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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Twain’

Raghuram G. Rajan Wins Business Book of the Year Award

Raghuram G. Rajan won the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award for his book, Fault Lines. A £30,000 prize (approximately $47,300) accompanied the award.

The ceremony and dinner took place at New York’s famous Pierre hotel. During his acceptance speech he praised his publisher, Princeton University Press. Rajan said his wife had advised him on making the book easy-to-read. He thanked his two children, joking that had it not been for them, the book would have been written much faster.

The president of the Carnegie Corporation of New York, Vartan Gregorian delivered the evening’s keynote address. He mentioned the Harry Potter series, the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, Mark Twain, and T.S. Eliot.

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How Would You Merchandise Your Favorite Book?

fear&loathing.jpgA couple weeks ago we wrote about one company’s efforts to create merchandise to sell alongside the adaptation of Elizabeth Gilbert‘s memoir, Eat, Pray, Love.

The Europe on Five Bad Ideas a Day blog took the idea and ran with it, creating some hilarious concepts for literary tie-ins: “The Innocents Abroad (Mark Twain): cigars, random bones of random saints. Assassination Vacation (Sarah Vowell): replica of Ford’s Theater, grassy knoll, wind-up toy of singing-dancing assassin. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (Hunter S. Thompson): um, nothing that would be legal to sell.”

Add your capitalistic ideas in the comments section. This GalleyCat editor only has one piece of merchandise to add: H.P. Lovecraft-inspired Cthulhu Sushi…

Cliffs Notes on Your Telephone

NY31808.jpgEven multitasking 21st Century students still have to cram for literature tests, and Wiley Publishing, Inc. built them a CliffsNotes iPhone app for this digital age.

The company released five individual apps in the first wave of smartphone study aids–including guides for “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain and “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee–the series will eventually include 40 titles. The app provides summaries of plot and thematic elements, character relationship maps, quizzes to test your comprehension, and “audio CramCasts” about the books.

Here’s more from the release: “Modality’s content architects created two distinct review modes to allow for a more customizable study experience. A prescriptive ‘Cram Plan,’ created by the experts at CliffsNotes, orders the content of the app to maximize even small increments of study time. A more traditional e-reader interface presents the app’s complete content in a fashion similar to that of the printed literature notes.”

John Lithgow Resurrects Mark Twain

Actor John Lithgow channeled Mark Twain in that book trailer and a free audiobook (available for one week only) at the The New Yorker–all to celebrate the launch of HarperStudio’s new title, “Who Is Mark Twain?”

In addition to the Lithgow freebies, HarperStudio is experimenting with a new digital book bundle. Readers who purchase the $19.99 hardcover before June 19, 2009 will get a free copy of the digital book.

Here’s more from the post: “When Mark Twain died, he left an enormous amount of unpublished literature. And though not all of it, perhaps, is worthy of perfect binding, HarperStudio has taken the best and collected it in a volume titled ‘Who Is Mark Twain?’”

The Morning After Gotham Book Mart’s Auction

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Yesterday’s auction by Gotham Book Mart gets serious coverage from the New York Times and the NY Post this morning. And even though the line of prospective bargain hunters went around the block before the auction’s 11 AM opening, in the end all the property that was auctioned went to the building’s landlord for $400,000. The store’s owner, 74 year old Andreas Brown, got teary while removing books from the shelves in his office. He left before the auction began. “It’s a bit like interviewing me at my own funeral,” said Brown, who has a penchant for quoting Mark Twain, to the New York Times.

But some people wonder if the auction was, if not rigged, at least set up as more of a smokescreen. Reports the Fine Books & Collections blog, “the rushed sale, held with only two days’ public notice, now seems as if it were intended all along to ensure that the landlord would acquire the contents. Inside, the books were arranged in group lots with titles like “wall of books” and in stacks of boxes that were virtually impossible to inspect during the 90 minute pre-sale period.” The Post also collected some disgruntled quotes. “If you’re going to have a proper auction, you open for a month,” complained Dave Roochvarg, a book collector who met his wife at Gotham. “Nobody knows the value of it, because nobody’s got to look at it. There was no way in an hour.” Brian Bilby, a book dealer, said he could think of only two words to describe the scene: “sad spectacle.”

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