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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Calderone’

New Book about Glenn Beck: Tears of a Clown

milbank.pngSend in the clowns! Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank is writing a new book about conservative personality Glenn Beck entitled Tears of a Clown.

Politico reporter Michael Calderone broke the news with a Milbank interview: “Milbank said that what sets Beck apart is a willingness to go where other hosts will not. ‘I think he has a lower bar, and commercially, it’s pure genius,’ Milbank said. ‘He has found the absolute sweet spot in the market right now.’ While impressed with Beck’s success, Milbank doubts that he’s really ‘a true believer.’”

The book will be published by Doubleday, the publisher behind the columnist’s book, Homo Politicus. The Beck book will enter a crowded field: journalist Alexander Zaitchik has a Beck biography coming in June and John Avlon‘s political book, Wingnuts: How the Lunatic Fringe is Hijacking America has a section about Beck.

Photo via, taken by Julia Ewan, The Washington Post.

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Bob Woodward on All the New President’s Men

bwcolor-highres.jpgOver at Politico, journalist Michael Calderone examined three forthcoming books about President Barack Obama. Along the way, he filed a progress report about Bob Woodward‘s new book–which is reportedly is “coming out this year.”

Woodward, one half of the investigative duo that cracked the Watergate scandal wide open, spoke about his new project and his old methods. While his unnamed sources have raised eyebrows in some circles, the co-author of “All the President’s Men” stuck by his journalistic record.

Here’s an excerpt: “Woodward balks at the idea that he was simply ‘recreating’ scenes in his books. ‘It’s reported,’ he said. ‘So-and-so was there and they said this. There are meeting notes and so forth.’ His new book, which he said is ‘going very well,’ will use the same methods, and a White House official confirmed that Woodward is getting access to senior officials and will likely sit down with the president.”

John McCain Ponders Sarah Palin Memoir

images.jpegRecently at the Washington Ideas Festival, former presidential Senator John McCain fielded some questions about his expectations and worries about Sarah Palin‘s upcoming memoir.

Since Palin’s “Going Rogue: An American Life” is named after a label placed on the former Alaskan governor by an angry McCain staffer, the memoir promises to have some pointed insights into her failed vice-presidential bid. Via an article by Politico‘s Michael Calderone, here is McCain’s diplomatic quote: “The part I’m looking forward to most is the part where it energized our campaign, and her selection put us ahead in the polls…The part I’m looking forward to the least thing is some of the disagreements that took place within the campaign.”

In addition, Calderone’s post mentioned an ongoing debate about the mainstream media’s liberal bias when reviewing political books: “NewsBusters asks today if the mainstream media will ignore Palin’s book like this year’s best-sellers from Glenn Beck, Michelle Malkin and Mark Levin (which sold over 1 million copies in 2009 without a NY Times or Washington Post review). I say no.”

Where in the World Is Sarah Palin?

images.jpegWhere in the world is Sarah Palin? The short answer is easy: Writing her memoir. Long answer: Emailing her family members with sports trivia questions from an undisclosed location for the last month while working on her memoir.

NPR linked to an interview with Palin’s father, Chuck Heath, that gave crucial intelligence about the state of Palin’s memoir: “Heath said he gets e-mails when she’s looking for trivial details of her past, like how many points she scored in a high school basketball game or the year the family attended the Boston Marathon. ‘Sarah’s been out of town for almost a month now,’ Heath told The (Idaho) Spokesman-Review. ‘I don’t know exactly where she is, but she’s writing her book.’”

Earlier in the summer, Politico reporter Michael Calderone speculated in a mediabistro.com interview that Palin’s unexpected retirement as governor of Alaska would help her focus on writing her book. (Via Publishers Weekly)

NY Times Absolves Maureen Dowd

bushworld.jpgEver since a blogger discovered an unattributed paragraph in Maureen Dowd‘s NY Times column yesterday, readers around the country wondered if the paper would take action over the mistake. Earlier this afternoon, the Times ruled “there is no need to do anything further.”

Over at Politico, Michael Calderone reports that Times spokesperson Diane McNulty told him the paper corrected the error and would not take any other action.

Here’s the email message from McNulty: “There is no need to do anything further since there is no allegation, hint or anything else from Marshall that this was anything but an error. It was corrected. Journalists often use feeds from other staff journalists, free-lancers, stringers, a whole range of people. And from friends. Anyone with even the most passing acquaintance with Maureen’s work knows that she is happy and eager to give people credit.”

Several Figures Directly Included in Speech

One wouldn’t necessarily think that essayist and thinker Susan Sontag could generate fresh news – what with her having died recently – but as the Observer’s Michael Calderone reports, a 2004 speech just published in a posthumous collection by FSG has sparked some controversy for the discovery that a section on hyperfiction owes a great debt (almost word for word) to a New York Times Book Review piece by Laura Miller in 1998. The similarities were discovered by John Lavagnino, a senior lecturer in humanities and computing at King’s College London, who wrote a short letter to the editor published in the Times Literary Supplement:

“Shortly after personal computers and word-processing programs became commonplace tools for writers, a brave new future for fiction was trumpeted,” Miller had written in the lead of her New York Times Book Review piece.

“Ever since word-processing programs became commonplace tools for most writers-including me-there have been those who assert that there is now a brave new future for fiction,” were the words Sontag delivered in the 2004 lecture.

Miller also wrote: “Hypertext is sometimes said to mimic real life, with its myriad opportunities and surprising outcomes…”

Sontag wrote: “Hyperfiction is sometimes said to mimic real life, with its myriad opportunities and surprising outcomes…”

FSG publisher Jonathan Galassi said that Sontag “didn’t prepare the speech for publication” but that if the allegations prove true, a correction will be added in future printings. Meanwhile, Miller said to Calderone that she initially thought that Sontag “lifted my research” – committing what might amount to a literary misdemeanor. “When I actually sat down and read it,” she said, “it was more than that. The kind of irony is that it was in a lecture on morality and literature.”