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Posts Tagged ‘McNally Jackson Books’

Should Bookstores Charge for Author Events?

Many independent bookstores across the country are considering charging for in-store author events. According to The New York Times, bookstore owners feel that too many people use their businesses as a place to research new titles and later buy the books online.

Here’s more from the article: “Roxanne Coady, the owner of R. J. Julia in Madison, Conn., was one of the first prominent booksellers to begin charging for events about five years ago, a move that she considered ‘desperate’ at the time. A ticket to get in, she said, generally can be paid toward the price of a book … About 10 percent of her revenue now comes from events, which are held about 200 times a year.”

Do you think bookstores should charge for author events? In May, Boulder Book Store implemented an admissions policy for store events. New York City’s McNally Jackson Books will charge for some events once they finish building a lower level events space.

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David Levithan Writes Love Story in Dictionary Entries

In his first adult book, The Lover’s Dictionary, author and editor David Levithan wrote “the story of a relationship told in the form of dictionary entries.”

Levithan (pictured next to an espresso book machine) read at McNally Jackson Books earlier this week. He explained that he used The New York Times’ Book of Words You Need to Know to pick out words for the book. While writing, he followed the dictionary format, telling the story in a non-linear way.

After the reading, the author fielded audience questions. When asked to pick his favorite word, Levithan said “wonder.” He concluded the night with an encore reading of one of his favorite entries in the book,  ”elegy.” What is your favorite word?