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Posts Tagged ‘Leo Tolstoy’

How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?: INFOGRAPHIC

infographicPersonal Creations has created an infographic called, “How Long Does It Take to Read Popular Books?” which explores how long it takes to read different titles.

According to the graphic, it takes an average of 32.63 hours to read Leo Tolstoy‘s War & Peace and 60.23 hours to read the entire Harry Potter series of books. While titles like Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie and Erich Segal’s Love Story can be read in under two hours.

Here is more about how they calculated reading time:

We took some of the most popular books of all time and estimated how long it would take the average reader to finish by multiplying word count by the average person’s reading speed, 300 words per minute, which will give you an approximate gauge of how long it will take any of the following great books.

Check out the entire graphic after the jump.

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Leo Tolstoy Gets a Google Doodle For His Birthday

Tolstoy Doodle
Google has created a Doodle to celebrate Leo Tolstoy’s 186th birthday. The image pays homage to three works by the famed Russian novelist: War & Peace, Anna Karenina, and The Death of Ivan Ilyich.

Artist Roman Muradov designed the piece. Google has posted an essay Muradov wrote explaining his creative process: ”The language of cartooning, likewise, is the language of reduction; it’s less descriptive than realistic artwork or film, and is less likely to replace the reader’s vision. It seemed fitting to focus on Tolstoy’s central theme of dualism and to highlight his stylistic nuances through the rhythm of the sequences – the almost full moon against the almost starless night, the red of Anna’s handbag, Ivan’s fatal curtains that stand between him and the light of his spiritual awakening.”

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War & Peace to be Adapted as Six-Part TV Series

9780143039990HThe Weinstein Company, Look Out Point, and BBC Worldwide will collaborate to produce a six-part television adaptation of Leo Tolstoy’s novel, War & Peace.

Follow this link to download a free copy of the book.

Screenwriter Andrew Davies will write the script. In the past, Davies has adapted several books including Michael Dobbs’ House Of Cards (the UK TV series), Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice (the 1995 mini-series), and Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones’ Diary.

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Free eBook Flowchart

What’s your favorite kind of book? We’ve created a giant flowchart to help you browse the top 50 free eBooks at Project Gutenberg.

Click the image above to see a larger version of the book map. Your choices range from Charles Dickens to Jane Austen, from Sherlock Holmes to needlework. Below, we’ve linked to all 50 free eBooks so you can start downloading right now. The books are available in all major eBook formats.

Follow this link to see an online version of the flowchart, complete with links to the the individual books.

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Free eBooks of Long, Long Novels

What’s the longest book you’ve ever read? Flavorwire has collected a list of long, long books in the post, “10 Novels That We Dare You to Finish.”

If you are interested in taking the challenge, we’ve listed links below to free eBook copies of five massive novels. This GalleyCat editor loves reading digital copies of long, long novels–it seems like the perfect way to interact with these unwieldy titles.

Here’s more from Flavorwire: “we’ve compiled a list of 10 novels that could also function as doorstops if you decide to give up on them. Maybe you’ve tried to impress your friends by casually mentioning that you’re finally reading Proust, or you’re the annoying person on the train with the weighty tome in both hands, jostling into your fellow passengers because you can’t spare a free hand — whatever the reason, we salute you, foolhardy readers.

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Oprah Winfrey’s Double Dickens Book Club Pick

Oprah Winfrey picked a classic double header for her latest book club selection, choosing Charles DickensGreat Expectations and A Tale of Two Cities.

During her announcement, Winfrey noted: “I’m going old, old school … Normally I only choose books that I have read, but I must shamefully admit to you all that I have never read Dickens.”

Winfrey will use Penguin’s new $20 paperback containing both books and nearly 800 pages. Amazon noted yesterday they have free Kindle editions of both titles. Penguin offers a $7.99 digital edition that includes illustrations, author background, and historical information.

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New Literary Mash-Up Genre: Tabloid Fiction

Russian short story writer Anton Chekhov has joined British novelist Jane Austen on the mash-up victims’ list. New Yorker editor Ben Greenman has published Celebrity Chekhov, taking Chekhov’s writings and adding celebrities. Not to give away too much, but actress Lindsay Lohan receives a flogging on the command of her reality star mother, Dina Lohan.

The Daily News explained how Greenman conceived this idea for “Tab Lit:” “Greenman determined that the best way to update Chekhov’s dramas of love, loss and pride was via our national obsession with fame. ‘Aren’t celebrities fictional characters anyway?’ he asks. Besides, he points out, celebrities face ‘similar pressures’ to Chekhov’s characters: Many of the stories deal with the divide between public and private.”

Earlier this year, Greenman released What He’s Poised To Do, a collection of fourteen short stories about love and letter-writing. Chekhov was renowned for his short stories and plays, especially his four major plays: The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard. He also practiced medicine and maintained a busy career as a physician. According to the publication Letters of Anton Chekhov he once said, “Medicine is my lawful wife and literature is my mistress.”

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Cover Unveiled for Android Karenina

AK_smaller.jpgToday Quirk Books unveiled the cover to the 512-page mash-up book, Android Karenina. Written by Leo Tolstoy and Ben H. Winters, the book will be released in June.

The book continued the “zombie-fication of literature” trend that has swept publishing since Pride and Prejudice and Zombies became a bestseller. According to the release, the book will bring robotic mayhem to the classic novel:

“These characters live in a steampunk-inspired world of robotic butlers, clumsy automatons, and rudimentary mechanical devices. But when these copper-plated machines begin to revolt against their human masters, our characters must fight back using state-of-the-art 19th-century technology–and a sleek new model of ultra-human cyborgs like nothing the world has ever seen.”

You can brush up on the original in this free eBook.

Quirk Books Tackles Tolstoy with “Android Karenina”

tolstoy23.jpegCelebrating the 100th anniversary of Leo Tolstoy‘s death, Quirk Books will extend its remix series of classic literature with “Android Karenina.” The move carries the “zombie-fication of literature” trend into Russian classics.

Quirk plans on 200,000 copies for the book’s first print run, and the title will debut in June. They expect to unveil the real cover in February. The book will be co-authored by Ben H. Winters, who most recently wrote “Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters” for Quirk. GalleyCat interviewed Winters last year about the project.

Here’s more from the release: “As in the original novel, our story follows two relationships: The tragic adulterous love affair of Anna Karenina and Count Alexei Vronsky, and the more hopeful marriage of Nikolai Levin and Princess Kitty Shcherbatskaya. These characters live in a steampunk-inspired world of robotic butlers, clumsy automatons, and rudimentary mechanical devices. But when these copper-plated machines begin to revolt against their human masters, our characters must fight back using state-of-the-art 19th-century technology–and a sleek new model of ultra-human cyborgs like nothing the world has ever seen.”

Brush up with the original in this free eBook.

“Original” War and Peace Slimmer, Happier, Controversial

Can’t stomach the idea of wading through Leo Tolstoy‘s 1500-plus page classic? Well, thanks to the work of scholar Evelina Zaidenshnur and the translation by Andrew Bromfield, you’ll be able to read the author’s purported “first draft” of the novel – some 600 pages lighter, with the removal of Tolstoy’s philosophical musings and the prospect of a happy ending, reports the Independent on Sunday. The new book, to be published in the UK by Fourth Estate in April, was the life’s work of the Russian scholar, who for 50 years pored over thousands of pages to assemble Tolstoy’s first draft, matching different inks, changes in handwriting and types of paper to piece together the author’s earliest version.

Not everyone, however, is pleased. Academics such as Tony Briggs, emeritus professor of Russian language and literature and author of a bestselling translation of the novel, fear many will be tempted to settle for what they regard as an unfinished version. “To claim that it’s the ‘original’ is entirely spurious and is simply selling the novel short,” he said. “This is a sanitised Hollywood happy-ending version where everyone lives happily ever after. But frankly this is an outrage and no one should be misled. The moment Tolstoy thought of these ideas, he rejected them and went on to rewrite them.”

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