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Posts Tagged ‘picture books’

Radar Speculates Maria Shriver Could Land $15M Deal for Hypothetical Memoir

RadarOnline.com speculated this weekend that Maria Shriver could receive $15 million or more for a hypothetical tell-all book after her divorce from former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Despite the provocative post, Shriver has not expressed any desire to write such a book.

Here’s more from the article: “One top publishing exec told RadarOnline.com that California’s former First Lady could garner more than the all-time advance record, the $15 million paid to Bill Clinton for his memoir, My Life … But a tell-all about growing up a Kennedy and especially her life with the cheating Arnold and learning he fathered a child by their maid, that’s a whole different story — literally — and it could set sales records.”

Shriver has written three nonfiction titles and three picture books. Her 2000 title, Ten Things I’d Wish I’d Known Before I Went Out Into The Real World, was based on a commencement address she gave at the College of the Holy Cross. Shriver has also established a successful career as a television journalist with two Emmy Award wins under her belt.

Laurel Croza & Tao Nyeu Win Ezra Jack Keats Awards

Last night the Ezra Jack Keats Foundation and the New York Public Library revealed the winners of the 2011 Ezra Jack Keats Awards. Laurel Croza won the New Writer Award for I Know Here. Tao Nyeu won the New Illustrator Award for Bunny Days.

The annual award honors two individuals who create picture books for children (age 9 and under). Library Journal editor Barbara Genco chaired a committee of nine industry professionals to select the two winners.

Here’s an excerpt from Croza’s acceptance speech: “In the fall of 2003, I enrolled in a creative nonfiction class called ‘True to Life: Writing Your Own Story’… my first writing assignment was ‘draw a map of your earliest remembered neighborhood. Bring this neighborhood to life and then tell a story from the map.’ And that’s why this award, the Ezra Jack Keats New Writer Award, is so fitting, so apt because brand new to writing, the very first story I wrote became the first draft for this book, I Know Here. “  (Photo Credit: Jori Klein)

Tips for Writing a Picture Book

Have you got a great idea for a picture book? Writing consultant Renee Gray-Wilburn (pictured, via) offered some advice for working with the form.

Gray-Wilburn urged writers to avoid offering parental guidance to young readers in a picture book. She also talked about incorporating repetition, the five senses, and fun words into your picture book manuscript.

Here’s more from the blog post: “Kids love nothing more than to know that they were responsible for solving a problem. So whatever conflict or crisis situation you’ve set up in your picture book, allow the child character to be the one to figure out a solution. It’s OK to have parents in your picture book; this is a normal part of a child’s world, so they’d probably be expecting them.”

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Roger Hargreaves Gets Google Doodle for Mr. Men & Little Miss Books

Google has created sixteen Mr. Men and Little Miss-themed Google Doodles in celebration of author/illustrator Roger Hargreaves‘ 76th birthday. As an extra bonus, the doodles change each time the Google page is reloaded.

Here’s more from The Guardian: “More than 100m books based on Hargreaves’s characters have been sold worldwide in 28 countries, while five more were completed by his son Adam, but even greater world domination may yet be on the way in the form of a big screen adaptation.”

The image embedded above stars the iconic character that started off the Mr. Men series, Mr. Tickle. Below, we’ve embedded three of our favorite Google Doodles. They feature the following characters: Mr. Happy, Little Miss Naughty and Little Miss Sunshine. (via Publishers Weekly)

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Three Lives & Company Bookshop Boasts A+ ‘Literary Inspection Grade’

As new regulations forced New York City restaurants to display their health inspection grades, the Three Lives & Company bookshop decided to show off an A+ “Literary Inspection Grade.”

The Vanishing New York blog posted a photo of the sign, a reproduction of the food inspection grades hand-drawn by author and illustrator Elisha Cooper.

By Nightfall author Michael Cunningham once called Three Lives & Company “one of the greatest bookstores on the face of the Earth.” How would you rate your local bookstore?

Children’s Author Brian Jacques Has Died

Beloved children’s author Brian Jacques (pictured, via) passed away this week at 71-years-old. He wrote chapter novels, picture books, and short story collections during his long career.

According to BBC News, the author sold more than 20 million books internationally. Jacques is best-known for his Redwall fantasy series. Before Jacques died, 21 chapter books, three picture books, a graphic novel adaptation, and an opera were all published about the Redwall series.  In June 2010, the author’s blog announced that the 22nd book in the series will be published this year.

Here’s more from BBC News: “Some critics compared [Jacques' books] to J.R.R. Tolkien‘s Lord Of The Rings and Watership Down by Richard Adams. Even as a child he showed literary talent. He was caned by a teacher who could not believe that a 10-year-old could write so well when he penned a short story about a bird who cleaned a crocodile’s teeth.”

Picture Books: Fading or Flourishing?

The New York Times generated hundreds of comments last week, reporting that picture books don’t sell very well anymore.

The article offered a few explanations, including the increasing pressures of school-issued standardized testing and parents transitioning their children from picture books to chapter books at an earlier age. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers publisher Justin Chanda explained: “There’s a real push with parents and schools to have kids start reading big-kid books earlier. We’ve accelerated the graduation rate out of picture books.”

Teacher Monica Edinger offered a rebuttal in the Huffington Post. She saw an increase of chapter book presence in her fourth grade classroom after Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire came out. At the same time, she encouraged her students to read whatever it is they desired; some clung to J.K. Rowling‘s boy wizard, while others reverted back to their beloved picture books.

Edinger wrote: “So, yeah, I think there is a trend for kids to read longer books younger, at least in the sort of community I teach in. But I don’t get the sense that this causes them to abandon picture books earlier. Rather, they read both…So while kids seem to be reading chapter books younger they are also enjoying picture books when they are older. Good news, I’d say.”

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