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Posts Tagged ‘Howard Jacobson’

Howard Jacobson at New York Public Library

The New York Public Library will host a funny evening with Man Booker Prize-winning author Howard Jacobson tonight.

You can purchase tickets here. The video embedded above features Jacobson reading an excerpt from The Mighty Walzer while two people play ping pong.

Here’s more from the event description: “Being funny should go without saying if you’re a novelist, Jacobson insists. In conversation with Paul Holdengräber, Howard Jacobson will discuss why any novelist who doesn’t make you laugh is short-changing you.”

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Marilyn Monroe’s Bookshelf, Dr. Seuss’ Rejected Manuscript & Man Booker Winner: Weekend Reading

As we head home for the weekend, we wanted to make sure you had plenty of publishing headlines to keep you busy. Email GalleyCat to get all our publishing stories, book deal news, videos, podcasts, interviews, and writing advice in a daily email newsletter.

We launched a new set of writer resources and extended our Book Pitch Contest–enter to win a free ticket to the eBook Summit in December.

We introduced you to seven authors who wrote while nude.

We took a peek at Marilyn Monroe‘s extremely literary bookshelf.

We covered , where we found out more about a publisher rescuing newspaper comics from oblivion (in the video embedded above).

GalleyCat readers voted to get their favorite author on Dancing with the Stars.

We explained why you shouldn’t click ‘Free Public Wifi’ networks while writing remotely.

Depression-era author, artist, and publisher Lynd Ward showed us ‘The Pleasure That Only Books Can Give.’

Two journalist shopped books about the Chilean miners’ ordeal.

National Book Award finalists were  announced for 2010.

An unpublished Dr. Seuss manuscript resurfaced at an auction.

We reported that adult hardcover sales sagged 24.4 percent in August.

Howard Jacobson won the Man Booker Prize for The Finkler Question

Still want more? Check out our Weekend Reading archives.

Howard Jacobson: From Ping Pong Player to Booker Winner

Novelist Howard Jacobson (pictured, far left) won the Man Booker Prize earlier this week. But before he won the prestigious award, he played ping pong.

In November, It Books will publish Everything You Know Is Pong: How Mighty Table Tennis  Shapes our World by Roger Bennett and Eli Horowitz. The ping pong history contains a short piece by the new Booker Prize winner,  along with other writers like Jonathan Safran Foer, Nick Hornby, and Will Shortz.

Here’s more from the publisher: “Congratulations to Howard Jacobson. Booker Prize Winner.  And contributor to our humble book (forthcoming November 2) for which he wrote a magnificent rumination on Table Tennis, The Life Pursuit. Here he is with two more of our heroes, Jerome Charyn and Steven Berkoff.  Do yourself a favor and purchase his Ping Pong novel, Mighty Walzer without delay.”

Howard Jacobson Wins Man Booker Prize for The Finkler Question

Author Howard Jacobson (pictured)  has won the Man Booker Prize, taking a prize worth nearly $80,000. Here’s more about his prize winning novel, The Finkler Question: “a scorching story of friendship and loss, exclusion and belonging, and of the wisdom and humanity of maturity. Funny, furious, unflinching, this extraordinary novel shows one of our finest writers at his brilliant best.”

We posted about Emma Donoghue‘s Room yesterday, exploring the strange list of titles on the bookshelf inside the cell where a mother and her 5-year-old son live. We also posted about how Tom McCarthy‘s C broke the bank in Booker Prize betting–earning £15,000 of bets in a single day.

Sir Andrew Motion chaired the panel of judges for the Booker Prize. The judges included: Rosie Blau, Deborah Bull, Tom Sutcliffe, and Frances Wilson.

Man Booker Prize Shortlist Announced for 2010

branding.jpgA few days after a NY Times review shredded his book (ignoring the novelist’s gorgeous treatment of two set pieces, the lives of World War I pilots and the emergence of wireless radio), Tom McCarthy has been shortlisted for the £50,000 Man Booker Prize.

Five other authors joined McCarthy, chosen from the the impressive longlist for the prize. The judges also picked Peter Carey, Emma Donoghue, Damon Galgut, Howard Jacobson, and Andrea Levy.

The judges had this statement: “It’s been a great privilege and an exciting challenge for us to reduce our longlist of thirteen to this shortlist of six outstandingly good novels. In doing so, we feel sure we’ve chosen books which demonstrate a rich variety of styles and themes — while in every case providing deep individual pleasures.”

The Jewish Book Network Puts Authors on Audition

One of the most common stories I heard throughout BEA came from authors who had survived one of the several evenings sponsored by the Jewish Book Network right before the trade show began. Almost American Idol-style, authors were asked to get up onstage, recite a two-minute speech about why Jewish Book Fairs and JCCs should invite them to their events, and wait for a judgment call to be awarded later. Nervewracking? Certainly. A story idea? Absolutely.

So it’s no wonder the NYTBR’s Rachel Donadio not only got to the idea first but sat in on one of those evenings, which featured a cavalcade of authors from M.J. Rose to Katharine Weber to Howard Jacobson and Charlotte Mendelson, two UK-based authors who’d flown in – on their own dime – to audition. None of these authors would have taken part if not for Carolyn Starman Hessel, director of the Jewish Book Network and in possession of an “uncanny ability” to get people excited about books and authors like Nathan Englander, Nicole Krauss and Jonathan Safran Foer, whose early careers owed some debt to the Book Fair circuit.

For most authors, Donadio writes, the audition experience is ” somewhere between JDate and a camel auction,” said Jeffrey Goldberg, a writer for The New Yorker who toured last year to promote PRISONERS his memoir about serving in the Israeli Army and befriending a Palestinian inmate. “Camels are very skittish, and so are writers. We don’t like having our teeth inspected. But if we’re going to sell, we know we have to have our teeth inspected.” His advice? “Do not follow the woman who just published a book on how all her children were murdered in Treblinka. It’s much preferable to follow a woman who has 100 halvah recipes.” Sound advice, to be sure.