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Posts Tagged ‘Piper Kerman’

Share Books with Prisoners Through Word Books

Inspired by Piper Kerman‘s prison memoir, Orange is the New BlackWord Books has created a way for readers to share books with prisoners.

You can donate to Books Through Bars directly from the Word Books website. Check it out:

Books Through Bars sends quality reading material to prisoners and encourages creative dialogue on the criminal justice system, thereby educating those living inside and outside of prison walls. Based on their books wanted guidelines, we’ve created a list of books you can purchase through us to donate. Just choose “Pick up in store,” and write BOOKS THROUGH BARS in the comments.

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

Orange Is The New Black Debuts on Netflix

The Netflix-produced, 13-episode adaptation Piper Kerman‘s Orange Is the New Black is now available to stream on Netflix. You can watch the trailer above, it contains some language that might not be appropriate for viewing at work.

Jenji Kohan, the creator of Showtime’s Weeds, adapted Kerman’s critically acclaimed prison memoir for Netflix. USA Today had this review of the new series:

a deft mix of comedy and drama in which the prison feels like a real place and the women are actual people, rather than a thinly veiled excuse to stage catfights, lesbian fantasies and sexual assault. As with Weeds, Kohan is telling the story of a white, middle-class woman who must suddenly cope with career criminals, but this time there’s a sad undertone to the story that makes the tale seem that much more relatable.