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Posts Tagged ‘Margaret Atwood’

Jeff Howe Relaunches One Book, One Twitter as 1book140

Jeff Howe has partnered with The Atlantic to relaunch the online book club, One Book, One Twitter

Howe explained in the announcement: “I’d always intended to relaunch One Book, One Twitter … It has a new name—1book140—but what hasn’t changed is the global, participatory nature of the affair: The crowd is still in charge.”

Twitter readers will choose the book to read in the online book club.  You can still vote on the following titles: The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood, The Keep by Jennifer Egan, Snow by Orhan Pamuk, Super Sad True Love Story by Gary Shteyngart, and Apex Hides the Hurt by Colson Whitehead. Reading will commence on June 1st.

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Time Magazine Celebrates 140 Twitter Feeds

Time magazine rounded up a list of 140 Twitter feeds “that are shaping the conversation.”

In the “news feed” category, Portuguese librarian Jose Afonso Furtado was picked for “his unadulterated love for all things books and publishing-related to the Twittersphere.” Eight writers were listed in the “authors” category including Margaret Atwood, R.L. Stine, and Neil Gaiman.

Two literary-themed feeds made the cut in the “fictional characters” group; Drunk Hulk and Lord Voldemort. In a “Who Do You Follow?” poll, the most readers followed Drunk Hulk and Gaiman. We unmasked Drunk Hulk last year in an interview feature.

Margaret Atwood to Publish New Children’s Book

Margaret Atwood (pictured, via) will publish a new children’s book, Wandering Wenda and Widow Wallop’s Wunderground Washery. Canada’s McArthur & Company will publish the book this summer.

Dušan Petričić, who has worked with Atwood in the past on Rude Ramsay and the Roaring Radishes and Bashful Bob and Doleful Dorinda, will illustrate Wandering Wenda. According to the release, the new book incorporates the “alliterative wordplay” featured in Atwood’s other children’s books.

The publisher also shared this news about two past Atwood-Petričić collaborations: “McArthur & Company will re-publish Rude Ramsay and the Roaring Radishes and Bashful Bob and Doleful Dorinda in paperback, along with audio read by Margaret Atwood and enhanced e-books, in May 2011.” (Via the National Post)

Margaret Atwood Designs Superhero Costumes

Two Margaret Atwood fans received an unexpected gift from the novelist recently: superhero costumes.

It began when nephrologist Dr. Joel Topf (@kidney_boy) tweeted about an Atwood novel to his friend, a writer named Melissa Travis (@Dr. Snit). To thank them for their support, Atwood made an unsolicited offer to design superhero costumes for their Twitter aliases. You can see Atwood’s designs for Dr. Snit and Kidney Boy in the above image.

Topf couldn’t be more pleased and wrote in a personal blog post: “This has been wonderful and exciting. How cool is it to exchange with an author I love and respect. It demonstrates how small the world can be.”

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Margaret Atwood and Jay McInerney Deliver Graduation Speeches

Over at the New Yorker, Book Bench has been collecting 2010 commencement speeches delivered by novelists. They link to the complete speeches, but choose the juiciest quotes in specific categories like “Why Writing Is Like Life” and “Requisite Platitude.”

Read the whole post here, but here is a bit of gloomy advice from Jay McInerney: “the last four years might well be, for some time to come, the high-water mark in your early life.”

And here is a moment of “Humility/Coy Self-Promotion” from the great Margaret Atwood : “For who but a warty person–or, to put it in more romantic terms, one who has visited the shadow side–would have written two fun-filled, joke-packed novels about the almost total annihilation of the human race? I didn’t get any literary awards for those.”

(In lieu of an author photo, we’ve included a video of Atwood’s role in Score: A Hockey Musical)

GalleyCat on Kari Moran’s BookRadio Show: “All About E”

bookradioshow.pngLast weekend, this GalleyCat editor joined radio host Kari Moran once again for her BookRadio Show. Tune in every Sunday at 3 pm PST for our “All About E” segment.

While the show airs on Los Angeles CBS-owned stations KFWB NEWS TALK 980, you can listen to the whole show online. Among the many topics discussed during the hour-long broadcast, we focused on Open Road Media’s work with the digital backlist of novelist William Styron and the future of digital rights. Follow this link to listen.

Last week’s episode featured Occult America: The Secret History of How Mysticism Shaped Our Nation by Mitch Horowitz and The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood, and Side By Side by Dr. Charles Sophy.

Margaret Atwood Sings for “Score: A Hockey Musical”

Over the weekend, novelist Margaret Atwood blogged about her vocal participation in Score: A Hockey Musical–a Canadian movie starring Olivia Newton-John and Nelly Furtado.

To warm us up for the festivities, Salon.com linked to that video embedded above of The Handmaid’s Tale and Oryx and Crake doling out hockey advice on Canadian television.

Here’s an excerpt from Atwood’s blog: “here are some pictures from the set of Score: A Hockey Musical (yes, I sang, shameless me), due to launch October 22. Now that’s a concept … I didn’t see the part where they dance on skates. We were all in an arena freezing our feet off… including Eddie Shack, Walter Gretzkey, Theo Fleury, Alex Tagliani, Dan Hill, and the star, Noah Reid, and the director, Mike McGowan, and Jody Colero, who got me into it, and a jolly supporting cast of thousands!”

(Video via Juliet Ulman, link via Book Bench)

Andrew W.K. Joins Tournament of Books’ Panel of Judges

Tob_2010.jpgA rock star, a culinary memoirist, and a music and literary blogger will help judge The Morning News’ annual Tournament of Books this year.

Performer Andrew W.K. (here), Julie Powell (“Julie & Julia“) and David Gutowski (Largehearted Boy) will all judge the annual competition. This year’s round-robin bracket will pit literary titles against each other. The list includes: “The Year of the Flood” by Margaret Atwood; Wolf Hall, by Hilary Mantel; “Lowboy” by John Wray and NBA winner, “Let the Great World Spin” by Colum McCann.

Here’s more from the announcement: “You can follow along as each contender is passed from reader to reader and judgments are handed down, sometimes passionately, sometimes haphazardly (and sometimes, in the case of Dale Peck in 2006, not at all). We have had judges who admitted they didn’t finish their books. We’ve had Rooster winners who came back as judges the next year, on the condition that we commission for them an aggressive T-shirt. And yes, we’ve had judges who flipped coins. So has the National Book Award—but the National Book Award won’t tell you that.”

Best Books of 2009, Airport Edition

hg_hudson_books_image_2.jpgA few writers received an unexpected bookstore boost today as they nabbed spots on Hudson Booksellers’ Best Books of the Year list. The list will earn these writers some coveted placement in the company’s bookstores, reaching the most captive readership in the whole world–the airport reader.

Hudson runs 65 full-service bookstores around North America, but sells books in over 350 Hudson News stands in airports and transportation hubs. This year the company sold $93 million worth of books. Here are the fiction winners, a list with only a single National Book Award nominee on it. The best nonfiction, business, and young adult books follow after the jump…

Best Fiction: “The Year of the Flood” by Margaret Atwood, “Little Bee” by Chris Cleave, “Spooner” by Pete Dexter, “The Magicians” by Lev Grossman, “The Lacuna” by Barbara Kingsolver, “Fool” by Christopher Moore, “The Song is You” by Arthur Phillips, “Lark & Termite” by Jayne Anne Phillips, “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett, and “Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese.

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Washington Post Book World Podcast Needs Subscribers

washington-post-book-world1.jpgIn an email interview with Washington City Paper, Washington Post Book World fiction editor Ron Charles worried about the subscriber rate for the site’s podcast series.

Here’s more from the post: “There’s no concrete deadline for adding more subscribers, Charles says, or even a goal for how many it needs, just ‘a general mandate to make sure we’re concentrating our efforts on projects that are actually attracting an audience.’” Update: On Twitter, Charles says the podcast needs “about 100K additional subscribers.”

Featuring ten minute interviews with writers like Francine Prose, James Ellroy and Margaret Atwood, the show deserves some iTunes love. After Maria Arana retired, Charles assumed podcasting duties at the review.

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