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Posts Tagged ‘Kurt Vonnegut’

How Famous Creatives Spent Their Days: INFOGRAPHIC

murakamiHave you ever wondered how much time Les Miserables author Victor Hugo spent sleeping? Or how many hours 1Q84 author Haruki Murakami devotes to writing?

Podio has created an infographic called, “The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People.” The image (embedded below) shows the day-to-day schedules of 26 famous creative professionals including Lolita author Vladimir Nabokov, Slaughterhouse-Five author Kurt Vonnegut, and I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings author Maya Angelou.

Here’s more from The Huffington Post: “Whether we’re working on our latest novels, paintings or compositions and stuck in ruts, or we’re novices to the creative workspace entirely, we can all benefit from seeing how Charles Dickens, Pablo Picasso, and Mozart spent their days — even if it is just for fun.”

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Mediabistro Course

Publishing Your Illustrations and Cartoons

Publishing Your Illustrations and CartoonsStarting December 2, learn how to prepare and submit illustrations for publication! In this course, you'll learn how to pitch your ideas to new publications, approach book publishers with your illustrations, put together a picture book dummy, and start your own illustrated blog. Register now!

Housing Works Bookstore & Vonnegut NYC Team Up for The Kurt Vonnegut Book Group

kurtHousing Works Bookstore and Vonnegut NYC (the New York chapter of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library) will partner together to launch the Kurt Vonnegut Book Group.

Members will meet on a monthly basis to talk about Kurt Vonnegut’s fiction and nonfiction works. During each event, a host will present questions and lead the discussion.

The inaugural event will take place on January 18, 2014 at Housing Works Bookstore Café. For this event, the group will discuss the novel God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater. Will you be attending?

NaNoWriMo Tip #17: Listen to the Advice of Great Authors

nanowrimoNational Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is slowly coming to an end, as writers around the globe try to finish a 50,000-word novel draft in a single month.

To help the GalleyCat readers taking this challenge, we will be offering NaNoWriMo advice throughout the month. Last year, 341,375 participants wrote a novel in 30 days through the NaNoWriMo program. The writing marathon has generated more than 250 traditionally published novels, according to the organizers.

Our seventeenth tip is: Listen to the Great Authors. Think Catalog has put together a very entertaining and useful list of writing tips from authors including: Mark Twain, Dorothy Parker and Neil Gaiman. Kurt Vonnegut‘s tip: “Do not use semicolons. They are transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing. All they do is show you’ve been to college.”

Kurt Vonnegut Fan Fiction To Be Sold on Amazon

Ever wish you could write Kurt Vonnegut fan fiction?

Amazon has acquired a license to let writer publish and sell Vonnegut fan fiction in its new Kindle Worlds platform. They expect to open the Vonnegut service in  August.

Kurt Vonnegut Trust trustee Donald C. Farber called the move “a natural extension of his legacy and a testament to the enduring popularity of his characters and stories. Billy Pilgrim, unstuck in time, is going to quickly become a Kindle Worlds favorite,” referring to the hero of Vonnegut’s classic novel, Slaughterhouse-Five.

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Guillermo del Toro & Charlie Kaufman Hope To Adapt ‘Slaughterhouse-Five’

Director and author Guillermo del Toro told the Daily Telegraph that he hopes to adapt Kurt Vonnegut‘s Slaughterhouse-Five with screenwriter Charlie Kaufman.

According to a print-only interview with the director of Pan’s Labyrinth and Pacific Rim, the duo discussed the project for an hour and a half.  The Playlist has more from the director:

I love the idea of the Trafalmadorians [the aliens of 'Slaughterhouse-Five'] — to be ‘unstuck in time,’ where everything is happening at the same time. And that’s what I want to do. It’s just a catch-22. The studio will make it when it”s my next movie, but how can I commit to it being my next movie until there’s a screenplay? Charlie Kaufman is a very expensive writer!

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Novel-T Turns Kurt Vonnegut Self-Portrait into a T-Shirt

Are you a fan of Kurt Vonnegut? Novel-T, a literary-themed clothing company, has licensed his self-portrait for a summertime t-shirt and tote bag.

The company has pledged to donate $1 from each shirt sale to Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders). Throughout his lifetime, Vonnegut was a supporter of this nonprofit organization.

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Saturday Evening Post Hosts Great American Fiction Contest

The Saturday Evening Post has launched the 2014 Great American Fiction Contest. One winner will receive $500 in prize money and publication in both the January/February 2014 edition of the magazine as well as the website.

Five other writers will be selected as runners-up; they will also be published on the website and collect $100 each.

Only previously unpublished writers are eligible to enter. Each written piece must contain 1,500-5,000 words. Those who enter will have to pay a $10 entry fee. A deadline has been set for 11:59 p.m. EST on July 1, 2013. Follow this link to read all the rules and learn all the details about this contest.

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Kurt Vonnegut on Book Deals: ‘Carry on Without an Advance’

It is too easy for first-time writers to obsess over book deals. Back in 1972, the great author Kurt Vonnegut cautioned one young writer against seeking an advance before finishing his book–sharing important advice that all aspiring authors.

Vonnegut advised his son (author Mark Vonnegut) “to carry on without an advance” while working on his first book. You can read the complete letter he wrote to his son in the new Kurt Vonnegut: Letters collection, but we’ve posted an excerpt below:

I have mixed feelings about advances on first books. They are hard to get, for one thing, and are usually so small that they tie you up without appreciably improving your financial situation. Also: I have seen a lot of writers stop writing or at least slow down after getting an advance. They have a feeling of completion after making a deal. That’s bad news creatively. If you are within a few months of having a finished, edited manuscript, I advise you to carry on without an advance, without that false feeling of completion, without that bit of good news to announce to a lot of people before the job is really done.

Jonathan Maberry: ‘Get your butt in a chair & write.’

Have you ever written a scary story? In honor of the Halloween season, we are interviewing horror writers to learn about the craft of scaring readers. Recently, we spoke with author Jonathan Maberry.

Throughout Maberry’s career, he has won multiple Stoker Awards for his horror work. Last month, Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers released the third installment of the Rot & Ruin series, Flesh & Bone.

He has written for Marvel Comics and published multiple novels for both adults and young-adults. As a nonfiction writer, Maberry has examined topics ranging from martial arts to zombie pop culture. Check out the highlights from our interview below…

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Banned Book Trading Cards

To celebrate the 30th annual Banned Books Week, one library in Kansas has gotten artistic. The Lawrence Public Library has created the Banned Books Trading Cards project, a series of drawings inspired by banned books and authors created by local artists.

Each trading card is inspired by a banned book or author. There is one for each day of the week.  The week kicked off with an homage to George Orwell‘s Animal Farm (pictured right) created by artist Barry Fitzgerald, followed by an homage to Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut, drawn by Kent Smith. Today’s card by an artist known as Webmocker, celebrates John Updike’s Rabbit, Run.

Here is the artist’s statement: “Burning and otherwise destroying books being a favorite activity of censors, deconstruction seemed an appropriate approach to this tattered (literally falling apart as I read it) copy of Rabbit, Run.  Coincidentally, this book was purchased at the Friends of the Lawrence Public Library book sale.”

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