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Posts Tagged ‘Martha Levin’

Raquel Jaramillo Steps Down to Editor-at-Large at Workman

Workman director of children’s publishing Raquel Jaramillo will step down and now serve as editor-at-large.

Publishers Weekly reported that Jaramillo (pictured, via),, made this decision to devote more time to her writing projects– she writes under the pseudonym R.J. Palacio. Her middle-grade novel Wonder has become a New York Times bestseller.

A number of publishers and organizations have also announced changes within their staff this past week.

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Major Reorganization at Simon & Schuster

Simon & Schuster announced a major restructuring today, bringing together all its imprints into four publishing groups. Free Press publisher Martha Levin and Free Press editor-in-chief Dominick Anfuso will both leave the company as part of the reorganization.

Judith Curr will helm Atria Publishing Group, and the Howard Books Christian imprint will be part of this new group. Susan Moldow will lead the Scribner Publishing Group, which now includes Touchstone Books. Touchstone publisher Stacy Creamer will report to Moldow.

Jonathan Karp will direct the Simon & Schuster Publishing Group, adding the Free Press into this new group.  Louise Burke will lead the Gallery Publishing Group, a group that now includes Gallery Books, Threshold Editions, Pocket Books, Pocket Star, MTV Books, and Karen Hunter Publishing.

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Broadway EIC Jumps to Simon & Schuster

C_427730.jpgBroadway Books editor-in-chief Stacy Creamer is moving to Simon & Schuster. Effective May 11, she will serve as VP and publisher of Touchstone Fireside, reporting to Free Press publisher Martha Levin.

Both Touchstone Fireside and Free Press will maintain independence between their respective editorial and publishing staffs. At Broadway Books, Creamer worked on Douglas Blackmon‘s Pulitzer-Prize winning “Slavery by Another Name,” and Lauren Weisberger‘s “The Devil Wears Prada,” and Elizabeth Edwards‘s “Saving Graces.”

Here’s more from Levin’s statement: “Stacy has a proven eye for high-quality books that have broad appeal … We are delighted to welcome a publishing executive of her caliber to Touchstone Fireside.”

The Daily Show Sells Books – Who’d Have Thunk?

The New York Times’ Julie Bosman adopts a sense of gee-whizness in this piece about how Comedy Central‘s flagship satirical show brings on serious authors – and how their books sell in massive quantities thereafter. Of course, let’s remember that if 1.5 million people watch the show, and if 1/10th of the audience (or less) buys books, voila! Instant bestseller (see, BOOK, AMERICA THE.) So the numbers for stardom don’t have to be all that high. Still, the number of serious authors talking to Jon Stewart (and Stephen Colbert on THE COLBERT REPORT) has gone up in the last few years as the number of venues for them dry up elsewhere. Publishers say that particularly for the last six months, both shows have become the most reliable venues for promoting weighty books whose authors would otherwise end up on THE EARLY SHOW on CBS looking like they showed up at the wrong party.

“It was almost an ‘oh my God’ moment,” said Lissa Warren, publicity director for Da Capo Press. “There aren’t that many television shows that will have on serious authors. And when they do have one, it’s almost startling.” Part of the surprise, publishers said, is that the Comedy Central audience is more serious than its reputation allows. They aren’t just YouTube obsessives but a much more diverse – and book-buying – audience. “It’s the television equivalent of NPR,” Martha Levin, publisher of Free Press, said. “You have a very savvy, interested audience who are book buyers, people who do go into bookstores, people who are actually interested in books.”