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Posts Tagged ‘John Scalzi’

Ann Crispin Has Died

Author and Writer Beware co-founder Ann Crispin has passed away.

Making Light posted the sad news and novelist John Scalzi shared a tribute to the science fiction writer. Earlier this week, she posted a final message for readers and writers on Facebook:

I want you all to know that I am receiving excellent care and am surrounded by family and friends. I wish all aspiring writers the will to finish and a good contract. Please continue to monitor Writer Beware and be careful who you sign with. Victoria Strauss and Richard White are there to help.

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Nonfiction Book Proposal

Nonfiction Book ProposalStarting September 4,work with a literary agent to complete a full proposal that wins an agent and a contract! Ryan Harbage from The Fischer-Harbage Agency, Inc. will teach you how to convey your idea in a winning book proposal format, write your proposal letter, understand the nuts and bolts of the nonfiction book industry, and more. Register now! 

Authors Pose in Gender-Flipped Sexy Science Fiction Cover

To raise money for the Aicardi Syndrome Foundation, a team of five novelists posed for a gender-flipped posed copy of a sexy science fiction cover.

You can bid on an autographed copy of the photograph at eBay. Photographer Al Bogdan shot the picture, imitating the cover of Young Flandry by Poul Anderson. The io9 blog has more about the history behind the pin-up photograph.

Check it out: “This is one of only two 16″ x 16″ high-quality prints, and has been autographed by John Scalzi, Mary Robinette Kowal, Jim C. Hines, Patrick Rothfuss, and Charles Stross, as well as photographer Al Bogdan. This would be a GORGEOUS piece to frame and hang over your couch, in your bedroom, or even in your office at work. You’ll be the envy of everyone you meet! Best of all, every penny raised from this auction will go to the Aicardi Syndrome Foundation, supporting the girls and families fighting this condition and helping to fund research into the cause and, some day, a cure.”

Science Fiction Community Raises $40,000+ for One Writer’s Cancer Battle

Friends of science fiction author Jay Lake have united to raise money for his battle with cancer. They have already doubled the original fundraising goal of $20,000 for Lake (pictured).

As various levels of funding were reached, fellow science fiction writers unlocked special fundraising treats. For instance, author Patrick Rothfuss shared an excerpt from his high school novel and novelist John Scalzi sang a lost Bob Dylan song.

Here’s more from the fundraiser: However, a new technology is becoming available—one that may offer his doctors a better option for treating the cancer. We’re trying to raise funds to allow Jay to have whole genome sequencing. There is a small possibility that the results of such a test, which is more comprehensive than conventional genetic testing of tumors, may suggest a treatment path that Jay’s doctor’s may not have considered, and that could be life saving. It’s a really small chance, and Jay knows that. For this fundraiser, we have asked some science fiction and fantasy writers to donate an “Act of Whimsy” which they will share with the community as we reach milestones in our fundraising.

Read the Best Science Fiction of the Year

The 2012 Hugo Award winners have been revealed, honoring the best science fiction and fantasy writing of the year. 1,922 ballots were cast during the voting process.

Below, we’ve linked to free samples of all the winners–including the complete text of the winning novella, novelette, short story and graphic story. Be sure to check out John DeNardo‘s SF Signal blog, winner of the best fanzine award.

Here’s more about the awards:  “The 2012 Hugo Award winners were announced on Sunday evening, September 2, at the at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Chicago. The ceremony was hosted by Chicon 7 Toastmaster John Scalzi.”

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John Scalzi to Release Next Old Man’s War Novel as Episodic eBook

Science fiction novelist John Scalzi will release the next book in his Old Man’s War series as a digital episodic novel. The Human Division serial will begin in December.

Tor senior editor Patrick Nielsen Hayden outlined the strategy in the release: “The Human Division will be an experiment: an episodic novel, released initially in digital, serialized form. Currently the plan is to publish these episodes weekly between December 2012 through February 2013. Like the episodes of a good high-end cable drama, each one will have enough internal integrity to work as an enjoyable chunk of story on its own, but each will advance a ‘season’-long storyline as well.”

The book will be released in traditional formats next year, once the experiment has concluded. Hayden hopes that the price for the complete serialized novel will be “about the same as buying the full eBook.”

Why You Should Own Your Domain Name

Having an online presence is critical for writers to market their work. In a recent blog post, author John Scalzi urged writers to purchase their own domain name online.

Scalzi (pictured, via) reminded readers that before Facebook, Internet users migrated between AOL, Friendster, MySpace and other sites. He encouraged writers to use trendy tools to connect with readers, but stressed the importance of owning a steady domain like “www.yourname.com.”

Here’s an excerpt from his blog post: “If you’re going to be online, it’s best to have a site that isn’t at the whims of stock evaluation, or a corporate merger, or an ambitious executive’s ‘content strategy,’ or whatever. Ultimately, your online home should be something you control, and something you can point the people at Facebook (or MySpace, or Friendster, etc) to. Having one’s own domain isn’t always simple and has its own share of headaches (as you will find if you ever have the need to change your ISP), but at the end of the day what it has is stability.”

‘Old Man’s War’ To Be Adapted by ‘The Perfect Storm’ Director

John Scalzi‘s Old Man’s War will be adapted by The Perfect Storm director, Wolfgang Petersen. According to DeadlineDavid Self will write the script and produce for the science fiction adaptation.

Scalzi discussed the news on his blog: “The movie that is eventually made of Old Man’s War will be an adaptation of the book — not the book itself. The filmmakers are going to have to make changes…I wanted filmmakers I felt could best adapt what I wrote.”

Scalzi is a two-time Hugo Award-winning writer. After releasing Old Man’s War (2005), he followed up with three sequels: The Ghost Brigades (2006), The Last Colony (2007), and Zoe’s Tale (2008).

Wil Wheaton and John Scalzi Star in Fan Fiction Contest

scalzibig.jpgTo raise money for the Lupus Alliance of America, authors John Scalzi and Wil Wheaton have teamed up with Subterranean Press for a fan fiction contest. To enter, you have to write a 400 to 2,000-word story exploring the mythological event pictured here (after the jump, view a much larger version).

All kinds of stories will be accepted, except slash fiction. The winner will earn 10-cents a word for the story, take home a set of Subterranean Press books, and get published in a special eChapbook with stories by Scalzi, Wheaton, Catherynne Valente and Patrick Rothfuss. Deadline is 11:59 pm EST on June 30, 2010. Read all rules and submit here.

Here’s more about the picture: “[W]hat is Wil Wheaton doing astride a unicorn unicorn pegasus kitten, in the INFAMOUS clown sweater, aiming a spear at an Orc version of me? … neither Wil nor I know how we got to the point where we are in the picture. We are open to theories. Theories in the form of fanfic. That’s right: We’re looking for fan fiction which explains what the holy hell is going on in that picture. Because if ever a work was made for fan fiction exegesis, it is the image above.”

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Help Write the World’s Longest Literary Remix

Next month we hope to host the world’s longest literary remix, letting individual GalleyCat Reviews readers rewrite short passages from a piece of public domain fiction. UPDATE: There is still time to sign up. The writing challenge officially begins on Monday, May 3rd.

We were inspired by the Star Wars: Uncut project showcased in the video embedded above. The project divided the Star Wars film into snippets and gave hundreds of filmmakers the chance to re-shoot one 15-second scene. The surreal results made this GalleyCat editor giddy–one filmmaker substituted dogs for actors and another fan replaced a starship with a hamburger.

We want to do the same thing with a piece of public domain fiction from 19th Century–letting you rewrite a passage from the out-of-date story in your own unique style. You can turn a flowery Victorian soliloquy into a stark Cormac McCarthy scene; refurbish wooden dialogue with Virginia Woolf stream-of-consciousness style; or rewrite a dull description with technicolor Thomas Pynchon prose.

Please join us on this grand experiment. If people are interested, we will give out prizes of some sort (most likely books) and feature some individual entries on GalleyCat. We will repackage the final product into a free eBook (complete with illustrations) that you can share with the world. Every contributing writer will receive a byline and a short biography in the remixed book.

Are you in? Email us today with the subject line “GalleyCat Remix” and we will add you to the list of contributors. If enough people sign up, we will band together to remix a 19th Century bestseller full of cheesy adventure, purple prose, wooden dialogue, crazy sermons, and plenty of Bad Writing.

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John Scalzi Sells Fuzzy Nation to Tor Books; Rebooting a 1962 Science Fiction Novel

fuzzynation.jpgToday science fiction author and prolific blogger John Scalzi announced he’d sold a “reboot” of H. Beam Piper‘s 1962 science fiction novel Little Fuzzy to Tor Books. Publication is scheduled for next year.

Last week Scalzi revealed that he will revisit the classic novel in a new kind of book: “I took the original plot and characters of Little Fuzzy and wrote an entirely new story from and with them. The novel doesn’t follow on from the events of Little Fuzzy; it’s a new interpretation of that first story and a break from the continuity that H. Beam Piper established in Little Fuzzy and its sequels.”

Here’s more about the deal, straight from Scalzi’s blog: “I’m deeply pleased to have the book find a home with Tor, which has published all my novel-length fiction to date, and which is filled with excellent people who have been a delight to work with. I’m very happy to be working with them again.”

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