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Posts Tagged ‘Jamie Byng’

Julian Assange Leaks Email Chain With Publisher

After having a disagreement over the process of his book release, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has done what he knows how to do best, published private communications.

Claiming that his new book Julian Assange: The Unauthorized Autobiography was published “in breach of contract, in breach of confidence, in breach of my creative rights and in breach of personal assurances,” Assange has posted an email correspondence between himself and his publisher Jamie Byng at Canongate.

Here is part of the exchange in which Assange questions the publishing industry’s definition of a memoir:

“Jamie: We have to cancel the contract as it is because it doesn’t seem it’ll be a memoir. Julian: The publishing industry seems to be straightjacketed on what a memoir is. Jamie: We’ve got to be careful it doesn’t get out that the book’s been cancelled. I would like it to be between us that we’ve cancelled this agreement, if we can work out a new agreement simultaneously and a new payment structure.” (Via The New York Observer).

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World Book Night to Give Away One Million Books

On March 5, 2011, 20,000 givers will help donate one million books to U.K. readers for World Book Night.

Jamie Byng, Canongate Books managing director and World Book Night committee chairman, conceived the event back in 2009. A group of booksellers, librarians, authors, broadcasters and others have chosen a list of 25 books to give away (the complete list follows below). Only 20,000 people will be invited to give away books for the program. Prospective givers have until January 4th to sign up–they can go to the World Book Night website and explain in 100 words or less why they want to participate.

John Le Carré‘s The Spy Who Came in From the Cold made the cut, and he had this statement: “No writer can ask more than this: that his book should be handed in thousands to people who might otherwise never get to read it, and who will in turn hand it to thousands more. That his book should also pass from one generation to another as a story to challenge and excite each reader in his time–that is beyond his most ambitious dreams.”

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After 20 Years, Nick Cave’s Second Novel is Coming

nickcave-novel-2008.jpgOver at the Observer, Leon Neyfakh is reporting that Faber & Faber has bought a novel from Nick Cave, with lead editor Mitzi Angel describing the book, The Death of Bunny Munro, as the “centerpeice” of her first frontlist at Faber—that assessment coming from an interview by Cave’s agent, Jamie Byng, in The Bookseller last week. (UPDATE: Angel tells Neyfakh that Byng’s assessement is not quite accurate, but that the Cave novel is nevertheless a significant acquisition.)

That leads Neyfakh to speculate as to whether a novel from Cave, the former lead singer of the Birthday Party and, since 1984, the frontman of the Bad Seeds, represents the “sophisticated literary fiction with an emphasis on debut novels” that Angel was hired to bring to Faber, comparing the novel to projects from the previous Faber regime like Billy Corgan’s poetry and Courtney Love’s scrapbooks. But those of us who remember Cave’s And the Ass Saw the Angel, published back in 1989, aren’t so sure there’s a contradiction. Granted, our memories can be somewhat hazy two decades on, but we seem to recall it was a really good novel, although your tolerance for dialect-inflected narration may vary. (Fun fact: Cave once chewed us out on a nationally syndicated radio show when we called in to say how much his novel reminded us of Flannery O’Connor! But we still like him anyway!)

(pictures: Wikipedia)