make up the world of the novel.

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Haruki Murakami: “Writing a Long Novel Is Like Survival Training.”

Over at The Atlantic, Pakistani novelist Mohsin Hamid discussed one of his “all-time favorite passages in literature,” a quote from the Japanese author Haruki Murakami.

Talking about his own journey as a writer, Murakami explained: “writing a long novel is like survival training. Physical strength is as necessary as artistic sensitivity.”

If you want to get in shape this year, we found some free fitness apps for writers to help you feel better as you write. Also check out our how to write like Haruki Murakami post, taking writing wisdom from his epic novel, 1Q84.

Haruki Murakami Has 2/1 Odds to Win Nobel Prize on Thursday

award.jpgThe Nobel Prize for Literature winner for 2012 will be revealed on Thursday.  Currently, the UK gamblers at Ladbrokes have given Haruki Murakami 2/1 odds to take the $1.2 million prize.

At the same time, Chinese author Mo Yan has 8/1 odds, Canadian short story master Alice Munro has 8/1 odds and Hungarian writer Peter Nadas has 8/1 odds. Who do you want to win?

Here’s more about the award: “Those entitled to nominate candidates for the Prize are the members of the Academy, members of academies and societies similar to it in membership and aims, professors of literature and language, former Nobel laureates in literature, and the presidents of writers’ organisations which are representative of their country’s literary production. Proposals in writing for the year’s laureate must reach the Nobel Committee by January 31st. A proposal should, but need not, be accompanied by supporting reasons. It is not possible to propose oneself as a candidate, i.e. the Nobel Prize cannot be applied for. There are usually about 350 proposals each year.” (Via Michael Orthofer)

‘Gone Girl’ Library

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn rocketed to the top of the Indie Bestseller List this week following some great reviews and BEA buzz.

The summer thriller is filled with enough suspense and twists to keep any beach reader happy, but it is also a book about writing. The main characters are avid readers, and they write letters, articles, journals, kid’s books and memoirs. The novel references other books, little Easter eggs nestled in the plot.

We’ve rounded up our five favorite book references in the thriller, building a spoiler-free library for anybody who wishes they could keep reading Gone Girl

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Paperback Boxed Set Design Revealed for 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

Vintage and Anchor Books art director John Gall has revealed the design for the paperback edition of 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami.

We’ve embedded a photograph above–what do you think?

The New York Times had more details: “Gall, the art director for Vintage, designed the paperbacks to be visible through a clear plastic box, fitting together to create one image. The list price is $29.95, and Vintage will initially print 50,000 copies.” (Image link via Sarah Weinman)

Jennifer Weiner Analyzes Gender Balance in NYT Fiction Coverage

Novelist Jennifer Weiner has made a count of men and women reviewed by the New York Times last year.

Overall, Weiner (pictured, via)  found that out of 254 fiction reviews, nearly 60 percent of the featured books were written by men. Her long essay also counted authors reviewed multiple times by the newspaper. Follow this link to read the whole report.

Check it out: “Finally, of the works of fiction whose authors were reviewed twice (either with two full reviews, or review plus roundup) and profiled, one was a woman and ten were men. The men who received two reviews plus a profile were David Foster Wallace, Albert Brooks, Julian Barnes, Kevin Wilson, Nicholson Baker, Tom Perrotta, Russell Banks, Jeffrey Eugenides, Haruki Murakami and Allan Hollinghurst. The only woman who received two reviews plus a profile was Tea Obreht.”

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David Guterson Wins 2011 Bad Sex in Literature Award

David Guterson has won the Literary Review‘s Bad Sex in Literature Award for his novel, Ed King. The shortlist included books by Lee Child, Haruki Murakami and James Frey.

Washington Post book critic Ron Charles actually predicted the win in his review of the novel in early November.

Here’s more from Charles’ review: “I wouldn’t blame you for skipping this book entirely, but if you must, turn to page 236. What follows are three pages that might very well win the Literary Review’s annual Bad Sex Award, including my personal ‘ick’ moment: ‘Ed smelled vulnerably digestive.’”

Haruki Murakami Wins Best Fiction of 2011 Award

Earning more than 10,000 votes on Goodreads, Divergent by Veronica Roth has won the Favorite Book of 2011 Award at the social networking site for readers.

The list provides a fascinating look at what books readers (as opposed to critics) appreciated this year. Haruki Murakami won Best Fiction of 2011 award for 1Q84, counting more than 4,000 votes. Follow this link to see all the winners in 22 categories.

the winner of Best Non-Fiction – “The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth” by Alexandra Robbins which demonstrates how outcasts thrive after high school … In the most closely contested category, only seven votes (out of more than 40,000 votes cast in this category) separated the winner of Best Paranormal Fantasy of 2011, Shadowfever by Karen Marie Moning and the runner-up, A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness.”

 

Stephen King & Haruki Murakami on Bad Sex in Lit List

The shortlist for the Literary Review‘s annual Bad Sex in Literature Award has been released.

You can read the complete shortlist below–it includes Lee Child, Haruki Murakami and James Frey. This year the Literary Review has been active on Twitter, leading the Bad Sex Award hashtag on Twitter. Rowan Somerville won the award last year.

Literary Review has been tweeting bad sex passages online, including this scene from King’s 11-22-63: “Her head bonked on the door. ‘Ouch,’ I said. ‘Are you all right?’” (Via Huffington Post)

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Man Asian Literary Prize Longlist: Free Samples

The Man Asian Literary Prize longlist was announced today. For your reading pleasure, we’ve collected links to free samples of the books on the prestigious list.

The shortlist will be revealed in January and the winner will be announced in March.

Here’s more: “The Man Asian Literary Prize was founded in 2007. It is an annual literary award given to the best novel by an Asian writer, either written in English or translated into English, and published in the previous calendar year … The winning author is awarded USD 30,000 and the translator (if any) USD 5,000. Submissions are invited through publishers based in any country.”

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