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Posts Tagged ‘Paul Bogaards’

New Haruki Murakami Book in 2014

The English translation of Haruki Murakami‘s latest book is expected to be finished by the end of 2013.

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group executive director of media relations Paul Bogaards told us that English readers worldwide should see Murakami’s new novel in 2014. The publisher will make a formal announcement later this year about the novel. Yesterday, The Millions posted about the highly anticipated book:

That new Haruki Murakami book that’s been selling one million copies per week in Japan? Yeah, the one you’re excited to read? It’s coming out in Spanish in October of this year, so hopefully that means an English translation is in the pipeline as well.

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Random House Contacts OR Books About Fifty Shades Cover Art

Random House has asked OR Books to change the cover of Fifty Shades of Louisa May, a work that parodies the best seller 50 Shades of Greyframed as an erotic diary written by Louisa May Alcott.

Random House contacted OR Books after OR launched a “Bonnets for Bondage” promotion, offering readers a free copy of Fifty Shades of Louisa May in exchange for their copy of Fifty Shades of Grey.

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group executive director of publicity Paul Bogaards explained the circumstances to GalleyCat via email. He wrote: “Counsel did contact OR books about the cover art for their book Fifty Shades of Louisa May, suggesting they revise same. They also requested that OR books refrain from using cover art from Fifty Shades of Grey in their promotional materials. The issue was not about the parody but the use of our cover art to help promote it.”

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Do We Need Summer Fridays?

It’s Summer Fridays time again, that special season when some lucky publishing folks get to leave early every weekend. Knopf publicity director Paul Bogaards tweeted about the annual tradition last night (embedded above).

Some feel publishers should be working straight through the week during this time of revolutionary change, while others think Summer Fridays are a nice reward for employees.

What do you think? We explored the big debate in two posts: Why Publishing Needs Summer Fridays and Why Publishing Does Not Need Summer Fridays.

Joan Didion Cancels UCLA Live Event

UCLA Live revealed that “due to injury,” author Joan Didion has cancelled her scheduled conversation with Mona Simpson in April.

The Los Angeles Times has an update: “She was at lunch and ‘banged her leg,’ said Paul Bogaards, Knopf’s executive director of publicity and marketing.”

Here’s more from the event: “We’re sorry to report that our highly anticipated event with bestselling author Joan Didion on Saturday April 14 has been canceled due to injury. If you purchased tickets, you may receive a refund for your ticket at the point of purchase.”

Gizmodo Blogger Bashes DRM Restrictions & Random House Responds

Gizmodo blogger Mat Honan wrote an angry post yesterday when he discovered his Kindle eBook copy of Haruki Murakami‘s 1Q84 could only be read on one digital device.

Gizmodo has since updated the post: “Paul Bogaards of Random House notes that 1Q84, and all its titles, support a six device limit … Also today, Amazon public relations responded to my previous query, contradicting what its customer service department told me, and noting that ‘There is no one-book limit on this title, there was an error that affected very few readers that has since been corrected.’”

Earlier this year, we wrote about copy and paste restrictions on the Kindle. With most Kindle eBooks, you can read on an smartphone, switch to a Kindle, and then read on an iPad without missing a page turn. It all remains in wireless sync as you read the book.

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Haruki Murakami’s 1Q84 Coming 10/25 in Single Volume

Knopf publicity director Paul Bogaards revealed that Haruki Murakami‘s highly anticipated three-volume novel will come out October 25 in a single volume.

Here’s the tweet: “Haruki Murakami’s long-awaited magnum opus, 1Q84, out from Knopf 10/25. In one volume. Booyah! Midnight store openings for this one?”

In an interview last year, translator Jay Rubin shared thoughts about working with the novelist–revealing the impending deadlines for the English translation of Murakami’s three-volume novel. (Via Michael Orthofer)

Eva Gabrielsson Hopes to Finish Fourth Millennium Manuscript

Eva Gabrielsson, the life-partner of the late Stieg Larsson, has written a memoir, but she also hopes to finish an incomplete Millennium series manuscript.

While no plot details have been revealed, The New York Post reports that Gabrielsson is promising fans a Lisbeth Salander story where she “little by little frees herself from her ghosts and her enemies.”

Gabrielsson explained that she wrote together with the late novelist, but she cannot finish the book without the “undisputed rights to his [Stieg's] work.” According to Knopf publicity director Paul Bogaards, Joakim and Erland Larsson still retain those rights and they have no intention of publishing this mysterious manuscript. (Via The Guardian)

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Hillary Books: What’s the Rush?

For those keeping score, last month Knopf announced that it was publishing Carl Bernstein‘s 640-page book A WOMAN IN CHARGE: THE LIFE OF HILLARY CLINTON, originally planned for the fall, on June 19, surprising Little, Brown, which was scheduled to publish its own Hillary book by Jeff Nerth and Don Van Natta Jr., HER WAY: THE HOPES AND AMBITIONS OF HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, on Aug. 28. Then, this month, Little, Brown said it had also decided to move its publication date to June 19, making the rivalry abundantly clear.

Now the release date wars have really heated up, reports the New York Times’ Motoko Rich. Bernstein’s book will now publish on June 5, with Nerth and Van Natta’s to follow only three days later. Knopf spokesman Paul Bogaards said the push-up correlates to the Democratic primary debate in New Hampshire on June 3 which “presented a significant coverage event for our book.” Little, Brown publisher Michael Pietsch explained HER WAY would be excerpted in The New York Times Magazine on June 3, which prompted the move of its on-sale date to June 8. “It’s not Belmont, mind you,” Bogaards said, “but I like the fact that our horse is already saddled up and in the paddock, ready to run, shall we say.” Thankfully, Pietsch did not engage in any horse metaphors, and the books can’t be moved up any further lest booksellers’ headaches worsen..

A Dangerous Path to Bestseller Status

It’s a Jeff Trachtenberg double bill at the WSJ today, and in the second half of the double feature, he looks at why Conn and Hal Iggulden‘s THE DANGEROUS BOOK FOR BOYS – first published in the UK and Australia – has not only transferred its success to America but is on track to sell millions of copies, if HarperCollins‘ projections and hopes are to be believed.

The purports to aim itself at a particularly inscrutable and un-book-friendly audience: boys around the age of 10. It tries to answer the question: What do boys need to know? The answer is that boys need a certain amount of danger and risk in their lives, and that there are certain lessons that need to be passed down from father to son, man to man. The implication is that in contemporary society basic rules of maleness aren’t being handed off as they used to be. The message is not only hitting boomer fathers but their young sons, as Knopf executive Paul Bogaards found out when he took the book home to his eight year old son, Michael. Bogaards says Michael took to it immediately, demanding that his dad test paper airplanes into the night, even missing “American Idol.” He adds: “That’s the good news. The bad news is that he now expects me to build him a treehouse.” He concludes: “Million-copy-plus seller easy, with the shelf life of Hormel Spam.”

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Media Wants to Click on Them



David Shipley
and Will Schwalbe seem to be the It Boys of publishing this week (not to mention the talk of the town) as they and their new book SEND get written up in USA Today, New York and now the Observer. Not bad at all for a little book on the etiquette of sending and receiving email (one that’s an entertaining refresher on common sense) though the attention is probably magnified by the authors’ respective day jobs: Shipley is the New York Times’ Op-Ed editor while Schwalbe is Hyperion‘s editor-in-chief.

So how did they write the book? Not in the way you think. “We wrote it side by side, his place and my place,” Shipley explained to the Observer’s Spencer Morgan. “Maybe because we’re both editors, there was less of a sense of ownership in terms of how you write, and maybe the speechwriting was helpful for me in that regard-because I wrote speeches for Clinton, and that’s more of a collaborative process than going off somewhere in the woods and writing. But it really was just weekends, early in the morning, late at night, just sitting side by side writing.”

And the media bubble is only beginning: SEND and its authors are slated to appear on Good Morning America, NPR, Amazon’s Fishbowl and much, much more. “We’ve arrived at a juncture in our civilization where there is a clear need for this book,” said Paul Bogaards, executive director of publicity at Knopf. “So people either need to master [e-mail], or they become its slave.”