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Posts Tagged ‘Kristin Nelson’

Ally Carter Lands Deal for New YA Series

Young adult novelist Ally Carter has signed a deal with Scholastic for the Embassy Row trilogy. Carter is the author of the Heist Society and Gallagher Girls series.

The publisher plans to release the first installment in 2015. Publisher David Levithan negotiated the agreement with Nelson Literary Agency president Kristin Nelson. Here’s more from the release:

This exciting new series focuses on Grace, who can best be described as a daredevil, an Army brat, and a rebel. She is also the only granddaughter of perhaps the most powerful ambassador in the world, and Grace has spent every summer of her childhood running across the roofs of Embassy Row. Now, at age sixteen, she’s come back to stay— in order to solve the mystery of her mother’s death.

(Image via)

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Hugh Howey Lands Simon & Schuster Book Deal

Formerly self-published science fiction novelist Hugh Howey has inked a book deal with Simon & Schuster to publish Wool in March 2013.

Nelson Literary Agency agent Kristin Nelson negotiated the deal with senior editor Karyn Marcus. Since he self-published the book in July 2011, Howey has sold 300,000 eBook copies of his novella series, landed a book deal in the UK and saw his book optioned for film.  Here’s more from the release:

Wool is the thrilling story of a post-apocalyptic world in which a community lives in a giant silo underground, hundreds of stories deep. Inside, men and women live within a society full of regulations they believe are meant to protect them from the toxic outside world. But a new sheriff is about to be entrusted with fixing her silo, and she will soon learn just how deeply her world is broken. The silo’s inhabitants are about to face what their history has only hinted about and never dared to whisper: Uprising.

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‘Legend’ Author Marie Lu on Social Networking & Writing YA Fiction

Marie Lu‘s debut novel, Legend, hits the shelves tomorrow. We caught up with Lu (pictured, via) to learn more about how authors can utilize social networking tools, the writing process for the book and her views on being an Asian-American author. The highlights follow below…

Q: How did you land your book deal?
A: My agent, Kristin Nelson, first took me on for a novel that we ultimately didn’t sell. While we waited for feedback on that one, I began writing Legend. After two intense rounds of edits with Kristin, we submitted Legend to publishers in the summer of 2010, and I recall shrieking in my apartment when Kristin told me it was going to auction with six interested publishers. Legend sold to Penguin a couple of weeks later!

Q: You drew inspiration for Legend from watching a musical production of Les Miserables. During the writing process, did you consult with Victor Hugo‘s Les Miserables?
A: It’s odd–Les Miserables triggered the first flash of inspiration for Legend (a criminal versus a detective-like character), but after that, I never referred to it again. I think the story just started going in a completely different direction. I did consult Ender’s Game and Ender’s Shadow a few times for inspiration on how to write from the point of view of a child prodigy.

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Ally Carter Lands Two-Book Deal with Disney-Hyperion

Disney-Hyperion has acquired two books from children’s series author Ally Carter (pictured).

The publisher acquired the second book in the Heist Society series, Uncommon Criminals–it’s set for a June 21st release. The publisher also acquired the fifth, untitled book in Carter’s Gallagher Girls series–it’s scheduled for a spring 2012 release.

Editorial director Stephanie Lurie negotiated the deal with literary agent Kristin Nelson of the Nelson Literary Agency. Senior editor Catherine Onder will edit the books. Warner Brothers has already optioned Heist Society for a film adaptation. Carter will appear at Leaky Con 2011 in July.

Macmillan vs. Amazon vs. Readers

11gEvSNO43L._SL150_.jpgSunday night Amazon wrote that they would “capitulate” to Macmillan’s eBook pricing model, but the online retailer has still not resumed directly selling books by the publisher (as of this 4:11 p.m. EST update). In addition, Amazon stock slipped at closing time for the second day in a row.

Earlier today, the Authors Guild defended Macmillan and criticized Amazon’s “bullying tactics” in an email alert to members entitled “The Right Battle at the Right Time.” Meanwhile, some Amazon customers continue to boycott Kindle books priced higher than $9.99. As of this writing, 1,435 different comments have been posted in response to Amazon’s note to customers about the price war.

UPDATE 4:30 p.m. EST: The NY Times reports: “some Macmillan books were creeping back” this afternoon. Yesterday we interviewed O’Reilly’s Andrew Savikas about the price fight, and he shared some of his own experience: “when we raised the price of an iPhone app from $5 to $10, sales fell by 75 percent overnight. That’s a pretty loud and clear signal from the market.”

Finally, Macmillan author John Scalzi rejected calls for a boycott today, instead urging readers to buy books by Macmillan writers–helping the people most directly hurt by the stand off. After the jump, GalleyCat readers shared indie bookstores around the country where you can find Macmillan titles.

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More on S&S’s Boilerplate Contract Changes

Simon & Schuster‘s boilerplate contract change to exclude a minimum threshold for determining whether a book should stay in print or not continues to get traction. AP’s Hillel Italie offers his own summary but also includes an intriguing nugget from an interview with S&S CEO Jack Romanos, who said that in an ideal market the only books he could envision going out of print were time-sensitive works such as tax guides – and that fiction titles especially should never go out of print. That opinion was seconded by HarperCollins president and CEO Jane Friedman, also interviewed by Italie last week. “No. In one word, no. There is no reason for a fiction title to go out of print, because you never known when there is going to be an audience for that book,” she said.

Which brings us back to print-on-demand. In a follow-up email, S&S spokesman Adam Rothberg explained that the earlier version of the boilerplate contract “reflected a time when p.o.d. was nascent and not-ready for prime time. This brings it into the era when p.o.d. is an established printing technology and p.o.d. books are readily available for sale.” But agent David Black told the NYT’s Motoko Rich that in reality, if a book is available only through print-on-demand, “an author’s book is going to be available in dribs and drabs.” He added: “If there is the possibility that I can take this book and place it somewhere else where somebody is going to publish it more aggressively than on a print-on-demand basis, shouldn’t I have the opportunity to do that?”

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When Being Dooced Is Only One Side of the Story

Sometimes, even us freewheeling bloggers like to exercise a little restraint. Because reporting on publishing people getting fired for what’s clearly a case of going overboard on a small matter is, frankly, not the best use of our time and resources. But since Gawker‘s now gone ahead and presented their (extremely flawed) version of Jason Pinter‘s abrupt exit from Crown, it seems like a good idea to present a more well-rounded, if still somewhat unattributed account of what precipitated this event.

First, the obligatory disclosure: I count Pinter as a friend, someone who bought another friend’s book and has also written a seriously kickass debut thriller that is (deservedly) receiving a good deal of pre-publication buzz. So much for objectivity, but don’t take my word for it, see what agent Kristin Nelson said (albeit without mentioning Pinter specifically by name) late last week: “it’s so sad when I get the news of a departure. Someone I liked. Enjoyed working with. Knew their tastes and what would work for them. Now I’ll have to scout out whoever fills their shoes. See who gets added to the dance card.”

But I’m getting ahead of myself. When reached for comment, Crown publicity director Tina Constable would only say that Pinter is no longer with the company and had no further comments, but Gawker is correct that Pinter’s termination resulted from the now-deleted blog post comparing and contrasting Chris Bohjalian‘s B&N-related success to Ishmael Beah‘s Starbucks-induced sales. Sources indicate that Crown publisher and senior vice president Steve Ross ordered Pinter to take the post down on February 23, which he did. A week later, without any warning or any indication that there would be further action taken, Pinter was informed he had violated Random House’s blog policy and had one day – last Friday, March 2 – to collect his things, inform his authors that he would no longer be working with Crown and absorb what had just happened.

Sources indicate that Pinter’s termination was not an easy decision, as a visibly upset Ross, as well as publisher Jenny Frost, were forced to do so at the behest of more senior Random House brass. Such sentiments are understandable considering the post in question never even made mention of Bookscan numbers – that was added in later, by me, after checking with additional sources. And from what I understand, access to Bookscan is hardly proprietary information – it’s not like actual Random House sales figures were being bandied about or, in the last publicized case of an employee fired for blogging, actual criticism of Random House employees was made public.

If anything, Pinter’s firing has less to do with him and more to do with his now-former company’s woes. Laying off the bulk of their sales force and then openly lying about it? Getting rid of an editor here, a small department there and scrambling to do something, anything to compensate for not just a bad year, but Bertelsmann‘s overall shortfall thanks to buying back the 25 percent stake that a minority shareholder wanted to take public? In short, this is a classic case of corporate publishing at its cowardly worst, taking a passive-aggressive action that may cover their ass in the short term, but adds yet more grist to the public relations disaster mill in the long term.

So yes, GalleyCat wishes Pinter well. He has a book to promote soon, another due out in February and a third to write under contract, with more in the future. There are job offers to consider and options to mull over. Indeed, rumors of his demise are greatly exaggerated. And if anything, drinks are on us, not the other way around…