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Posts Tagged ‘Paula Guran’

‘What If Being a Librarian Was the Most Dangerous Job in the World?’

Novelist Liz Williams has inked a  three-book deal with Prime Books for her new series, The Worldsoul Trilogy. The series carries the epic tagline: “What if being a librarian was the most dangerous job in the world?”

Williams (pictured, via) is the author of the Detective Inspector Chen series and a Philip K. Dick Award nominated author. She described the book: “it’s about a stolen library, an unstable monorail, several renegade sphinxes and much else besides. It’s more fantasy than SF.” Paula Guran from Prime Books acquired the series. Shawna McCarthy from The McCarthy Agency negotiated the deal. Publication is scheduled for 2011 or early 2012.

Here’s more about the series: “The first book focuses on Worldsoul, a great city that forms a nexus point between Earth and the many dimensions known as the Liminality: a place where old stories gather, where forgotten legends come to fade and die—or to flourish and rise again…” (Via io9)

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More on S&S’s Boilerplate Contract Changes

Simon & Schuster‘s boilerplate contract change to exclude a minimum threshold for determining whether a book should stay in print or not continues to get traction. AP’s Hillel Italie offers his own summary but also includes an intriguing nugget from an interview with S&S CEO Jack Romanos, who said that in an ideal market the only books he could envision going out of print were time-sensitive works such as tax guides – and that fiction titles especially should never go out of print. That opinion was seconded by HarperCollins president and CEO Jane Friedman, also interviewed by Italie last week. “No. In one word, no. There is no reason for a fiction title to go out of print, because you never known when there is going to be an audience for that book,” she said.

Which brings us back to print-on-demand. In a follow-up email, S&S spokesman Adam Rothberg explained that the earlier version of the boilerplate contract “reflected a time when p.o.d. was nascent and not-ready for prime time. This brings it into the era when p.o.d. is an established printing technology and p.o.d. books are readily available for sale.” But agent David Black told the NYT’s Motoko Rich that in reality, if a book is available only through print-on-demand, “an author’s book is going to be available in dribs and drabs.” He added: “If there is the possibility that I can take this book and place it somewhere else where somebody is going to publish it more aggressively than on a print-on-demand basis, shouldn’t I have the opportunity to do that?”

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