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Posts Tagged ‘Pete Dexter’

Best Books of 2009, Airport Edition

hg_hudson_books_image_2.jpgA few writers received an unexpected bookstore boost today as they nabbed spots on Hudson Booksellers’ Best Books of the Year list. The list will earn these writers some coveted placement in the company’s bookstores, reaching the most captive readership in the whole world–the airport reader.

Hudson runs 65 full-service bookstores around North America, but sells books in over 350 Hudson News stands in airports and transportation hubs. This year the company sold $93 million worth of books. Here are the fiction winners, a list with only a single National Book Award nominee on it. The best nonfiction, business, and young adult books follow after the jump…

Best Fiction: “The Year of the Flood” by Margaret Atwood, “Little Bee” by Chris Cleave, “Spooner” by Pete Dexter, “The Magicians” by Lev Grossman, “The Lacuna” by Barbara Kingsolver, “Fool” by Christopher Moore, “The Song is You” by Arthur Phillips, “Lark & Termite” by Jayne Anne Phillips, “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett, and “Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese.

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Novelist Pete Dexter’s ARC Confession

0446540722.01.MZZZZZZZ.jpgIn a note for the advance copy of his new novel, author Pete Dexter confessed that his ARC arrived three years late, lost 250 pages, and “is further away from the finished product than most advanced readers’ editions are.”

The Millions transcribed the humorous letter, giving a brief history of how Dexter’s “wry, impolitic sense of humor” surfaces in these ARC letters. It should be required reading for all deadline-bound writers and impatient publishers.

Here’s more from the note: “At any rate; turns out that bringing a book home three years past deadline presents problems for the publisher. Publications have to be set (again), covers drawn, generous comments collected – god knows how many of my greatest admirers have died while I’ve been diddling around with this thing – and so you can understand, perhaps, that in the end someone had to put his/her foot down and say enough, and in the end somebody did.”

Random House’s Longest-Serving Editor Is Feted

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After reading Dinitia Smith‘s story about Robert Loomis, who’s just turned 80 and has spent a record 50 years as an editor at Random House, I feel very red-faced. Because Korda, Mayhew, Mehta and Gottlieb are names that trip easily off my publishing-wonk tongue, but Loomis? Alas, my industry vocabulary hadn’t included him – until now. But then, he’s an editor of the classic mold, content to stay in the background and let the spotlight shine upon authors such as William Styron, Calvin Trillin, Edmund Morris, Maya Angelou, Shelby Foote, Jonathan Harr and Pete Dexter.

“About 25 years ago, I began to think, ‘I’m a stick in the mud,’” Loomis told an audience of close to a hundred – including many of the authors he helped launch to stardom – in the trustees room of the New York Public Library last week, at a tribute celebrating his 50 years at Random House. “‘Why wasn’t I moving on?’” Why wasn’t he like so many other editors jumping from house to house in search of bigger, better opportunities? Because, simply put, he loved his authors too much, and if one needed years to write a book, he’d wait patiently for the finished product. But as for the retirement question, Loomis is quick to shrug it aside. “It makes people nervous.” He will always be attached to Random House, he said.