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Posts Tagged ‘Peter Brantley’

Pick Publishing Panels for the SXSW Festival

sxsw23.jpgScores of publishing types are vying for a coveted spot at the SXSW Festival next year, proposing more than twenty panel discussions about the future of publishing. Online readers can vote on their favorite panels, helping determine the line-up at the festival next March.

Last year’s publishing panel sparked fireworks among literary bloggers. Over at BookSquare, Kassia Krozser has created an excellent list of all the voting options for 2010. Here’s a sampling of the entries, but be sure to vote on the complete list. Simply follow the individual links to vote.

-Beyond Publishing: When Every Book is Connected to Everyone: Stephanie Troeth, Book Oven (Hugh McGuire, Peter Brantley, Andrew Savikas, Kassia Krozser)
-A Brave New Future for Book Publishing : Kevin Smokler, CEO BookTour.com
-Romancing the e-Book: Publishing’s e-Volutionary Revolution: Deidre Knight, Knight Agency (includes GalleyCat senior editor Ron Hogan)
-The Novel in 2050: Richard Nash, Red Lemonade
-Book Publishing – The New Ecosystem: Maya Bisineer, Memetales
-Authors, Publishers and Social Media: Hug it Out: Tim O’Shaughnessy, LivingSocial
-Why Keep Blogging? Real Answers for Smart Tweeple: Emily Gordon, Emdashes.com founder, includes GalleyCat senior editor Ron Hogan.

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O’Reilly Media Heads to Frankfurt Book Fair

tocconf.jpgOn Tuesday, October 13, 2009, O’Reilly Media will host a one-day Tools of Change conference near the Frankfurt Book Fair–hoping to lure some old-school publishers with some new technological tricks.

According to Bookseller, the line-up of guests includes author and blogger Cory Doctorow; Shortcovers’ VP of Content, Sales, and Merchandising Michael Tamblyn, Internet Archive director Peter Brantley, and Pan Macmillan UK digital director Sara Lloyd. The New York City version of the conference has sold out for the last two years, and GalleyCat has reported on the publishing event for years.

Here’s more from O’Reilly’s VP of digital initiatives, Andrew Savikas, from the article: “Tools of Change for Publishing is helping shape the future of the publishing and media landscape, and bringing that message of change to the international audience attending Frankfurt is recognition that many of the opportunities for publishers are now truly global ones.”

Google Gets Attacked on Several Fronts

With the Association of American Publishers‘ annual meeting in full swing today, the prevailing theme is what to do about Google‘s plan to digitize all books ASAP. Which is why, as the Financial Times’ John Gapper reports, Microsoft plans to launch a fierce attack on Google over its “cavalier” approach to copyright, accusing the internet company of exploiting books, music, films and television programs without permission. Tom Rubin, associate general counsel for Microsoft, will say in a speech in New York that while authors and publishers find it hard to cover costs, “companies that create no content of their own, and make money solely on the back of other people’s content, are raking in billions through advertising and initial public offerings.”

Further, according to the speech published in today’s WSJ, Rubin will say that Google’s plan “systematically violates copyright, deprives authors and publishers of an important avenue for monetizing their works and, in doing so, undermines incentives to create”. It a sentiment that the University of California, Berkeley now seems to agree with, according to Peter Brantley‘s blog. “Can we say it was a mistake?/For it was a mistake/The goal is undeniably grand, and good/The means have left much to be desired” Brantley states, poetic-style, in rather blunt fashion. And in case the message wasn’t clear, he later adds “Can we say it? The deals are not fair. We were taken advantage of. We are asked to be grateful for something wondrous where we could have achieved more for ourselves and demanded more from others. We let this happen and we should not have. Now we must count on the beneficence of others. We need speak of the bitterness, laugh at our own stupidity, and move forward.”