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Posts Tagged ‘Katniss Everdeen’

Jennifer Lawrence To Play Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games Adaptation

Winter’s Bone actress Jennifer Lawrence will play Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games film adaptation. As of this writing, fans have left more than 380 comments on Facebook, many protesting the choice.

We’ve included some of the comments below. Some complain that Lawrence (pictured, via) is too “old” because she is 20-years-old. In the first book, Katniss is 16. Others find fault with her appearance; Lawrence has blond hair, milky-colored skin, and blue eyes. Author Suzanne Collins describes Katniss as being a brunette with an olive complexion and gray eyes.

Robert Pattinson, who plays Edward Cullen in The Twilight Saga, has said in past interviews that his hiring was met with initial fan protest. These days, Pattinson enjoys great popularity and has even gotten mobbed during outdoor movie shoots. What do you think?

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Gary Ross Reveals How He Scored the Director’s Chair for ‘The Hunger Games’

book 1 collins.JPGDirector Gary Ross beat Sam Mendes (Revolutionary Road), David Slade (The Twilight Saga: Eclipse), and Susanna White (Nanny McPhee Returns) in his bid to direct The Hunger Games adaptation. According to an L.A. Times article, the director brought more than just his resume to the interviews.

Here’s more from the article: “when Ross met with Lionsgate for the first time, he brought a persuasive piece of video — interviews he’d shot of his kids’ friends explaining why the books mattered to them, and what they loved about the series’ heroine, Katniss Everdeen. ‘What was amazing was how insightful these kids were about this book and about Katniss as a character,’ says producer Nina Jacobson. ‘It was so clear that Gary was interested in what the fans cared about.’”

Author Suzanne Collins recently talked about the process of writing the first draft of The Hunger Games movie script. Back in October, Jacobson predicted that the film will have a PG-13 rating. (Via io9)

Suzanne Collins on Drafting ‘The Hunger Games’ Script

book 1 collins.JPGIn a recent interview, Suzanne Collins gave readers a peek at the process of adapting The Hunger Games for the screen–recognizing that changes are usually a necessary evil in the adaptation process.

Shelf-Life offered this quote from Collins who recently undertook the script-writing process: “Obviously, you have to let things go, but it’s more than a question of condensation. You want to preserve the essence while making the film stand on its own. It’s an art in itself.”

After Collins wrote the first draft for The Hunger Games script, screenwriter Billy Ray took over for revisions. Before she wrote books full-time, she worked as a writer for children’s television shows on Nickelodeon.

Powell’s Books Wins a Visit from Suzanne Collins

mockingsmall.jpgPowell’s Books has won Scholastic’s Mockingjay in-store display contest. The bookstore constructed a 17-foot cornucopia to beat out the rest of the competition. Their prize? A visit from Suzanne Collins at their West Burnside location on Sunday, November 7th.

Powell’s staffer Suzy Wilson had this statement in the release: “A visit from The Hunger Games series author, Suzanne Collins, is better than birthdays and snow days! We are ecstatic for the legions of Mockingjay fans in our area—many of whom waited for hours for the midnight release—to have won the Scholastic contest. It is an amazing opportunity for all those passionate readers to meet their favorite author. The celebration continues, and costumes are not required…but welcomed.”

Publishers Weekly has the Powell’s Books a picture of the staff in costume. New York City’s Books of Wonder hosted a Collins visit during a Mockingjay midnight release party. Owner Peter Glassman offered these thoughts on the trendiness of YA series, ” I think what’s really great is that adults aren’t afraid anymore of being seen reading kids’ books. It’s okay for a grown-up to enjoy children’s literature.”

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