FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Lonely Planet’

BBC Worldwide Completes Lonely Planet Purchase

BBC Worldwide will pay $67.2 million to complete the purchase of travel guide publisher Lonely Planet.

Back in 2007, BBC had acquired 75 percent of the company for nearly $142.8 million. This deal gives BBC the remaining 25 percent of the company. On the digital side, the company enjoys 8.5 million unique users on their website and has produced 140 applications.

The Guardian reports: “A strategy to grow non-print revenues – digital revenues rose 37% year on year in the 12 months to the end of March 2010 – and spinoff products such as a Lonely Planet magazine has pushed the business back into the black with profits of £1.9m [$3 million]. Lonely Planet’s non-print revenues have grown from 9% in 2007 to 22% in the year to the end of March 2010.”

Mediabistro Course

Memoir Writing

Memoir WritingStarting January 7, work with a published memoir writer to tell and sell the story of your life! In this course, Wendy Dale will teach you how to create your story around a marketable premise, hone your narrative voice, write a memoir with a solid structure, and sell your memoir before you've even finished writing it. Register now!

China Blocks Travel Guides

The Bookseller reports that Lonely Planet, Rough Guides and Time Out are understood to have had guides to China blocked because they mention the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre. It is unknown whether the guides to China and Beijing have been blocked by officials or whether local distribution channels are refusing to take them. Lonely Planet has also confirmed reports of small numbers of guides being seized by border officials from travelers arriving in China. “We are obviously concerned and disappointed that this is happening,” said Lonely Planet editor Tom Hall, “but from our conversations with travelers, we believe it is an extremely small issue affecting only a handful of travelers.”

All three publishers have no plans to change their guides. “We wouldn’t consider changing our information based on pressure from governments or local publishers,” said Rough Guides spokesman Anna Paynton. Hall added: “We choose not to let outside influences affect our editorial decisions.”

Lonely Planet Writer’s Body Found in Tibet

Three months after he was reported missing, one of Lonely Planet‘s most experienced travel writers, Clem Lindenmayer, has been found dead on a Chinese mountainside. The Independent reports that Lindenmayer had set out to climb Mount Gongga, in a remote area of south-west China, telling his family that he expected to complete a circuit in six days. When they failed to hear from him, his relatives posted messages on travellers’ websites. China’s official Xinhua news agency reported yesterday that villagers had found his body last Thursday.

The Australian-born writer had been based in Switzerland “on and off” for nearly 20 years, according to Lonely Planet. He was not on assignment for the guide-book publisher in China, but the company had said that it was aware of the situation and was in touch with his family.

Publisher Encourages Staff To Leave Office!

Booktrade.info reports on a planned holiday for the staff of Lonely Planet. Armed with a London edition of the newly launched Encounter series they took to the streets of the Capital, tasked with using the book to discover somewhere they had never been before. The company’s marketing executive Myriam Cotterell said: “This was the chance for staff to get to know a new series in the best way possible, by getting out there and using it themselves as well as having some fun in the process.”

But it wasn’t as if staff could simply run out and enjoy the good weather, catch a movie or play your regular brand of hooky, Booktrade continues. Staff instead were given a set of instructions: to Encounter someone/somewhere new, to take a photo of something or someone new and to try out one listing from the guide and review it, picking up tidbits of new information on the way. Preview copies of the guides, which are all written by locals, were also handed out to 1,000 travellers on Lastminute.com.

The New York Times is Trend-Happy

First up is Jennifer Conlin‘s short piece on off-beat tourism books like Lonely Planet‘s THE BLUELIST, which guides prospective travelers on the most dangerous, war zone-like places to visit. Then there’s THE ROUGH GUIDE TO CLIMATE CHANGE, which provides a carbon calculator, a list of online links that can help readers learn not only how much carbon each activity in their life generates but also how that number compares to people in other countries. “I am planning to send the book to all the U.S. Senators,” said Mark Ellingham, the co-founder of the Rough Guides, adding that everyone needs to become much less casual about flying. He urged travelers to make fewer trips and to stay longer.

Meanwhile, Sunday Styles ran Stephanie Rosenbloom‘s article on books, seminars and classes that tackle the tough question of how to deal with “difficult” people. Nan Harrison, the vice president of training resources and publication sales for CareerTrack, which every month presents more than 50 public “difficult people” seminars across the country, attributes the increased popularity of such workshops to a desire to improve workplace skills in a time of corporate downsizing and a more competitive job market. “I think the stakes have gotten higher for everyone,” she said. Then again, maybe the problem isn’t them, it’s you. “There’s a good quote from the Talmud,” said Bruce Elvin, an associate dean and the director of the Career and Professional Development Center at Duke Law School. “‘We do not see the world as it is. We see the world as we are.’ That really in my view sums this topic up.”