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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Milliot’

Jim Milliot to Lead Publishers Weekly as Michael Coffey Retires

pwlogoEditorial Director Michael Coffey is retiring from Publishers Weekly in June after 26 years with the publication. Jim Milliot, who has been with the company for 21 years, will take the lead at the publication. Milliot and Coffey have served as a co-editorial directors since April 2010, when PWxyz LLC acquired the trade from Reed Business Information.

“Michael Coffey has contributed a valuable editorial viewpoint to Publishers Weekly, and I look forward to continuing to guide the magazine into the future as the tides of book publishing shift and change,” stated Milliot.

Coffey will keep his relationship alive with the publication as a contributing editor. “Working at PW has been a dream job. How lucky to duly report to an office every day where American publishers are sending all their books for you to read. And being part of an industry that has adjusted to and survived the digital revolution has been particularly gratifying,” stated Coffey.

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E L James Is Publishers Weekly’s Person of the Year

Today E L James became the first author ever named Publishers Weekly‘s Person of the Year, an annual award given to publishing leaders “shaping and, sometimes, transforming, the publishing industry.”

As part of the award, James will get a cover story and interview in the magazine. She joins a list of winners that includes David Shanks, Larry Kirshbaum, Jeff Bezos and Len Riggio.

Co-editorial director Jim Milliot explained the choice: “From boosting sales of print books through bookstores to putting a spotlight on a genre that had received little publicity, E.L. James’ impact on various parts of the book business cannot be overstated … She is well deserving of our Person of the Year award.”

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Lifestyle Bundles & High Speed Printing: The Future of Book Publishing Roundtable

Today we joined a small group of industry leaders and  journalists at the Future of Book Publishing Roundtable at the New York Public Library. The guest list ranged from publishing executives to bookstore professionals to self-publishing experts to authors.

Hosted by Chris Verlander, Kodak’s director of book segment marketing (pictured), the panel discussion was moderated by Jim Milliot, the editorial director at Publisher’s Weekly. Here are some highlights from the wide-ranging discussion.

Liz Scheier, the editorial director of digital content at Barnes & Noble, talked about success stories with eBook bundles. She said one unnamed publisher saw a massive increase in an author’s sales when they gave away the first book of a series for free. She also suggested publishers try “lifestyle bundles,” selling related eBooks together (like a pregnancy guide and a parenting handbook).

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Judith Rosen Promoted to Bookselling Editor at Publishers Weekly

1948-v1-150x.JPGPublishers Weekly has promoted New England correspondent Judith Rosen to bookselling editor. In September, Rosen will begin to cover the rapidly changing world of bookselling in addition to her New England coverage.

She will report to co-editorial director Jim Milliot. Rosen has written for the industry magazine since 1998. Her publishing career began at MIT Press and Beacon Press, but she has also worked at Harvard Book Store and WordsWorth Books.

Publishers Weekly owner George Slowik had this statement: “What is great about her approach to the topic is it will include all aspects of bookselling unconfined by type of store or even walls for that matter. Books make their way into the hands of readers in many unconventional manners and we intend to explore and illuminate those paths.”

Publishers Weekly Names New Publisher, Editorial Directors

logo2323.gifJust minutes after news broke that Media Source Inc. had acquired Library Journal and School Library Journal, Publishers Weekly has announced two big changes.

The publication tweeted the news: “New order at PW: Jim Milliot and Michael Coffey named co-editorial directors, Cevin Bryerman new publisher.”

Library Journal (LJ), School Library Journal (SLJ), and Publishers Weekly (PW) were all part of the Reed Business Information empire. In addition to editing LJ and SLJ, Brian Kenney was editorial director of PW. He will lead LJ and SLJ under its new ownership. Also leaving with Kenney is Ron Shank, who used to serve as group publisher of Reed’s publishing division. He will now serve as publisher at LJ and SLJ.

Reed’s Business Media president Jeff DeBalko wrote about the new editorial directors: “Jim’s work is widely read and respected by publishing industry executives and newsmakers, while Michael holds the reins of PW’s day-to-day operation, guiding features, composition, and coordinating the delivery of content to print and online outlets. Jim has been at PW for 20 years, and Michael has been with us for 22 years.”

Preliminary Settlement for AMS and B&T

PW Daily’s Jim Milliot reported yesterday that AMS and Baker & Taylor have reached a preliminary agreement to settle charges made by AMS that B&T wrongfully withheld $6.2 million when it made its final payment for the AMS assets it acquired. According to court documents, once the settlement receives the approval of the bankruptcy court judge, B&T will pay AMS $1.8 million. That figure consists of a payment of $6.05 million by B&T, minus $4.25 million AMS agreed to pay B&T under the transition services agreement between the two companies.

AMS Wants B&T To Pay Up

Thought there still wouldn’t be news about AMS, its bankruptcy, and resulting fallout? Think again. PW Daily’s Jim Milliot reported yesterday that Advanced Marketing Services filed a motion last week asking the judge who’s overseeing the company’s bankruptcy to force Baker & Taylor to pay AMS $6.2 million that AMS alleges B&T wrongly withheld when it made its final payment to acquire the majority of the bankrupt distributor’s assets. According to the motion, when the final installment came due in May, B&T paid $4.1 million rather than the $10.3 million that AMS had been expecting.

The decision to not pay the full amount, AMS said, is based on B&T’s “unfounded and patently erroneous interpretations” of the Asset Purchase Agreement. B&T alerted AMS that it was withholding the $6.2 million in an April letter from B&T CEO Richard Willis, and AMS said that its attempts to resolve the dispute since then have proved fruitless, prompting it to file the motion. AMS believes Judge Christopher Sontchi has it within his authority to decide the issue without any need for further discovery or an evidentiary hearing. The motion is set to be heard August 15 and objections can be filed by August 8.

What Are We Going To Do About the Gender Salary Divide?

10 years ago, the pseudonymous Morgan Cast revealed the sad, sad truth about publishing salaries: there isn’t a lot of money to go around. “While editors with their own imprints command six-figure salaries, editorial assistants start in the $18,000 range,” wrote Cast in the October 31, 1997 article for Salon. “If they stick with it, they might be promoted — after five or so years — to an associate editor’s job, which pays a whopping $28,000 to $34,000.” The news delivered by the then-3 year publishing veteran only got grimmer as the piece went on, culminating in what a Crown editor evidently “satisified” with the job put it. “I’ve given in to the notion that I love what I’m doing and I’ll never get paid what I’m worth in this industry.”

Cast’s piece back then had Publishers Weekly‘s salary survey as its statistical backbone, and with this year’s results just out, it’s helpful to look at data going back a few years.

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Rautenstrauch Leaving AMS?

That’s what PW Daily’s Jim Milliot is reporting in the wake of Baker & Taylor ‘s takeover of AMS assets. With the deal done, AMS CEO Gary Rautenstrauch was eligible to receive 70% of a bonus tied to the closing of the purchase, but it also meant that Rautenstrauch was out of a job since AMS intended to terminate Rautenstrauch when the deal was completed. No one at AMS was available to comment to Milliot on whether Rautenstrauch has indeed left.

The full announcement of B&T’s approved acquisition is also available, with more details on where business will take place. Baker & Taylor Marketing Services (the new name for the consolidated AMS) will continue to keep its primary office in San Diego and operate warehouses in Indianapolis, Indiana and Sacramento, California.

Today in AMS: Annual Meeting Delayed (again), More From Radio Free

The San Diego Union-Tribune reports that AMS has, as expected, postponed its annual meeting more than a month following the resignation of one of its directors. Robert Robotti resigned in the wake of the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing and he had advocated the company go ahead with its annual meeting slated for January 24 – a meeting that would have been the company’s first in four years. Now it’s been rescheduled for February 23, and the company named Marc Ravitz, executive vice president of New York’s Grace & White Co., to fill the vacancy left by Robotti. Grace & White, together with affiliated persons and entities, controls 12 percent of Advanced Marketing’s stock.

On the Perseus & PGW front, the bankruptcy court is still scheduled to meet on February 12 to decide whether the 70 cents on the dollar offer is doable. Publishers Weekly’s Jim Milliot and Claire Kirch report on the “alarm bells” set off by the potential deal. “How can we maintain our visibility when we are becoming an ever-smaller piece of a larger puzzle?” asked Michael Wiegers, executive editor at Copper Canyon Press, which is distributed by Perseus’s Consortium unit. Another Consortium client, Jim Perlman of Holy Cow Press, said he is concerned that with the addition of PGW, Consortium “will lose their ability to handle books with the knowledge and concern they’ve displayed in the past.” Several PGW clients voiced similar questions, wondering where they will fit in at Perseus. “The viability of our list in this marketplace depends in part on a fairly intimate familiarity with what we do,” one PGW publisher said, and another wondered what the “pecking order” will be when all the companies are combined.

As always, for the skinny on the failing fortunes of AMS, check out new offerings from Radio Free PGW. Today they look at the $19 million in books that AMS lost at their Indiana distribution center in 2004, why Perseus may require even longer “float” times than did PGW; and also point people to Mr. Popman’s Place for a breakdown of what might possibly be the real reason AMS hasn’t reported its earnings in several years (hint: a faulty computer system.)

Finally, a disgruntled AMS employee (or management type? Who knows) has decided to strike back. And so we get the lovely “AMS Has WMD” blog, which seems solely designed to take potshots at Radio Free PGW. Make of it what you will, whether from a trolling or humorous perspective…

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