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Posts Tagged ‘Judith Regan’

Fritz Brantley, Ron Hogan & Michael Szczerban Join Regan Arts as Editors

reganartsJudith Regan has hired three editors for the newly launched Regan Arts.  Fritz Brantley, Ron Hogan and Michael Szczerban will join the new Phaidon division.

Senior editor Szczerban comes to Regan Arts from Simon & Schuster, where he was the recipient of the 2012 Lawrence Peel Ashmead Editorial Award. In his new role, Szczerban will acquire fiction and nonfiction, focusing on “transformative ideas,” “technology and culture,” and “why we are the way we are.”

Hogan, a former GalleyCat editor, comes to Regan Arts from Shelf Awareness where he served as contributing editor. In the new job, Hogan will acquire fiction and nonfiction, focusing on “current affairs,” “pop culture,” and “inspirational/entrepreneurial stories.”

Associate editor Fritz Brantley comes to the new imprint Routledge, where he served as editor and marketer. Brantley has also written for Oprah.com, Publisher’s Weekly, and the East Bay Express.

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SiriusXM Closes Book Radio Channel

Satellite radio provider SiriusXM has closed its SiriusXM Book Radio channel. In a statement to listeners, the company said “our commitment to books and authors remains high across many channels.”

A number of Book Radio shows have moved to other stations. The “Pia Lindstrom Presents” show has moved to SiriusXM Stars (SiriusXM channel 106) on Saturdays at 12 p.m. ET. Former Book Radio host Maggie Linton now has a daily show on SiriusXM Urban View (SiriusXM channel 110) running Monday through Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET.

Classic radio theater and stories continue on Radio Classics (SiriusXM channel 82), and audiobooks air on our “Late Night Read” show at night on SiriusXM Stars … Additionally, we will continue our “Author Confidential” series, featuring top authors, and former publisher Judith Regan continues her weekly interview show on Saturdays at 10am on SiriusXM Stars. We encourage you to tune in to a wide variety of author interviews and discussions on many of our shows and channels, including Bob Edwards on SiriusXM Public Radio (Sirius channel 205 and XM channel 121) and Pete Dominick on SiriusXM Indie (SiriusXM channel 104).

(Via R.L. Stine)

Judith Regan to Appear on The Millionaire Matchmaker

In December, former publisher and editor Judith Regan will be appearing on the reality television show, The Millionaire Matchmaker.

Here’s more from Gatecrasher: “Patti Stanger, host of ‘The Millionaire Matchmaker,’ tells us viewers will see ‘a softer side’ of the hard-driving former ‘Queen of All Media’ when Regan appears on the Bravo show Dec. 14. According to another source, the divorcee is on the hunt for ‘a funny guy.’”

Regan had previously worked at two houses, Simon & Schuster and HarperCollins. She discovered Wicked bestseller Gregory Maguire and courted controversy for preparing to publish O.J. Simpson manuscript, If I Did It. (Via NY Observer)

Well, I See By the Clock on the Wall…

Routine is a funny thing, especially on a professional level. It forces you to get up early every morning, perform a specific set of work-related tricks until the day is done, and then it’s time to get up early the next day and repeat the same process. For two years, routine has been my fall-back as I scoured for the best, relevant and occasionally bizarre bits of publishing-related news and commentary to share with GalleyCat readers.

After today, that routine will no longer exist. This is my last day here, after which Ron will take the site over as a solo act for the foreseeable future. Instead I’m creating a new routine, or perhaps an anti-routine: one with more freelance opportunities and larger projects to work on. One where I can spend more time on neglected matters: fiction-writing, my own crime fiction-centric site, or making some use of that forensic science degree after all. One with equal parts possibility and uncertainty. As to why now, the Jewish New Year – which begins tonight – probably has a lot to do with it. New Year, new beginnings, that sort of thing.

In other words: after two years, thousands of posts, scores of parties and readership that’s more than quadrupled since Ron and I took over GalleyCat in October 2005, it’s time to see what’s out there beyond the publishing industry’s idiosyncratic, mercurial and fascinating borders. I’m thrilled and scared, but risk has that effect on a person. And sad, too, because I’m going to miss so much here. When I first started, I had an amateur’s fascination with publishing. Now there’s more, but also so much I’ve still yet to learn. So most of all, thank you for being here as I tried to understand the way things work, from mergers & acquisitions (HM/Harcourt, Wottakar’s and Hachette/Time Warner Books, here’s looking at you) and bankruptcies (AMS/PGW) to more scandal-ridden fare (really, if not for James Frey, J.T. Leroy, Kaavya Viswanathan, and especially OJ and Judith Regan, there would be no GalleyCat in its current format.)

Thanks also to Elizabeth Spiers for the initial chance; Aileen Gallagher, Dorian Benkoil and Dylan Stableford for editorial support in the early innings and Rebecca Fox, Noah Davis and Chris Ariens for the same, late-in-the-game; Laurel Touby for continuing to push for breaking news and original content; my fellow bloggers-in-arms, departed and still current; and Ron, for being Adolph Green to my Betty Comden (even if I’m breaking up the act a lot sooner than they did.)

And while we’re on the team theme, had I been more tech-savvy there would have been a YouTube clip of my favorite childhood comedy duo delivering the goodbye song I reference in the subject header to open this post. But I’m not, so instead I’ll quote from the last lines:

Adieu, mon vieux, a la prochaine, goodbye till when we meet again!

Some sunny day, I suspect.

No Chance of Evanovich/Cannell Collaboration

When Warner Books – now, of course, known to one and all as Grand Central Publishing – first announced that Janet Evanovich and Stephen Cannell would be joining forces for a new series, it did so with a few hiccups. The deal was first posted, then taken back down, then put back again. It seemed a minor point, something to forget about – not a harbinger of things to come.

Earlier this month, Sarah Wendell at Smart Bitches, Trashy Books got a tip from an anonymous reader wondering why Evanovich’s site, after trumpeting the upcoming collaboration, no longer mentioned the book anywhere. Anonymous had read chapter one, posted on June 1, and when she went back on July 1, there was no chapter two – or chapter one, for that matter. And things got even stranger. “If you type “no chance” site:evanovich.com into a Google search, there’s remnants of quite a few pages – but they’re all 404s,” reported the tipster. “Meanwhile, Cannell used to have it on his news page, home page and appearances page – those mentions are gone, too.” An excerpt was still available on Cannell’s website as of July 9, and is now, but that’s about it.

And that’s about all we’ll see, thanks to Wendell’s update yesterday. According to her source at an unnamed Big Box Bookstore, “the Evanovich/Cannell novel NO CHANCE has ‘no chance’ of being published. The book has been canceled with no date for rescheduling.” When reached for comment yesterday evening, Evanovich confirmed the news. “Steve [Cannell] and I ran into scheduling problems,” she said by email. “We still have an active partnership but the project is on hold right now. As of right now we haven’t a publishing date.” Interestingly, the Amazon page remains active, though that may not be for much longer…

Random House Revolving Door Widens Editorial and Marketing/Distribution Dichotomy

Last week’s post about Daniel Menaker‘s exit and the larger implications for Random House served as unwitting inspiration for Sara Nelson‘s column in this week’s issue of Publishers Weekly. After recapping what she terms (and I concur is) a “stunning” number of job switcheroos at Random House, Nelson wonders if all the gossip and chatter misses the overall point: that none of the departing RH executives, going back to Don Weisberg, the COO of RH North America who left in February, were replaced with external hires:

That…suggests that Random is indeed shifting focus, but not necessarily in fiction. At worst, the piling on of new jobs to longtime staffers with already full plates is a form of downsizing; at best, it might be that Random, like most publishers, will soon move its emphasis from the acquiring/editing side of the business to the less sexy but increasingly important distribution and marketing side. Editors and authors will always matter-somebody, after all, has to create all that “content” that will be disseminated in forms perhaps not yet invented—but the focus these days is more on selling direct, on digital “product” and on POD.

Nelson’s larger point is a good one, but I suspect that emphasis already began quite a number of years ago, and not just at Random House. Most of those at the executive level – and by that I mean Publisher, CEO or something in between – tend to come up from the marketing, distribution and publicity sides, and yet if a new imprint is formed, it’s usually named after its founding editor (most recent examples: Spiegel & Grau at Doubleday/Broadway; Amy Einhorn Books at Putnam. At least Twelve, Jonathan Karp‘s imprint at Grand Central Publishing, was never going to be named after him.) Eponymous editorial imprints seem to follow a common trajectory: a big announcement spurring a flurry of news, commentary and speculation; an 18 month or so gestation marked by sprees of acquiring not out of place at 5th Avenue department stores; and after a few years – best personified by the fate of Rob Weisbach‘s imprint at William Morrow in the late 1990s – a near-permanent place in the loss-leading category for the publisher. Never mind the irony that the most successful eponymous imprint, ReganBooks, is no more, shuttered in favor of the more anonymous (and temporary) “HC” logo.

So if, as Nelson concludes, publishing houses’ energies are moving even more strongly towards the “less sexy” side of publishing, perhaps it may make sense to question the wisdom of imprints named after editors – especially when in the end – with the exception of one Ms. Judith Regan – they are just as anonymous to readers as are the marketing & distribution people. In other words (and keeping the elemental theme going) maybe it’s not a question of air or water but earth and fire.

Wow, A Movie Plays Fast and Loose With History? Who Knew?

It’s been ages since Edward Wyatt, now housed in LA and covering the film beat television, got anywhere near a publishing-related story (as Judith Regan is like, so six months ago) but his reporting on the not-quite controversy surrounding HBO’s very loose adaptation of Dee Brown’s BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE is as close as he’ll get now. The 1971 nonfiction book broke ground because it told the battle’s story from the perspective of the natives, but the HBO adaptation – produced by Dick Wolf and starring Adam Beach & Anna Paquin – adds a a new central character, a man who was part Sioux, was educated at an Ivy League college and married a white woman.

“Everyone felt very strongly that we needed a white character or a part-white, part-Indian character to carry a contemporary white audience through this project,” Daniel Giat, the writer who adapted the book for HBO Films, told a group of television writers earlier this year. “This was not an attempt to do the Ken Burns version of the Indian experience,” Wolf said to Wyatt in an interview. “It is a dramatization, and we needed a protagonist.” And that’s the thing: of course it would be nice to have historically accurate movies but, um, it’s a movie, not a documentary. Of course they are going to go for dramatic arcs even if they are fictionalized ones.

But such knowledge won’t satisfy everyone. Nicolas Proctor, Brown’s grandson and one of three people who oversees his estate, as well as an associate professor of history at Simpson College in Iowa, said that as a historian he was “always kind of shocked that history is not moving enough, is not evocative enough and rich enough to keep people from having to get in there and start monkeying around with it.” He said that the estate had no control over the film’s content.

Now It’s the Mother’s Turn

Sean Wilsey‘s 2005 memoir OH, THE GLORY OF IT ALL caused a stir within SF society for its warts-and-all description of the city’s movers and shakers – most of which were contained within his own family. Now his mother, Pat Montadon, has released her own memoir with the copycat title OH, THE HELL OF IT ALL. Not the original title, as the LA Times’ Robin Abcarian finds out. Montadon, who spend over a decade writing the book, originally called the book WHISPERS FROM GOD. But then her recollections landed with Judith Regan, who came up with the idea to steal borrow the cover concept and title from Wilsey’s book.

Montandon didn’t even know that HarperCollins (parent company of the Regan imprint) had changed her title until Wilsey called her with the news. “At first, Sean didn’t like it,” said Montandon. “He said, ‘Mom, they’ve ripped off my title!’ And I said, ‘Yes, they have Sean, and there’s nothing I can do about it.’ Then he became very accepting and said, ‘Well, it’s a good marketing ploy.’ ” But OH, THE HELL OF IT ALL, which details Montadon’s life, her marriage and divorce to Al Wilsey and her peace-promoting trips, is not a response to Wilsey’s account since Montandon had already written her memoir before her son wrote his. She allowed him to use her manuscript in the course of his research, and he quotes passages from her book in his. She did, however, make revisions after his book came out.

Wilsey, meanwhile, thinks his mother’s life is an apt topic for the big screen. “My total dream for my mom is that a really good documentary filmmaker will want to do her story and use all her material, some of which is mind-blowing, especially her meetings with world leaders,” said Wilsey. He even has a suggestion for a director. “Have you ever seen ‘Grizzly Man’? Werner Herzog would totally kick ass.”

The OJ Slow News Day Report

It looks as if Judith Regan‘s lawsuit against HarperCollins for firing her last December is still on, according to Radar’s Jeff Bercovici. After nearly producing an agreement, settlement talks between the controversy-courting publisher and the media conglomerate that fired her fell apart about three weeks ago, according to a source close to Regan. Had the deal gone through, Regan would have sidestepped a suit and avoid disparaging her former employers in exchange for around $6 million.

Meanwhile, Fred Goldman explained to Newsweek why the IF I DID IT auction is now a palatable idea for him and his family, despite mixed emotions. “[Goldman's attorneys] described the book as tantamount to a confession. Our concern about the gory specifics are relieved because those don’t exist in the book. Our original concerns have now changed dramatically, though the whole thing is very touchy and concerning for us.”

If They Auction It, Will Anyone Buy?

Last night’s news that Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Gerald Rosenberg ordered the bundled book rights to O.J. Simpson‘s ill-fated book IF I DID IT to be auctioned off leaves a weird taste in my mouth. Not because of any moral outrage – the time for such posturing has long since passed, especially as Judith Regan‘s kept her name out of the news for the bulk of 2007 – but because really, is anyone all that interested in the book anymore? Such perceived apathy may explain Simpson attorneys’ reaction to the ruling, which dictates that proceeds from the auction and any subsequent book profits will be turned over to Goldman’s family. “This is a guarantee that if they ever publish this thing, Mr. Simpson won’t see a dime from it,” Goldman family attorney Jonathan Polak said to the Associated Press.

“What they are seeking is whatever intangible property Mr. Simpson has relating to this book,” Simpson attorney Yale Galanter added.* “There isn’t a book. There isn’t anything.” Whatever the case may be, the Goldman family hopes the still-unscheduled auction will achieve some measure of balance. “We are going to continue to plug away and try to achieve justice,” Kim Goldman said outside of court.

*Ron is impressed at Galanter’s commitment to denying the book’s existence, really he is. He is also of the opinion that as long as Michael Viner still has money in the bank, there’s probably going to be at least one dog in this hunt.

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