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Posts Tagged ‘Katie Roiphe’

My Favorite Breakup Book

What book did you read while coping with a breakup? During one particularly lonely breakup years ago, I read Herman Melville‘s Moby Dick in an unhinged reading marathon.

No one will ever include this book on a list of breakup books, but it is the perfect thing to read with a broken heart. The book will fill your lonesome hours with a compelling story, make you forget about love and relationships, and, most importantly, drag you into an obsessive, turbulent and self-destructive universe that mirrors your own state of mind.

Follow this link to download a free copy of Moby Dick to save for your next breakup.

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The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Ayelet Waldman Attacks Katie Roiphe on Twitter

In a series of recent tweets, novelist Ayelet Waldman bashed author Katie Roiphe–defending her husband, Michael Chabon, in the Twittersphere.

Here is the complete set of tweets: “I am so BORED with Katie Roiphe’s ‘I like the sexist drunk writers’ bull****. She happily trashes my husband, but guess what b****? … He not only writes rings and rings and rings around you, but the same rings around your drunken literary love objects … Really Roiphe? You seek ‘slightly greater obsession w/ the sublime sentence.’ My husband’s sentences are INFINITELY more sublime than yours.”

She ended the Twitter tirade with this note: “I do not like it when people insult those I love.”

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Sex and the 21st Century Male Writer

updike23.pngCan contemporary male authors write a good sex scene? In a NY Times Book Review essay this weekend, cultural critic Katie Roiphe argued that male authors have lost their taste for steamy sex.

Here’s a sample: “The current sexual style is more childlike; innocence is more fashionable than virility, the cuddle preferable to sex. Prototypical is a scene in Dave Eggers‘s road trip novel, ‘You Shall Know Our Velocity,’ where the hero leaves a disco with a woman and she undresses and climbs on top of him, and they just lie there.”

The article comes complete with hot pink charts measuring sex scenes by writers like John Updike (pictured, via) against David Foster Wallace‘s generation–rating the rusults on a thermometer scale ranging from “Cuddling” to “Sex” to “Outrageous Behavior.”

What do you think? A Jewish Daily Forward essay argues the opposite: “We are a different society, not in terms of how we have sex, but in terms of its public presence–it takes eleven mistresses to raise our dander. Writers no longer feel compelled to up the ante; in fact, today’s shy literary heroes may be reacting genuinely to our over-saturated culture, a culture that feeds us false ideals of how and when we’re supposed to get it on.” (Via Ami Greko)

Undressing the Stripper Memoir

23Candygirldiablocody.jpgOver at DoubleX, cultural critic Katie Roiphe analyzed the bestselling genre of the stripper memoir, an unromantic look at a titillating bookshelf.

The essay outlines nine conventions that play out over and over in these books, perhaps laying the groundwork for a theoretical better stripper memoir. Among others, the essay looks at Diablo Cody‘s “Candy Girl,” Ruth Fowler‘s “Girl, Undressed,” and Lacey Lane‘s “Confessions Of A Stripper.”

Here’s a sample: “It is puzzling that such promising and prurient subject matter would lead to such flat books. This stylized form of sexuality seems to lend itself to cliche. In all of these memoirs, there is something false in the revelation and mechanical in the execution, that is–if we take the word of these bored and jaded ladies–something like stripping itself.” (Via Raquelita)