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Posts Tagged ‘Orhan Pamuk’

Sherman Alexie, Mark Strand & Orhan Pamuk Get Booked

Here are some literary events to jump-start your week. To get your event posted on our calendar, visit our Facebook Your Literary Event page. Please post your event at least one week prior to its date.

Sherman Alexie will be speaking about his new collection, Blasphemy: New and Selected Stories at Barnes & Noble Union Square. See him on Monday, October 15th starting 7 p.m. (New York, NY)

The next installment of the Franklin Park Reading Series will feature Emma Straub, Michael Kimball and more. Hear them on Monday, October 15th at the Franklin Park Bar and Beer Garden starting 8 p.m. (Brooklyn, NY)

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The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! You'll leave this course with two original reviews and a list of paying markets for book reviews. Register now! 

Orhan Pamuk Inks Deal with ABRAMS

Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk has landed a deal with ABRAMS for The Innocence of Objects. The book is slated for worldwide release in October 2012. Andrew Wylie of the Wylie Agency negotiated the deal with editor-in-chief Eric Himmel.

This publication catalogs Pamuk’s Museum of Innocence. The actual museum will open to the public on April 27th. This institution, located in Pamuk’s hometown Istanbul, was inspired by Pamuk’s 2008 novel which shares the same name.

Here’s more from the release: “The Innocence of Objects will explore the many meanings of this remarkable project. While it offers a rich visual guide to the exhibitions, it also allows Pamuk to write about things that matter deeply to him, including the psychology of the collector, the proper role of the museum, the uses of photography in modernizing societies, and of course the customs and traditions of his beloved city. The book’s imagery is equally evocative, ranging from pop ephemera that has become ‘collectible,’ to Pamuk’s superb collection of haunting photographs and movie stills of old Istanbul, to the stunning images captured by Turkish photographer Ara Guler.”

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Jeff Howe Relaunches One Book, One Twitter as 1book140

Jeff Howe has partnered with The Atlantic to relaunch the online book club, One Book, One Twitter

Howe explained in the announcement: “I’d always intended to relaunch One Book, One Twitter … It has a new name—1book140—but what hasn’t changed is the global, participatory nature of the affair: The crowd is still in charge.”

Twitter readers will choose the book to read in the online book club.  You can still vote on the following titles: The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood, The Keep by Jennifer Egan, Snow by Orhan Pamuk, Super Sad True Love Story by Gary Shteyngart, and Apex Hides the Hurt by Colson Whitehead. Reading will commence on June 1st.

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Francine Prose Wins International Humanities Medal

Writer Francine Prose (pictured) has been awarded the Washington University International Humanities Medal, a biennial award that includes a $25,000 prize.

Prose accepted her award with an address titled, “Ten Things Art Can Do.” Only three individuals have won this award, including  novelist Orhan Pamuk (2006) and journalist Michael Pollan (2008).

Prose currently serves as president of the PEN American Center and a visiting professor at Bard College. Her first novel, Judah the Pious was published in 1973. In 2009 she released two titles, the YA novel Touch and the nonfiction book Anne Frank: The Book, the Life, the Afterlife.

Stephen King Headlines Vampire Panel at New Yorker Festival

This year’s New Yorker Festival took place last weekend.  Twitter fans at the festival used the hashtag, #tnyfestival.

On Saturday, Joan Acocella (author of the vampire essay, “In the Blood”) moderated the Vampires Revival panel. On board to speak were philosophy professor Noel Carroll, horror novelist Stephen King, vampire film director Matt Reeves, and Twilight screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg. A video preview of the panel discussion is embedded above.

Several dozen King fans waited outside the venue only to be disappointed by King’s unwillingness to sign books. As he walked away with his arms in the air, he told the crowd: “I can’t sign guys, I got to get something to eat.” Alas, just because he’s a “king” doesn’t mean he isn’t human.

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Orhan Pamuk Seeks to Build Museum

Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk (pictured) seeks to build his fictional  Museum Of Innocence as an actual museum. The museum will be located in Pamuk’s hometown Istanbul, Turkey, and he hopes to open before the end of 2010.

Turk Net Haber reports: “Pamuk has been carrying out the preliminary activities for the establishment of the museum in Istanbul’s Cukurcuma district for a long time. The museum is expected to make a poetic and documentary representation of the culture of Istanbul from 1950s until the present day, through various objects used in daily life, photographs, paintings and movies.”

In 2008, Pamuk published The Museum Of Innocence in Turkey. Maureen Freely handled the English translation and that came out in 2009 from Random House’s Alfred A. Knopf imprint. Freely has worked alongside Pamuk as the translator for five of his novels including The Black Book, Snow, Other Colors, Istanbul, and The Museum Of Innocence.

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Kureshi Accuses BBC of Censorship

Hanif Kureshi‘s National Short Story Prize-nominated story was supposed to be read on the BBC, but that didn’t happen after concluding that the broadcast timing of “Weddings and Beheadings” “would not be right” following unconfirmed reports that kidnapped BBC Gaza correspondent Alan Johnston had been killed by a jihadist group, reports the Guardian. Kureshi hit back, saying he was angry at the decision, which he described as a result of “stupid thinking” on the part of BBC executives. “There are journalists and newspapers in peril all the time around the world. We support them by supporting freedom of speech rather than by censoring ourselves.”

Maureen Freely, best known as Orhan Pamuk‘s translator, is also shaking her head at the decision, calling it “doubly dishonest.” “First they ban the story and then they try to convince us that actually, they haven’t. First they broadcast wall-to-wall coverage of 1001 Baghdad bombs, and then they say we’re too delicate to consider the same hell from a different angle. But isn’t that what art is meant to do – challenge received opinion and make us think?”

Pamuk Reportedly Living in Exile in New York

The Telegraph reports that in the wake of possible threats after the assassination of journalist Hrant Dink, Orhan Pamuk has left his native Turkey behind for New York City, and is said to have told friends he has set no deadline for his return. “What I was told was more than mere rumour,” said prominent Istanbul columnist Fatih Altayli. “Pamuk recently withdrew $400,000 from his bank account and said he would leave Turkey and would not be returning to his country any time soon.”

Pamuk’s agent wouldn’t comment about the potential change, but the author has been under fire for “insulting Turkishness” – the dubious honor afforded to many a Turkish writer for speaking out on important issues, such as Pamuk’s acknowledgment that acknowledging that under the Ottoman empire Turks had triggered the genocide of one million Armenians nearly a century ago. But even the country’s foreign minister admits that matters are even more difficult in the wake of Dink’s murder. “People outside Turkey think you can be thrown into jail for opening your mouth,” he said. “They think there are hundreds of journalists and intellectuals in jail. This is all false.”

Elif Shafak’s Endangered Status

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The New York Times’ Julie Bosman gets a hold of Turkish writer Elif Shafak on her one and only American stop – a tour curtailed from six cities to one as a result of the murder of Hrant Dink, a prominent Turkish newspaper editor of Armenian ancestry and a close friend of Shafak. It also didn’t help that Shafak herself was on trial for “insulting Turkishness,” a charge that’s nabbed Orhan Pamuk (though both he and she were acquitted.) “A writer is always more than a writer in Turkey, much more so than in America,” Shafak said. “We don’t discuss the writing, but we discuss the writer herself. Eventually, every writer has to face the question- are you ready to be a public intellectual?”

She’s also wondering if she’s ready to write again after the recent birth of her first child. “After giving birth, I couldn’t write for a while,” she said. “The novel is such a selfish genre, and novelists are self-centered people. You live with those characters you create. When you are raising a kid, you can’t be selfish anymore.” Which might explain her thoughts on a potential new novel. “I think it will be, in a way, about a withdrawal into a cocoon. That’s how I feel right now.”

Pamuk Cancels Germany Appearances

Turkish Nobel laureate Orhan Pamuk has canceled a publicity tour of Germany amid fears for his safety following the murder of Turkish-Armenian editor Hrant Dink, the Guardian reports. Hanser Verlag, Pamuk’s German publisher, confirmed that the celebrated author had called off a string of book readings in Hamburg, Cologne and Stuttgart. He was also due to receive an honorary degree at Berlin’s Free University on Friday.

Dink’s murder was also cited as the reason Elif Shafak – who, like Pamuk, faced trials for “insulting Turkishness” before an acquittal was handed down – sharply curtailed her US book tour for THE BASTARD OF ISTANBUL last week.