InsideMobileApps InsideSocialGames 10,000 Words FishbowlNY FishbowlDC LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy AgencySpy PRNewser MediaJobsDaily UnBeige

Posts Tagged ‘Nick Cave’

Indie Bookstore eBook Dilemma

changinghandslogo.jpgAs the publishing world debated delays in eBooks this week, another, no less important conversation sprang up on Twitter about the difficulty of bundling digital and print content for indie publishers.

To find out more, GalleyCat caught up with Brandon Stout (the “book-besotted PR and design guy” from Changing Hands Bookstore). His commentary was honest and compelling, and we’ve included most of his email interview here: “Our marketing department met one afternoon with the idea that we’d ‘figure out’ eBooks once and for all, including how to bundle them with hardcover purchases–even if it meant giving them away at cost,” explained Stout.

“The more we looked, the more we found that eBook pricing wasn’t just bloated, it was erratic. No clear patterns emerged. Worse still, from publisher to publisher and from book to book we had no reliable way of determining our cost, which of course makes selling eBooks at cost problematic. Very quickly the fantasy that eBooks would be the great equalizer, that they would allow us to compete with Amazon and B&N, vanished.”

He continued: “To make bundling viable at Changing Hands–to make e-books viable for indies at all, really–it’s not enough to sell them at cost. We’d have to sell at a significant loss. Jeff Bezos, as you know, is working to recalibrate public expectation to $9.99 for e-books, and Cory Doctorow and Chris Anderson are working to recalibrate that recalibration to free. Meanwhile, as independent booksellers wait for pricing to come down and DRM issues to shake out, Amazon tightens its grip on early tech adopters — readers who will be far less likely to abandon their Kindles when indies finally limp into the game.”

After jump, Stout offers some suggestions for the future.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Novel Writing: Editing Your Draft

Novel Writing: Editing Your DraftStarting July 16, workshop your novel in-progress with a published author! Erika Mailman's course will function as a workshop, with the emphasis on sharing your work for review and providing critiques for your peers. By the end of this class you'll have up to 75 pages of you novel workshopped and developed patterns to improve your writing. Register now! 

Philip Roth on Bad Sex Award Shortlist

roth$philip.gifYesterday the Literary Review announced the shortlist for their annual Bad Sex in Fiction Award; a list that includes a rock star, a Nobel Prize favorite, and of course, Philip Roth.

Roth (photo by Nancy Crampton, via HMH) was nominated for a racy scene in “The Humbling.” Oz, the gamblers’ former favorite for the 2009 Nobel Prize for Literature, was nominated for “Rhyming Life and Death.” Rock star Nick Cave earned his nod for “The Death of Bunny Munro,” and his publisher told the Guardian they were pleased with the shortlist appearance.

Here’s a particularly juicy passage from a previous nominee, “The Whole World Over” by Julia Glass. “And then before her inner eye, a tide of words leaped high and free, a chaotic joy like frothing rapids: truncate, adjudicate, fornicate, frivolous, rivulet, violet, oriole, orifice, conifer, aquifer, allegiance, alacrity … all the words this time not a crowding but a heavenly chain … a release of something deep in the core of her altered brain, words she thought she’d lost for good.”

The complete list is after the jump, via the Guardian

Read more

Nick Cave’s Experimental Audiobook

In explaining how they built “what may be the most ambitious audiobook yet” for Nick Cave‘s new novel, “The Death of Bunny Munro,” two artists explored the wide-open crossroads of audiobooks, digital books, and web video.

Artists Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard have created materials for rock & roll artist and novelist Cave in the past, and they were granted access to a huge collection of sounds, clips and music from Cave’s musical vault. They created the iPhone app demonstrated in the video above, an audiobook mixing video, music, and Cave reading his novel. The essay also contains photos of Cave’s manuscript, extensively annotated for this unique audiobook application.

Here’s more from the essay: “The text is incredibly vivid and without doubt we’d begun to construct a mental image of Bunny’s world from our first reading, so we began by sharing those images with each other, and developing a kind of shared non-existent movie … But clocking in at over eight hours the soundtrack analogy only really goes so far. The finished result is really something else altogether. Something between a film soundtrack, a radio play and an hallucination.”

Nick Cave and Cormac McCarthy on “The Road”

cmccarthy_theroad.jpgLast week Esquire magazine called the film adaptation of Cormac McCarthy‘s The Road “the most important movie of the year.” Nevertheless, fan reactions to the movie trailer have been mixed.

The adaptation will star Viggo Mortensen and directed by Australian John Hillcoat–who directed musician and author Nick Cave‘s script for The Proposition. In addition, this BBC feature has an interview with McCarthy and Cave concerning the film–complete with a bit of the soundtrack.

Here’s more from the article: “[The film] had its release date pushed back one full year last November. Everyone involved–director, producer, screenwriter–says there was no secret agenda to that, no worry to be inferred, no doubt on anyone’s part about the final product. The movie, which required more than two hundred visual effects to decolorize a landscape stripped of life, simply wasn’t ready.” (Link via.)

Nick Cave’s Rejected Gladiator Sequel

41IINPstaoL._SL500_AA240_.jpgNovelist and musician Nick Cave wrote a sequel to Gladiator at the request of the first film’s lead, Russell Crowe. The studio turned down the draft.

According to the Guardian, fans uncovered a copy of the script, that includes Roman gods, time travel, early Christians, and ends with Crowe’s resurrected character fighting in World War II and Vietnam. Cave is the author of “And the Ass Saw the Angel” and the upcoming novel, “The Death of Bunny Munro.”

Gladiator‘s director, Ridley Scott, explained in the article: “Russell didn’t want to let it go, obviously, because it worked very well. When I say ‘worked very well’, I don’t refer to success. I mean, as a piece it works very well. Storytelling, [it] works brilliantly. I think [Cave] enjoyed doing it.” (Via Ryan Chapman)

After 20 Years, Nick Cave’s Second Novel is Coming

nickcave-novel-2008.jpgOver at the Observer, Leon Neyfakh is reporting that Faber & Faber has bought a novel from Nick Cave, with lead editor Mitzi Angel describing the book, The Death of Bunny Munro, as the “centerpeice” of her first frontlist at Faber—that assessment coming from an interview by Cave’s agent, Jamie Byng, in The Bookseller last week. (UPDATE: Angel tells Neyfakh that Byng’s assessement is not quite accurate, but that the Cave novel is nevertheless a significant acquisition.)

That leads Neyfakh to speculate as to whether a novel from Cave, the former lead singer of the Birthday Party and, since 1984, the frontman of the Bad Seeds, represents the “sophisticated literary fiction with an emphasis on debut novels” that Angel was hired to bring to Faber, comparing the novel to projects from the previous Faber regime like Billy Corgan’s poetry and Courtney Love’s scrapbooks. But those of us who remember Cave’s And the Ass Saw the Angel, published back in 1989, aren’t so sure there’s a contradiction. Granted, our memories can be somewhat hazy two decades on, but we seem to recall it was a really good novel, although your tolerance for dialect-inflected narration may vary. (Fun fact: Cave once chewed us out on a nationally syndicated radio show when we called in to say how much his novel reminded us of Flannery O’Connor! But we still like him anyway!)

(pictures: Wikipedia)