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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Dery’

Boing Boing Launches Imprint with Mark Dery Book

Boing Boing has started its own publishing imprint with “All the Young Dudes: Why Glam Rock Matters” by Mark Dery.

The popular site runs lots of book-related content and long essays, so digital publishing seems like a natural step. Here’s more about the book:

“All the Young Dudes,” glam rock’s rallying cry, turned 40 last year. David Bowie wrote it, but Mott the Hoople owned it: their version was, and will ever remain, glam’s anthem, a hymn of exuberant disenchantment that also happens to be one of rock’s all-time irresistible sing-alongs. Bowie, glam, and “All the Young Dudes” are inseparable in the public mind, summoning memories of a subculture dismissed as apolitical escapism, a glitter bomb of fashion and attitude that briefly relieved the malaise of the ‘70s. Now, cultural critic Mark Dery gives the movement its due in an 8,000-word exploration of glam as rebellion through style. As polymorphously perverse as the subculture it explores, “All the Young Dudes: Why Glam Matters” is equal parts fan letter, visual-culture criticism, queer theory, and true confession.

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Mediabistro Course

Memoir Writing

Memoir WritingStarting January 7, work with a published memoir writer to tell and sell the story of your life! In this course, Wendy Dale will teach you how to create your story around a marketable premise, hone your narrative voice, write a memoir with a solid structure, and sell your memoir before you've even finished writing it. Register now!

Facebook Etiquette for Writers

Why do some Americans feel nostalgic for a culture “where everyone knows his place?” Cultural critic Mark Dery tackled that question for Thought Catalog, publishing an e-single on American Anglophilia called “England My England.”

We took the opportunity to republish Dery’s Morning Media Menu interview from last year, covering everything from Facebook etiquette to Christian comic creator Jack Chick.

Press play below to listen on SoundCloud. While talking about best Facebook practices, Dery also outlined a version of the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game that could be played with New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani.

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The Only 3 Pieces of Writing Advice You Will Ever Need

At the Los Angeles Festival of Books, we uncovered the only three pieces of writing advice you will ever need.

In the middle of a panel discussion about “Creativity & Imagination,” one audience member asked three great nonfiction writers if they had any advice for aspiring writers.

1. Magic Hours author Tom Bissell repeated the first piece of advice twice: “Read a lot. Read a lot.”
2. I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts author Mark Dery chipped in a simple response: “Write a lot.”
3. Is That a Fish in Your Ear? author David Bellos contributed the final, and perhaps most important, piece of advice: “Don’t expect to make any money.”

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Seven Degrees of Michiko Kakutani

This GalleyCat editor loves playing the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon Game, connecting celebrities to actor Kevin Bacon in six connections or fewer. Would the same game work in the 21st Century literary world?

On the Morning Media Menu today, cultural critic Mark Dery (pictured) talked about his new collection of essays, I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts. While pondering Christian comic creator Jack Chick and YouTube trends, Dery also outlined a version of the Bacon game that could be played with New York Times book critic Michiko Kakutani.

Check it out: “The fact that the reviewer is instantly known to the reviewed creates a very odd kind of interaction. The tendrils of social media reach out rhizomatically and seem to connect everybody to everybody. We’re all in the Kevin Bacon game at this point–you know, seven degrees of Michiko Kakutani. Consequently, everybody who reviews you is a friend of a friend of a friend on Facebook or you retweeted them on Twitter or you rubbed elbows with them somehow in cyberspace. And that makes for peculiar social dance.”

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Mark Dery Lands Book Deal for Edward Gorey Biography

Cultural critic Mark Dery has just inked a book deal for The Doubtful Guest: The Mysterious Mind and Legendary Life of Edward Gorey–billed as “the first true biography” of the iconic artist.

In a post,  Dery declared: “I was born to write this book.” We’ve embedded a YouTube link to the theme credits for PBS’ Mystery, an art project Gorey started in 1980. Read more about the late artist at the Mystery homepage.

Here’s a description of the Mystery art, from PBS: “From the very first episode, Gorey’s incredibly imaginative imagery, animated by Derek Lamb, has given the series is signature look. His skulking characters may seem to be up to no good, but look more closely and you’ll probably realize Gorey is winking at you, like that skull in the tombstone in the opening credits. The message well may be: Enjoy what follows, but take it seriously at your peril.”

Full disclosure: This GalleyCat editor took a NYU course with Dery in 2004.

GalleyCatnip: Stephenie Meyer’s Epiphany

twilightminicover.jpgAs the publishing world heads home for the weekend, here are some publishing news briefs for your reading pleasure.

Nicknamed “a sort of YouTube for publishing,” Scribd has scored a spot on Business Week‘s “The World’s Most Intriguing Companies” list. Also intriguing: to date, they’ve raised $12.8 million in funding.

Cultural critic Mark Dery proves that 2012 is not the end of the world: “Much of the 2012 shtick is a light-fingered (if leaden-humored) rip-off of the late rave-culture philosopher Terence McKenna’s stand-up routine, without McKenna’s prodigious erudition, effortless eloquence, or arch wit”

In a rare public appearance, “Twilight” novelist Stephenie Meyer told Oprah Winfrey more about how she wrote her blockbuster vampire series: “”I didn’t think of it [as a book]. I did the dream. And then I wanted to see what would happen with them. It was just me spending time with this fantasy world, and then when it was finished it was like, ‘This is long enough to be a book!’

Finally, find out why Salman Rushdie‘s essay for Granta was rejected and recently re-accepted.