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Posts Tagged ‘Marysue Rucci’

High School Teacher Lands Deal for Debut Novel

New York City high school teacher Matthew Thomas landed a book deal with Simon & Schuster for his debut novel, We Are Not Ourselves.

Thomas worked on the novel for ten years and inked a deal for “seven figures,” according to Publisher Weekly. Publication is set for 2014. WME Agent Bill Clegg agent negotiated the deal with editor-in-Chief Marysue Rucci. Here’s more about the book:

Set in the second half of the 20th century, the novel is a sprawling portrait of the Irish-American Leary family—Ed, Eileen, and their son Connell—as they move from Jackson Heights, Queens to Bronxville, New York in pursuit of the American dream. Eileen’s unblinking determination to better the family’s status is challenged by her husband’s dedication to teaching—and ultimately, devastatingly, by a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s.

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Gregory Hill & Jill Baguchinsky Win the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award

Amazon and Penguin have announced the two winners of the 2011 Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award. Gregory Hill won the general fiction award for his title East of Denver. Jill Baguchinsky won the YA fiction award for her title Spookygirl.

Here’s more about the contest: “The Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award brings together talented writers, reviewers, and publishing experts to find and develop new voices in fiction … Each winner received a publishing contract with Penguin, which includes a $15,000 advance.”

The judges for the YA fiction category included YA author Gayle Foreman, G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers publisher Jennifer Besser, and literary agent Julie Just. The judges for the general fiction category included novelist Lev Grossman, G.P. Putnam’s Sons editorial director Marysue Rucci, and literary agent Jennifer Joel.

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Jonathan Franklin Lands Deal for Book about Chilean Miners

Journalist Jonathan Franklin has sold 33 Men to Penguin’s Putnam & Sons imprint. The manuscript chronicles the rescue of 33 miners after the Chilean mining disaster earlier this year.

The video embedded above shows a BBC news report about the rescue. Franklin carried a “Rescue Team” pass which allowed him to close access to the rescue effort. The book will contain material from 75 interviews Franklin conducted, including victims.

Editorial director Marysue Rucci acquired the book and Inkwell Management literary agent George Lucas negotiated the deal. The deal included North American hardcover and paperback rights, as well as eBook and audiobook rights.

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Abate v. ICM, Day Two: Laying Out the Timeline

If there’s one thing yesterday’s proceedings in Judge Peter Leisure‘s courtroom demonstrated, it’s the extreme disconnect between legal relevance and true-blue drama. From a legal standpoint, all the preliminary injunction hearing (which wrapped up by 4 PM yesterday) accomplished was to show whether there was enough standing to hold Richard Abate to the terms of his ICM contract until the last day of 2007, or whether ICM’s contract, forbidding Abate to even discuss options with Endeavor, was anticompetitive according to New York law. That will be decided fairly quickly – likely within the week – as Leisure, testier and more impatient than he’d been on Thursday, remarked once more that he’d “never seen such a delay on proceedings for a preliminary injunction” as well as the scuttled TRO. From a contractual standpoint, either Abate left – thus violating his existing contract – or he was fired in passive-aggressive fashion because turning down a new offer imperiled his future and so he needed backup in case that happened.

But you’re not reading this lengthy account for legal wranglings (even though there were plenty, especially when Abate’s father-in-law, Harold Moore, could only testify in limited fashion thanks to attorney-client privilege, a point vigorously debated between ICM counsel A. Michael Weber and Abate’s lawyer Brian Kaplan.) You want the drama. And boy, was there drama, never more evident than when a steely-eyed Esther Newberg, pursing her lips and visibly unhappy to have spent most of the day cooling her heels in the jury room under sequestering until she was called to the stand around 2:30 PM, testified that she felt “betrayed” by Abate’s surprise exit on February 9, someone whom she characterized as being a close friend – though not anymore. Add Sloan Harris‘s testimony as well as Abate’s completion of his to the mix and the real story of this hearing is not so much about money, but about how seemingly close relationships deteriorated so suddenly, so badly – which might explain why the arbitration demand slapped upon Abate late last week is to the tune of $10 million dollars.

But first, let’s backtrack to the very beginning of the day’s events, when Judge Leisure reminded the court that the hearing ought to have wrapped up in a single day and he felt much of it was a waste of time. “I hope we can make some headway here,” he said, and while the court may not quite have got its wishes, the reporters in attendance – yours truly, the LA TimesJosh Getlin and a late-arriving Michael Fleming from Variety – certainly did.

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