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Posts Tagged ‘How To Pitch’

Showcase Your Writing Skills At This Literary Pub

OxfordAmericanThe Oxford American is an original. The mag is dedicated to a variety of writing — essays, memoirs, fiction and narrative non-fiction, all focused on the South. It’s also 100 percent freelance written. A “short” piece for the mag runs around 2,000 words, which is especially refreshing in an era when word count seems to be shrinking at an alarming rate.

Every section of the book is open to pitches. As assistant editor Maxwell George says: “We publish compelling narratives artfully rendered. It’s all at once down-home and cosmopolitan, cheeky and cultured, straightforward and cunning, just like the spirit of the South itself.” As for what kind of writing the editors want:

Because Oxford American favors narrative essay, short fiction and long-form journalism, beautifully written content is held at a premium. A new front-of-the-book section called “Points South,” comprised of short, dispatch-themed pieces, runs around 2,000 words. It’s an entryway for a lot of new voices coming into the mag, George adds. Freelancers may be asked to write pieces on spec, and because the OA has a reputation for harvesting great new talent (and some really good stuff from not-so-new talent, too), there’s a chance another publication will purchase its pieces and reprint them elsewhere.

For editors’ contact info and more, read: How To Pitch: Oxford American.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

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Narratively Seeks Storytellers Of All Media

Narratively

Narratively, the year-old New York-centric website, consists of writers, photographers and reporters who want to share in-depth human interest stories with the world.

The site values long form writing, and instead of sections or columns, they have weekly themes. As editorial director Brendan Spiegel says, “Our motto is: Any way you want to tell your story, we can do that.” All of the site’s content is generated by freelancers:

[The pub] has earned its reputation on the long-form text, [but] storytellers of all media are encouraged to pitch Narratively. Photo essays, short films, audio stories and comic boards are all game… In Narratively’s first comic text story, “The Real Mermaid,” an illustrator told a narrative non-fiction story about Coney Island’s Mermaid Parade.

For more details on pitching, read: How To Pitch: Narratively.

– Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Authors Can Promote Eco-friendly Books at Audubon

Audubon, one of the oldest continuously published magazines in the country, has been harvesting some of the best earth-minded writing for more than a century. The pub appeals to the well educated, politically active nature lover. Though the mag is the only pure nature magazine on the market, EIC David Seideman admits that the publication aspires to the reach and commercial success of National Geographic, while still maintaining its commitment to the thought-provoking, long-form type journalism of The Atlantic and The New Yorker.

Audubon regularly publishes eco-themed book reviews, and the website offers a unique promotional opportunity for authors. “If there are authors who have written books about environmental or nature subjects, and they would like to blog on our site to promote their book or run excerpts on the site, we would explore that opportunity with them,” explained Seideman.

For more info, read How To Pitch: Audubon.
ag_logo_medium.gifThe full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitch Your Fiction to Manhattan

After a somewhat rough start, Manhattan is starting to “hit its stride,” says EIC Cristina Cuomo. The pub, which launched in the midst of the financial crisis, is unlike other city mags since it’s more like a national book with local flavor. And Cuomo, whose first issue with the pub was September’s, is on a mission to “give the magazine a personality and a sense of humor.”

Among her changes? A new section called “The Fictionist,” which welcomes anyone with literary chops be they veteran or newbie authors. Writers can pitch short stories or book excerpts.

For more info, read How To Pitch: Manhattan. [subscription required]

Write for Thinking Mothers in Brain, Child

Brain, Child is not your typical parenting pub. It’s as much a literary mag as it is a parenting one, so it wants writers who can pen more than the usual service angle of most family mags.

The brainy book recently switched leadership, and its new editor in chief, Marcelle Soviero, said “I’m definitely keeping the major tenants of the magazine, which are that we’re a literary magazine for women and that we publish essays, short stories and a feature article in each issue.”

Soviero also said she hopes to develop a poetry section and expand the book reviews. Bonus: she loves working with new writers.  ”I’ve been that new author. I know what that’s like, and I always appreciated when magazines would take a chance on me. I like to do that for people, as well, as long as the work is excellent and meets our needs,” she said.

Read more in How To Pitch: Brain, Child: The Magazine for Thinking Mothers. [subscription required]

Market Your Publishing Experience to Writer’s Digest

Whether you’re a seasoned writer, an industry insider or someone looking to make their mark in the writing world, you can turn your experience into a byline for this mag. Writer’s Digest editor Jessica Strawser says her readers are looking for “specific ideas and tips that will help them succeed.”

However, make sure you hold authority in your proposed idea first. Strawser explained, “If you’re proposing an article on how to write a novel, we will expect you to have authored and published one.” Perspectives from writers who have “been there” are best.

Get more details in How To Pitch: Writer’s Digest. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

P&W Lists Top Literary Grants

As a publication dedicated to serious players in the publication and literary world, Poets & Writers is packed with inspiration and expert guidance needed for all stages of the writing process. There are no articles promising unrealistic fame and fortune, only practical advice, information, entertainment and opportunities for all talented writers.

One notable resource is P&W‘s extensive list of literary grants and awards, deadlines and prize winners. “Poets & Writers magazine provides the most comprehensive listing available in print,” said editor Kevin Larimer, “carefully vetted by the editorial staff to ensure that only legitimate prizes that will further the careers of winners are included.”

And if you know of an author who would make a great P&W profile, you could land a byline in the pub. Get best practices for pitching Larimer and his team in How To Pitch: Poets & Writers.