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Posts Tagged ‘Jules Verne’

Rachel Louise Carson Gets Google Doodle for Her 107th Birthday

Carson

A new Google Doodle has been unleashed to celebrate the 107th birthday of National Book Award-winning author and marine biologist Rachel Louise Carson.

According to The Washington Post, Carson became well known for her bestselling nonfiction titles: Under the Sea Wind, The Sea Around Us, The Edge of the Sea, and Silent Spring. In fact, Silent Spring has been credited as the work that “ignited the modern environmental movement.”

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Museum of Science Fiction to Open in Washington D.C.

A team of science fiction fanatics plan to establish a comprehensive science-fiction museum in Washington D.C. The organizers behind the Museum of Science Fiction includes executive director Greg Viggiano, chief curator Phil Smith, director of project management David Hart, and VP of museum operations Mandy Sweeney.

The team has already launched an official website for the museum. Wired reports that the finished museum, slated for opening in 2017, will display “a dizzying array of characters, props and other awesomeness from Star Trek, Dune and the novels of Isaac Asimov to name just a few. There’s also plans for a life-size replica of H.G. Wells’ time machine and a 1:10 scale model of the Nautilus from Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.”

We’ve embedded a video about the project above. The organizers have launched an Indiegogo campaign to raise $160,000 that will be used to secure a location for a preview museum. Items that will be shown include an 11-foot Starship Enterprise-E filming prop and a Doctor Who TARDIS police box. The opening of the preview museum is scheduled to take place in 2015. (via The Washington Post)

Lithographs of Books on Tshirts & Tote Bags

lithographLooking for holiday gift ideas for the bibliophile in your family? Then you must check out Lithographs’ beautiful collection.

The company has made lithographs of famous books and then turned these into prints, t-shirts and tote bags. Here is more about the designs from the company’s website: “Our designs were created by a team of artists from all over the world. From a distance, the artwork illustrates a theme, character, or setting from each book. Move closer and the text becomes fully legible.”

The collection includes Charles DickensA Tale of Two Cities, James Joyce‘s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Jules Verne‘s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea to name a few. The t-shirts cost $34.99 plus shipping and they have men’s and women’s sizes. Unframed posters are $24, and totebags are $29.

Celebrate Franz Kafka’s Birthday with a Google Doodle & Free Books

Google has created a Google Doodle to celebrate Franz Kafka’s 130th birthday. Follow these links to download a free copy of The Metamorphosis and The Trial.

The designers drew inspiration from The Metamorphosis. Published in 1915, the famous novella follows the surreal ordeal of a salesman named Gregor Samsa. Here’s more from TIME magazine:

The drawing shows a lighter take on Kafka’s absurdist work, portraying a cockroach coming home from a day at work. The Doodle even includes a nod to the plot by including a small, sepia-toned apple, referring to the apples that the poor salesman’s father threw at him when he found his son transformed into the creepy-crawler.

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Edward Gorey Gets a Google Doodle

Google has created a Google Doodle celebrating author and illustrator Edward Gorey‘s 88th birthday.

Gorey established his artistic career working as a book designer at Doubleday Anchor. From there, he went on to write and illustrate more than one hundred books. He wrote under a number of pseudonyms; two of them, Ogdred Weary and Mrs. Regera Dowdy, are anagrams of his actual name.

Here’s more from The Huffington Post: “With a distinct style, often described as ‘whimsical’ and ‘grim’, Gorey’s pen and ink illustrations often depicted animals, as is shown in the Google doodle. The doodle also pays homage to Gorey’s most famous book, The Gashlycrumb Tinies, which depicts the deaths of 26 children, each representing a different letter of the alphabet.”

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Jules Verne Gets Google Doodle for His Birthday

The classic science fiction author Jules Verne received his own Google Doodle today–U.S. readers will see an image of the Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea submarine’s portholes as they search with Google.

Verne was born on this date in 1828. According to UNESCO’s Index Translationum database, Verne is the third most translated author in the world–only topped by Walt Disney and Agatha Christie.

Other Google Doodles have honored Jane AustenOscar Wilde, Agatha Christie, and Ahmad Shawqi. (Via Publishers Weekly)

Disney Shelves Michael Chabon’s Adaptation of Jules Verne Novel

DSC_0357.jpgDisney has stopped production on a projected $150-million adaptation of a classic Jules Verne novel, a script co-written by novelist Michael Chabon (pictured, via).

According to the LA Times, Walt Disney Studios head Rich Ross axed the project that began under his predecessor; an adaptation entitled: “Captain Nemo: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.” The film studio had already spent a reported $10 million assembling the crew for the movie. Towards the end of the article, an anonymous source speculated that production could eventually resume.

Here’s more from the article: “Chabon, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of ‘The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay,’ had just written a draft of the Burbank studio’s forthcoming production ‘John Carter of Mars,’ an adaptation of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel and the first live-action film to be directed by Pixar Animation Studios director Andrew Stanton.” (Via.)

Now it’s Google Book & Map Search

The debate about whether Google Book Search is a good thing or a bad thing is a topic that the New Yorker’s Jeffrey Toobin handles very well, but for those in the latter camp, they likely won’t appreciate Google’s newest invention, which will let people plot on maps references to places they find in books. ItWorldCanada reports that book entries in Google Book Search may include a section called “Places mentioned in this book.” The section includes a map from Google Maps with pins indicating places included in the text. Below the map is a list with the name of the places, linked to the pages in which they are mentioned and an excerpt from the text.

“When our automatic techniques determine that there are a good number of quality locations from a book to show you, you’ll find a map on the ‘About this book’ page,” wrote David Petrou, a Google software engineer, in the official Book Search blog, on Thursday. “We hope this feature helps you plan your next trip, research an area for academic purposes, or visualize the haunts of your favorite fictional characters.” At the moment, you can do that with public domain classics like Jules Verne‘s AROUND THE THE WORLD IN EIGHTY DAYS and Leo Tolstoy‘s WAR AND PEACE. But as expected, Google plans to expand this feature further.